1 inch type B videotape

Enlarge picture
Type B video tape
1 inch type B VTR (designated Type B by SMPTE) is an open-reel videotape format developed by the Bosch Fernseh devision of Bosch in Germany in 1976. It never saw much success compared to the competing 1" Type C format, due to the format requiring an optional, and costly, digital framestore in addition to the normal analog timebase corrector to do any "trick-play" operations such as slow motion/variable-speed playback, frame step play, and visible shuttle functions.

This was due to the fact that, unlike 1 inch type C which recorded one field per helical scan track on the tape, Type B segmented each field to 5 or 6 tracks per field according to whether it was a 525 (NTSC) or 625 (PAL) line machine.

The tape speed allowed 96 minutes on a large reel (later 120 minutes), and used 2 record/playback (R/P) heads on the drum rotating at 9000 RPM with a 190 degree wrap around a very small head drum, recording 52 video lines per head segment. Video is recorded on a FM signal with a bandwidth of 5.5 MHz. Three longitudinal audio tracks are recorded on the tape as well: two audio and one Linear timecode (LTC) track.

The picture quality was excellent, and standard R/P machines, digital frame store machines, reel-to-reel portables, random access cart machines (for playback of short-form video material such as television commercials), and portable cart versions were marketed.

Models introduced

  • BCN40 (1976, record unit with no TBC playback)
  • BCN50 (1976, recorder with TBC playback)
  • BCN20 (1976, portable with no TBC playback)
  • BCWQ ("L" Unit for BCN20/21, added TBC playback to the portable units)
  • Effects control option for digital framestore, for freeze frame, quad spilt and mirror effects (early digital Special effects).
  • BNC51 (recorder with TBC playback, optional Slow motion and visible shuttle)
  • BCN5 (26 1/2 pound, portable cart recorder)
  • BCN100 (random access cart machine, up to 16 hours rec/playback)
  • BCN52 (recorder with Digital TBC playback, with slow motion & visible shuttle)
  • BCN21 (lightweight reel to reel portable with no TBC playback, first composite VTR)
RCA also sold the BCN50 as a HR-400.

Special BCN units

  • Ruxton Video in Burbank (1970-1980s) used modified BCNs for 24 Frame playback to TVs used on movie studio sets. Thus the TVs had no flicker when seen on film, due to the film-compatible frame rate.
  • Image Transform in Universal City used specially modified BCNs to record 24-frame video also, but for their "Image Vision" system. The BCN would record and play back 24-frame video at 10Mhz bandwidth, with twice the standard 525-line NTSC resolution. To record this the headwheel and capstan ran at twice normal speed. Modified 24fps 10Mhz Bosch Fernseh KCK-40 professional video cameras were used on the set. This was a custom pre-HDTV video system. This recording could be recorded as film out on a modified 3M Electron Beam Recorder (EBR) for film. Image Transform had modified other gear for this process. At its peak, this system was used to make "Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl" in 1982. This was the first major use of early electronic cinema technology (using wideband high-resolution analog video technology, predating IT-based DI (digital intermediate) post production for film nowadays) using a film recorder for Film out.
  • Bell and Howell (later Rank Video Services) used special BCNs for mass VHS duplication. These specially-modified BCN VTRs could play back movies at two times the normal speed. In addition, the sync signals were also output at two times speed as well. For proper playback, the headwheel and capstan also ran at twice normal speed. Specially modified VHS recorders could record this video. In doing this, the duplication plant could output twice the product than normal videocassette duplicating systems.
  • Bell and Howell's Data Tape division in Pasadena, California modified BCNs to record high speed data for instrumentation purposes. These instrumentation recordings were mostly used by US government agencies, such as for NASA on the Space Shuttle. This unit could record data from up to 800 sensors.
  • Because of the small scanner, BCNs could record even at high g-forces. They could also record at low temperatures, down to -40c (-40 F). This was done at the Olympic Winter Games in Lake Placid (1980) and in Sarajevo (1984).
  • Some users modified BCNs to fit 2-hour reels of tape on the BCN, so complete 2-hour movies could fit on one reel of tape. Bosch later made this a factory option, and was designated as BCN LP.
  • Bosch also offered SLP BCN, a "long-play" variant of the format. It moved the tape at half speed so that up to 4 hours could be recorded on reel. This was mostly used for time zone tape delay by television networks.
  • One of the first Digital SDTV VTRs was a non-production prototype BCN deck that could record and play back early type of CCIR 601 digital signals. These two units paved the way for the later SMPTE D1 VTR standard.



BCN 20\40\50 Headwheel


Some BCN users

See also

External links

The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers or SMPTE, (IPA pronunciation: [sɪmpti] and sometimes [sʌmpti]
..... Click the link for more information.
The Fernseh AG television company was registered in Berlin on the 3rd July, 1929 by John Logie Baird, Robert Bosch and other partners[1] with an initial capital of 100,000 Reichsmark[2].
..... Click the link for more information.
Robert Bosch GmbH

GmbH
Founded 1886
Headquarters Gerlingen, Germany

Key people Robert Bosch, founder
Industry Automotive, Small appliance
Products Automotive parts, Power tools
Revenue $43,7 Billions (2006)
Net income $2,17 Billions (2006)
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1973 1974 1975 - 1976 - 1977 1978 1979

Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI
..... Click the link for more information.
1 inch Type C (designated Type C by SMPTE) is a professional helical scan open-reel videotape format co-developed and introduced by Ampex and Sony in 1976. It became the replacement in the professional video & television broadcast industries for the then incumbent Quadruplex (2
..... Click the link for more information.
1 inch Type C (designated Type C by SMPTE) is a professional helical scan open-reel videotape format co-developed and introduced by Ampex and Sony in 1976. It became the replacement in the professional video & television broadcast industries for the then incumbent Quadruplex (2
..... Click the link for more information.
Helical scan or striping is a method of recording higher bandwidth signals onto magnetic tape than would otherwise be possible at the same tape speed with fixed heads.
..... Click the link for more information.
This article needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling.
You can assist by [ editing it] now. A how-to guide is available, as is general .
This article has been tagged since October 2007.
..... Click the link for more information.
PAL, short for Phase Alternating Line, is a colour encoding system used in broadcast television systems in large parts of the world. Other common analogue television systems are SECAM and NTSC.
..... Click the link for more information.
Linear (or Longitudinal) Timecode (LTC) encodes SMPTE timecode data as a Manchester-Biphase encoded audio signal. The audio signal is commonly recorded on a VTR track or other storage media.
..... Click the link for more information.
A television advertisement, advert or commercial is a form of advertising in which goods, services, organizations, ideas, etc. are promoted via the medium of television.
..... Click the link for more information.
Time base correction is a technique to reduce or eliminate errors caused by mechanical instability present in analog recordings on mechanical media, including video tape recorders and videocassette recorders.
..... Click the link for more information.
special effects (a.k.a. SFX or SPFX). In modern films, special effects are usually used to alter previously-filmed elements by adding, removing or enhancing objects within the scene.
..... Click the link for more information.
Slow motion is a technique in filmmaking whereby time appears to be slowed down. It was invented by Austrian August Musger. Typically this is achieved when each film frame is captured at a rate much faster than it will be played back.
..... Click the link for more information.
A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), representing numbers or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous range of values (ie, as in an analog system).
..... Click the link for more information.
Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineered materials made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties and which remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within the finished structure.
..... Click the link for more information.
Burbank is both a common placename in English-speaking countries and a common surname (last name). The name Burbank is of English origin and means "lives on the castle's hill".
..... Click the link for more information.
A film frame, or just frame, is one of the many single photographic images in a motion picture. The individual frames are separated by frame lines. Normally, 24 frames are needed for one second of film.
..... Click the link for more information.
A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. This environment may be interior (sound stage), exterior (backlot), or both. In general parlance, the term is synonymous with "major film production company," due largely to the fact that the leading production
..... Click the link for more information.
Television (often abbreviated to TV, T.V., or more recently, tv; sometimes called telly, the tube, boob tube, or idiot box in British English) is a widely used telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures
..... Click the link for more information.
Flicker may mean:
  • Flicker (razor), women's disposable razor by ASR
  • Flicker (movie), intermittent darkening of projection screen
  • Northern Flicker, a type of woodpecker
  • Flicker, the original bass guitarist for the band Manic Street Preachers
  • Flicker

..... Click the link for more information.
Frame rate, or frame frequency, is the measurement of the frequency (rate) at which an imaging device produces unique consecutive images called frames. The term applies equally well to computer graphics, video cameras, film cameras, and motion capture systems.
..... Click the link for more information.
Universal City may refer to:
  • Universal City, California
  • Universal City, Texas

..... Click the link for more information.
This article needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling.
You can assist by [ editing it] now. A how-to guide is available, as is general .
This article has been tagged since October 2007.
..... Click the link for more information.
Capstan may refer to:
  • Capstan (nautical), rotating machine used to control or apply force to another element.
  • Capstan (tape recorder), rotating spindles used to move recording tape.
  • Capstan (cigarette), a brand of British cigarette.

..... Click the link for more information.
Professional video camera (often called a Television camera even though the use has spread) is a high-end device for recording electronic moving images (as opposed to a movie camera, that records the images on film).
..... Click the link for more information.
High-definition television (HDTV) is a digital television broadcasting system with a significantly higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL). While some early analog HDTV formats were broadcast in Europe and Japan, HDTV is usually broadcast digitally,
..... Click the link for more information.
Film-out is the process in the computer graphics, video and filmmaking disciplines of transferring images or animation from videotape or digital files to a traditional celluloid film print.
..... Click the link for more information.
Information technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is "the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware.
..... Click the link for more information.
Digital intermediate (often abbreviated as DI) describes the process of digitizing a motion picture and manipulating color and other image characteristics to change the look, and is usually the final creative adjustment to a movie before distribution in theaters.
..... Click the link for more information.


This article is copied from an article on Wikipedia.org - the free encyclopedia created and edited by online user community. The text was not checked or edited by anyone on our staff. Although the vast majority of the wikipedia encyclopedia articles provide accurate and timely information please do not assume the accuracy of any particular article. This article is distributed under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.