Albany, New York

City of Albany, New York
Downtown Albany as seen from the Corning Tower.
Motto: Assiduity
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Location in Albany County and the State of New York
Location in Albany County and the State of New York
Coordinates:
Country United States
State New York
County Albany
Founded 1614
Incorporated July 22, 1686
Government
 - Mayor Gerald D. Jennings (D)
Area
 - City  21.8 sq mi (56.6 km)
 - Land  21.4 sq mi (55.5 km)
 - Water  0.5 sq mi (1.2 km)
Elevation  200 ft (60 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 95,658
 - Density 5,488.1/sq mi (2118.4/km)
 - Metro 1,147,850
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 518
FIPS code 36-01000
GNIS feature ID 0977310
Website: [1]
Albany is the capital of the State of New York and the county seat of Albany County. Albany lies 136 miles (219 km) north of New York City, and slightly to the south of the juncture of the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers.[1] The city has a population of 93,963 (July 2006 est.).[2]

Albany has close ties with the nearby cities of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs, forming a region called the Capital District. This area makes up the bulk of the Albany-Schenectady-Troy Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) with a population of 850,957, making it the fourth largest urban area in New York State, and the 56th largest MSA in the United States.[3]

The Albany-Schenectady-Amsterdam, NY CSA, consists of the Albany-Schenectady-Troy MSA, the Glens Falls MSA, and the Amsterdam MSA. Using this definition, the area has a population (as of 2006) of 1,147,850, making it the third largest metropolitan area in New York State, and aside from New York City CSA, the only area that has shown any population growth. The Albany-Schenectady-Amsterdam, NY CSA is also the 36th largest in the nation.[4]

Albany is built on the site of the Dutch Fort Orange and its surrounding community of Beverwyck. The English acquired the site from the Dutch in 1664 and renamed it Albany, in honor of James II, Duke of Albany. A 1686 document issued by Thomas Dongan granted Albany its official charter.

Today, the city is a center of government and education.

History

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Albany, from Van-Unsselaens Island, by John Howard Hinton (1846)
Albany is the fourth oldest city (behind Santa Fe, St. Augustine, and Jamestown) and the second oldest state capital (behind Sante Fe) in the United States. The original native settlement in the area was called Penpotawotnot. Its colonial history began when Englishman Henry Hudson, exploring for the Dutch East India Company on the Halve Maen (or Half Moon), reached the area in 1609. In 1614, the Dutch company constructed Fort Nassau, its first fur trading post near present-day Albany and left Jacob Eelkens in charge. Commencement of the fur trade provoked hostility from the French colony in Canada and amongst the native tribes, who vied to control the trade. In 1624, Fort Orange was established in the area. Both forts were named in honor of the Dutch House of Orange-Nassau. Nearby areas were incorporated as the village of Beverwyck in 1652.

When the land was taken by the English in 1664, the name was changed to Albany, in honor of the Duke of York and Albany, who later became King James II of England and James VII of Scotland. Duke of Albany was a Scottish title given since 1398, generally to a younger son of the King of Scots. The name is ultimately derived from Alba, the Gaelic name for Scotland. Albany was formally chartered as a municipality by Governor Thomas Dongan on July 22, 1686. The "Dongan Charter"[5] was virtually identical in content to the charter awarded to New York City three months earlier. Pieter Schuyler was appointed first mayor of Albany the day the charter was signed.

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New York State Capitol Building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million was the most expensive government building of its time. Three teams of architects labored on it.
In 1754, representatives of seven British North American colonies met in the Albany Congress. Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania presented the Albany Plan of Union, the first formal proposal to unite the colonies. Although it was never adopted by Parliament, it was an important precursor to the U.S. Constitution. Albany native Philip Livingston was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. William Alexander, a general in the Revolutionary War, died in Albany in 1783. Several US Navy ships have since been named USS Albany in honor of the City's historical and military importance.

In 1777, the state capital of New York was moved from Kingston to Albany, about 50 miles north. The State Capitol building was constructed between 1867 and 1899 and inspired by the Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) in Paris, France. Notable architectural features include its "Million Dollar Staircase."

Albany's location on the Hudson River made it a center of transportation from the outset. In 1807, Robert Fulton initiated a steamboat line from New York City to Albany. On October 26, 1825 the Erie Canal was completed, forming a continuous water route from the Great Lakes to New York City. The Mohawk and Hudson Railroad between Albany and Schenectady, New York opened on September 24, 1831 and subsequently became part of the New York Central Railroad. Erastus Corning, a noted industrialist and founder of the New York Central, called Albany home and served as its mayor from 1834 to 1837. His great-grandson, Erastus Corning II, served as mayor of Albany from 1942 until 1983, the longest single mayoral term of any major city in the United States.



Between 1965 and 1978, the Empire State Plaza was constructed in Albany's Midtown, west of Downtown and south of the Capitol building. It was, and remains, controversial, in large part because it required the demolition of several historical neighborhoods and the forced removal of Black and Latino inhabitants. The Plaza was conceived by Governor Nelson Rockefeller and is now named in his honor. The Erastus Corning Tower stands 589 feet (180 meters) high and is the tallest building in New York State outside New York City. Four other smaller towers, the Legislative Office Building, the Cultural Education Center (which houses the State Library and Museum), the Justice Building, and the impressive performing arts center known as "The Egg" make up the rest of the Empire State Plaza. The design of the Empire State Plaza is based loosely on the National Congress complex in the Brazilian capital of Brasilia.

A number of north-south streets in Albany are named after birds (for instance, lark, dove, hawk, eagle, partridge, swan, etc.) At one point the east-west streets were named for animals, for instance- Lion (Washington Ave.), Fox (Sheridan Ave,), Deer (State Street west of Eagle), Wolf (Madison Ave.); the only ones to keep their animal names are Elk Street in the Sheridan Hollow neighborhood and Beaver Street downtown.

Modern day Albany consists of many neighborhoods with different characteristics.



Chester A. Arthur, 21st U.S. president, is buried in Albany Rural Cemetery in Menands, north of the city.

Geography

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The Albany skyline as viewed from across the Hudson River

Geography

Albany is located at (42.659829, -73.781339).GR1

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 21.8 mi² (56.6 km²). 21.4 mi² (55.5 km²) of it is land and 0.5 mi² (1.2 km²) of it (2.15%) is water. The Pine Bush, located on the far edge of the city with Guilderland and Colonie is the only sizable inland pine barrens and sand dunes in the United States and home to many endangered species including the Karner Blue butterfly. Four lakes exist within city limits, including Buckingham Lake, Rensselaer Lake, Tivoli Lake, and Washington Park Lake.

Climate

Albany has a humid continental climate, with cold, snowy winters, and hot, wet summers. Snowfall is significant, with annually about 63 inches, but much less than the lake-effect areas to the north and west. Albany is far enough from Lake Ontario to avoid significant lake-effect snows, but does receive some. Albany is close enough to the coast to receive heavy snow from Nor'Easters, and the city gets the bulk of its yearly snowfall from these types of storms. Winters are often very cold, with temperatures occasionally dropping below 0 °F (-18 °C). Summers in Albany can contain stretches of excessive heat and humidity, with temperatures above 90 F and dew points near 70. Severe thunderstorms are common, as the city is located in a conducive area for severe weather near the Mohawk Valley. Tornadoes are rare but not unheard of.

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F (°C) 65 (18.3)68 (20)89 (31.7)92 (33.3)94 (34.4)99 (37.2)100 (37.8)99 (37.2)100 (37.889 (31.7)82 (27.8)71 (21.7)
Norm High °F (°C) 31.1 (-.5)34.3 (1.3)44.5 (6.9)57.3 (14.1)69.8 (21)77.5 (25.3)82.2 (27.9)79.7 (26.5)71.3 (21.8)59.7 (15.4)47.5 (8.6)36 (2.2)
Norm Low °F (°C) 13.3 (-10.4)15.7 (-9.1)25.4 (-3.7)35.9 (2.2)46.5 (8.1)55 (12.8)60 (15.6)58.3 (14.6)49.9 (9.7)38.8 (3.8)30.8 (-0.7)20.1 (-6.6)
Rec Low °F (°C) -28 (-33.3)-21 (-29.4)-21 (-29.4)10 (-12.2)26 (-3.3)36 (2.2)40 (4.4)34 (1.1)24 (-4.4)16 (-8.9)5 (-15)-22 (-30)
Precip inch (mm) 2.71 (68.8)2.27 (57.7)3.17 (80.5)3.25 (82.6)3.67 (93.2)3.74 (95.0)3.5 (88.9)3.68 (93.5)3.31 (84.1)3.23 (82.0)3.31 (84.1)2.76 (70.1)
Source: USTravelWeather.com [2]

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 95,658 people, 40,709 households, and 18,400 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,474.6/mi² (1,727.5/km².) There were 45,288 housing units at an average density of 2,118.4/mi² (817.9/km².) The racial makeup of the city was 63.12% White, 28.14% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 3.26% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.15% from other races, and 2.98% from two or more races. 5.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 40,709 households out of which 22.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.3% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 54.8% were non-families. 41.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.95. The median home value in Albany, NY, is $217,100. Home appreciation is 12.70% over the last year. The median age of Albany, NY, real estate is 63 years.[6]

In the city the population was spread out with 20.0% under the age of 18, 19.3% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,375,[7] and the median income for a family was $39,932. Males had a median income of $31,535 versus $27,112 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,340. About 16.0% of families and 21.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.8% of those under age 18 and 12.5% of those age 65 or over.

Culture

Nightlife and entertainment

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The Egg, a performing arts center in the Empire State Plaza, is a major cultural attraction in Albany.
Albany's geographic situation as a "Crossroads City" (roughly equidistant between New York, Montreal, Buffalo and Boston) also makes it a convenient stop for nationally touring artists and acts. The Palace Theatre and The Egg provide mid-sized forums for music, theater and spoken word performances. The Times Union Center, previously the Knickerbocker Arena ("The Knick") and the Pepsi Arena, serves as the city's largest musical venue for nationally and internationally prominent bands, as well as trade shows, sporting events and other large-scale community gatherings. The New York State Museum is a major cultural draw in Albany, focusing on fine arts, natural history, and New York's economic, political and social histories.

In recent years, the city's government has invested marketing and financial resources to cultivate venues and neighborhoods that can attract after-hours business, as well as public art installations. Pearl Street, Broadway and Lark Street now serve as the most commercially active entertainment areas in the City. Lark Street is most closely identified with the City's contemporary cultural identity, and is often noted as being "Albany's Greenwich Village". Technically the westernmost border of the Center Square neighborhood and located one block east of Washington Park, Lark Street is home of many independent shops, coffee houses, restaurants, art galleries, antique shops, bars, and a tattoo parlor. Although the Southeastern most strip was rebuilt in 2002-2003 to place new roadways, trees, and sidewalks in front of the new shops in the active portion of Lark Street, some local residents have protested the neglect of the northwestern side of the street (crossing west of Central Avenue), which runs down into the less-affluent Arbor Hill neighborhood.

Summer concert series are sponsored by the City and local businesses at the Corning Preserve, Riverfront Park, Washington Park, Tricentennial Square and the Empire State Plaza. Metroland, the alternative newsweekly of the Capital Region, generally provides a focal point for previewing, reviewing and interviewing local artists and performers, as well as traveling events that pass through Albany.

Last call is at 4:00 AM in Albany, unlike the earlier 2:00 AM in most areas of the nation. This is often attributed to the historically high density of industrial facilities and the demand of second and third shift patrons. New York law allows bars to be open until 4:00 AM (However, local municipalities can override it to an earlier time.) This law was designed to accommodate the thriving late nightlife of New York City, but Albany has adopted it as well.

Festivals

  • The Tulip Festival, or the Tulip Fest as it is locally known, is set in Albany’s Washington Park. This traditional Albany event marks the beginning of spring as thousands of tulips bloom in the Park in early May. Tulip Fest is a celebration of Albany’s rich Dutch heritage, and draws both local and regional attendance.[8]
    • Lark Fest is an annual community festival that includes painters, photographers, jewelers, sculptors, ceramicists, glass artists and live shows on several stages. The event has an average attendance of 55,000 people, with peak attendance of 80,000 in 2006.<ref name="albanyevents" />
    • Alive at Five is a concert series held downtown on Thursdays throughout the summer. The concert series features local, regional and national artists and hosts different genres of music each week.
    • The African American Family Day Arts Festival takes place in early August and provides musical acts, cultural cuisine, and family entertainment.
    • Latin Fest offers Latin music, food and crafts every year in Washington Park.
    • The Albany Jazz Festival is held at the end of summer every year in the Albany Riverfront, Park Amphitheater.

    Artistic community

    Albany possesses an active artistic community and culture that is often regenerated by students at the region's colleges and universities, the region's many nonprofit cultural organizations, and by former residents of regional megalopolii such as Boston and New York relocating to take advantage of Albany's affordable, historic housing and commercial spaces. The Albany Symphony Orchestra, Capital Repertory Theatre [3], Albany Institute of History & Art and Palace Theatre provide outlets for locally composed, created and curated works, as well as traveling exhibitions and shows. There are several small, private art galleries and antiquarian book shops in Albany, mainly clustered around Lark Street between Washington Avenue and Madison Avenue. Also on Lark Street there is the annual Art on Lark, an outdoor sidewalk gallery featuring artists exhibiting and demonstrating their original work. This annual Sidewalk Art Show and Sale celebrates local artists and musicians.<ref name="albanyevents" /> Albany also has one independent film theater (the Spectrum 8), one chain theater (The Madison)[4], as well as performing and fine arts venues associated with the University at Albany and College of St. Rose.

    Albany is home to a large and important collection of modern art. The Empire State Plaza Art Collection, which belongs to the public of New York State, includes works by Alexander Calder, Robert Motherwell and Jackson Pollock. Much of the collection features the work of artists who practiced in New York in the 1960s and 1970s, who were known as the New York School. Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, has called the collection "the most important State collection of modern art in the country."[9]

    Albany is sometimes referred as "Smallbany," with varying degrees of affection or derision.[10] Local media have reported on the "Smallbany mentality" and its effects, both positive and negative, on the local arts and music communities.[11] The Smallbany concept may be reinforced by common derisive references to Albany as a provincial backwater in sitcom or film scripts. (See Albany in Popular Culture).

    Civil Rights Movement

    The Brothers group was organized by Leon Van Dyke, a civil rights activist who tended to the needs of Black communities. Publishing "The Liberator," a local newspaper from 1967-1972, The Brothers were active before and during the Black Panther Party's Albany chapter. Both groups shared offices on the same street. The Black Panther Party opened a chapter on 170 North Diamond, November 10, 1969. The Party emphasized a free children's breakfast program, lead poisoning testing, as well as free clinics, clothing and food drives for all poor communities. The Black Panther Party was active in Albany from 1969 through 1971 and influenced city officials to adopt all of its survival programs after noting its success within the community.[12]

    Notable residents

    Government and politics

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    Albany City Hall was completed in 1883.
    From Albany's formal organization in 1686 until 1779, mayors of Albany were appointed by the royal governor of New York, per the provisions of the original City Charter. From 1779 until 1839, mayors were chosen by the New York State's Council of Appointment, typically for a one year term that began in September. After 1840, Albany's mayors were directly elected by the city's residents. Albany has had 74 mayors since its inception. Gerald D. Jennings is the current Democratic mayor; he was first elected in 1993 and is currently serving in his fourth term of office. He is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition[14], a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    No Republican has been elected since 1921. 60.68% of the people in Albany are registered as Democrats. 37.28% are registered Republican. Remaining are independent: 2.04%.[15]

    Albany has been dominated by the Democratic Party since the 1920s, although the local branch was more moderate than the national party, being made up of mainly working-class Catholic families. Daniel P. O'Connell established a political machine in the city with the election of William Stormont Hackett in 1922. O'Connell's operation survived well into the 1980s, as the machine put forth candidates which the electorate dutifully voted for. Mayor Gerald D. Jennings' shocking upset in the 1993 Democratic mayoral primary over Harold Joyce, who had the Democratic Party’s formal endorsement and had only recently been its chairman, is often cited as the end of the O'Connell machine era in Albany. More recently, David Soares' 2004 election as District Attorney has similarly been seen as a breaking of the mold, as Soares was not the favored candidate of the local Democratic Party. Although its founding base Catholics have shifted toward the Republican Party in recent decades, Albany continues to be dominated by the Democratic party.

    Architecture

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    The Erastus Corning Tower flanked by The Egg. Both are part of the Empire State Plaza
    • The Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza (commonly known as simply the Empire State Plaza or The South Mall) is a large complex of several state-owned buildings downtown, including The Egg, Corning Tower, and Cultural Education Center (home of the New York State Museum).
    • Albany City Hall is the city's seat of government. It houses the office of the mayor, the Common Council chamber, and the City and Traffic Courts. Designed by Henry Hobson Richardson in his trademark Richardson Romanesque style, the granite building was constructed between 1880 and 1883. Albany City Hall is known for its pyramidal-roofed clock tower, which contains the nation's first municipal carillon. The largest of the instrument's 60 bells weighs 11,200 pounds, and the carillon is still played regularly.
    • The New York State Capitol is the capitol building of the state of New York. Housing the New York Legislature, it is located in on State Street in Capitol Park. The building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million (roughly half a billion current dollars), was the most expensive government building of its time. It is a National Historic Landmark. The Capitol was constructed between 1867 and 1899 and inspired by the Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) in Paris, France. It is one of only ten capitol buildings in the United States that does not have a dome.
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    The New York State Capitol viewed from the east, with the Alfred E. Smith Building in the background
    • The Alfred E. Smith Building, officially known as the Alfred E. Smith State Office Building and sometimes called simply the Smith Building, is a structure located in downtown Albany across the street from the New York State Capitol and One Commerce Plaza. The building's namesake, Alfred Emmanuel Smith, was a four-term governor of New York State and the Democratic Party's nomination for the 1928 Presidential Election. The Art Deco skyscraper has 34 stories and at 388 feet (118 meters) is Albany's second tallest structure (after the Erastus Corning Tower). Completed in 1928, it houses offices of the New York State government. The building underwent an extensive renovation that began in 2002. This modernization, which cost at least $103 million, is now finished. Perhaps one of the most notable features of this building is the carving of all of the state's counties' names scrolling around the entire building.
    • The Home Savings Bank Building and One Commerce Plaza are among downtown Albany's other high-rises.
    • The Quackenbush House is Albany's oldest standing building (circa 1736), when built it actually sat just outside the city limits (which was at Clinton Ave.). Schuyler Mansion is the popular, modern-day name for a large brick edifice built just inside Albany's southern boundary line in 1761. Situated on a large and commanding stretch of land, this Albany landmark was the home of General Philip John Schuyler. Other historic mansions include the Ten Broeck in Arbor Hill and the Cherry Hill on South Pearl Street.
    • Originally an Army National Guard armory, the Washington Avenue Armory Sports and Convention Arena is a mid-size venues for sports, entertainment and business. It is home of the Albany Patroons of the Continental Basketball Association and United States Basketball League.

    Recreational areas

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    A sunset over Buckingham Lake
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    Winter in Washington Park
    • Washington Park is recognized as one of New York State's oldest city parks.[16] The Park was officially organized in 1809, but its current location has been used as a recreational site for well over 300 years.[17] Washington Park's current layout was designed in 1868 by Frederick Law Olmsted. It was opened for the public use in 1871.[18] Frederick W. Brown's Lake House was added in 1876.[16] Previously it had been a cemetery and when the made it into a park they moved the graves to Albany Rural.
    • Lincoln Park was organized in 1886. It was originally known as Delaware Square and later as Beaver Park. [19] Today, the park has a pool that is open to city residents during the summer months.
    • The Pine Bush is the only sizable inland pine barrens sand dunes in the United States, and is recognized as a unique pine barrens ecosystem. It contains over 300 species of vertebrate animals, over 1,500 species of plants, and over 10,000 species of insects and other invertebrate animals. Many of them are rare and restricted to the Pine Bush habitat. The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is sung by the Indian brave from the Vale of Tawasentha located in the Pine Bush. George Washington wrote of the Pine Bush in his diaries while traveling in upstate New York during the Revolutionary War. In Moby Dick, Herman Melville describes the dark beauty of the Pine Bush in a long account of a stage coach ride from Albany to Schenectady.
    • Albany Riverfront Park at the Corning Preserve is home to an 800-seat amphitheatre which hosts numerous events from Spring through Fall. In addition, a visitors center houses an explanation of the Hudson River’s tides. The park also features a bike trail and boat launch.
    • Buckingham Lake Park contains a pond with fountains, a footpath, a playground, and picnic tables.

    Education

    The Albany City School District enrolls about 10,000 students. It includes Albany High School, the city's public high school. The district also includes the Abrookin Vo-Tech Center High School and Harriet Gibbons High School for 9th Graders.[20] The district also has 11 elementary schools and 3 middle schools. Albany public schools spend $9,227 per student. The average school expenditure in the U.S. is $6,058. There are about 13.7 students per teacher in Albany.[21] The city is also home to six charter schools. [22], with three more planned in the coming years.
    Further information: list of high schools

    Media

    The Albany Times Union is Albany's primary daily paper and the only one based close to the City; its headquarters have been located in nearby Colonie since the 1970s after a dispute over land needed for expansion with then-Mayor Erastus Corning 2nd. The newspaper celebrated its 150th year of publishing in 2006. Serving Albany to a lesser degree are the Daily Gazette (which focuses primarily on Schenectady) and Troy Record. Metroland is the most notable alternative newsweekly in the area, publishing each Thursday, while The Business Review (nee Capital District Business Review) is a business weekly published each Friday.
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    Downtown Albany viewed from across the Hudson River
    In terms of broadcast media, Albany is considered a medium market (Arbitron market 64 in radio, Nielsen market 55 in television), however the market has several traits which set it apart. The pioneering influence of General Electric in nearby Schenectady directly contributed to the area emerging as the birthplace of station-based television (WRGB) and one of the earliest FM radio stations (today's WRVE), in addition to a powerful 50,000 watt AM station (WGY). In addition, in the early 2000s the greater Albany market was considered to have the highest concentration of FM stations east of the Mississippi River.

    The Albany Metro area has affiliates of many of the major television networks including WRGB-CBS (the world's first television station), WTEN-ABC, WNYT-NBC, WXXA-FOX, WMHT-PBS,WCWN-CW, WNYA-My Network TV, and WYPX-i, although it should be noted that the last two are not real stations only television programming by remote satellite control. In addition, the area has a cable-only news channel, Capital News 9, which features local news 24/7. On the radio side, the Capital Region has two News/Talk radio stations, WGY and WROW on the AM band. Both feature a mixture of local and syndicated programming. There are also 2 Sports Talk stations, WOFX, which features some FOX Sports Radio programming, local programming, and Play-by-Play, and WTMM, an affiliate of ESPN Radio. In addition, WAMC, aka Northeast Public Radio, is an NPR affiliate which serves the Albany area. The market was one of the few that possesses a female-oriented talk radio station in WEEV, however the station reverted back to a sports talk station as of 8/18/2007. (Information from www.fybush.com and call sign information based on FCC records)

    Transportation

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    A line of CDTA buses on State Street

    Sports

    NCAA college athletic programs

    • University at Albany: Currently plays at the Division I level in all of its sports, though for most of its history it was a Division III school, with a brief stay at the Division II level in the late 1990s. The football team is a member of the Division I-AA Northeast Conference, while all other sports teams play as members of the America East Conference. In 2006, UAlbany became the first SUNY affiliated school to send a team to the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament, where the 16th seeded Great Danes held an 11-point lead late in the second half over top seeded Connecticut, to whom they ultimately lost. UAlbany returned to the Tournament in 2007, losing in the opening round of the South Region to fourth-seeded Virginia. The men's Lacrosse team has also made multiple appearances in its sport's NCAA Division I Championship Tournament, the first University at Albany team to do so. UAlbany has hosted the New York Giants summer training camp since 1996.
    • The College of Saint Rose: The St. Rose Golden Knights play at the Division II level. They have consistent and significant post-season success in Men's and Women's Basketball and Baseball. St. Rose plays in the Northeast Ten Conference.
    • Nearby Siena College, located in the Albany suburb of Loudonville, plays at the Division I level in all sports, although it discontinued its Division I-AA football program in 2003. It is a member of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference for most sports, with field hockey playing as a member of the Northeast Conference. In many sports, including the basketball team, play home games within the city of Albany.

    Minor league professional teams

    Defunct professional teams

    Times Union Center

    The Times Union Center (originally named the Knickerbocker Arena and later the Pepsi Arena) is a major regional athletic venue located in downtown Albany. It has a seating capacity of up to 17,500 for sporting events. The Siena College Men's Basketball team plays its home games there, and the Center is also home to the Albany River Rats (AHL) and Albany Conquest (af2). The Times Union Center has hosted NCAA Division I hockey and basketball postseason tournaments, among many other sporting events. In May 2006, the Times Union acquired naming rights to the facility, beginning in 2007. From 1998 and through 2006, it was known as the Pepsi Arena.

    In popular culture

    Albany has appeared in popular culture a number of times, including:

    Albany and its environs ranked against other cities

    • According to a study conducted by the Acxiom Corp., Albany and its environs are the top-ranked standard test market for new business and retail products, because its population mirrors the characteristics of the U.S. consumer population as a whole more than any other. [25] (2004)
    • Forbes ranked Albany-Schenectady-Troy as the third best place in the country with the best education and named Albany a Top IQ Campus as part of its 150 Places to Live Rich. (2005)
    • Albany-Schenectady-Troy is one of the healthiest communities in the nation according to Self Magazine. (2006)
    • Small Times magazine ranked University at Albany's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering as the best in the country for micro and nanotechnology. The school was tops in education, facilities and industry outreach. (2006)
    • MSN Money named Albany-Schenectady-Troy as the seventh fastest-growing region that is still cheap. (2005)
    • Popular Science named Albany among its top cities for technology. (2005)
    • Crystal IS made Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 – a ranking of the fastest growing tech companies in the U.S. On2 Technologies, Albany Molecular Research and AngioDynamics are among the fastest growing New York companies. CORESense, Inc. was named New York’s Rising Star Award Winner. (2005)
    • Albany Molecular Research and Intermagnetics General both made Red Herring’s Small Cap 100 list for bioscience. (2005)
    • The American Institute of Architects named Albany as one of five communities in the country that will participate in a program that helps local leaders and residents plan for a sustainable future through affordable housing, green buildings, walkable neighborhoods and other efforts, the city announced Wednesday.
    • Forbes ranked Albany the 18th best place to live and do business. (2006)
    • Forbes ranked Albany the 30th best place for work. (2006)
    • Forbes ranked Albany the 6th best housing market in the US.[26] (2007)

    Sister cities

    Albany has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International.(SCI):[27]

    See also

    References

    1. ^ City Data.com. "Albany, New York". 
    2. ^ [5]
    3. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas", 2006-07-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-14. 
    4. ^ US Census CBSA Estimates 2006
    5. ^ The Dongan Charter, New York State Museum
    6. ^ Sperling's Best Places: Albany NY real estate resources
    7. ^ Sperling's Best Places: Albany, NY economic resources
    8. ^ Albany Special Events (HTML). City of Albany Office of Special Events & Volunteer Services. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.

9. ^ Lowry, Glenn D.. Introduction to the Collection. New York Office of General Services.
10. ^ Business Journal (Albany)'': "Nanotechnology makes Smallbany the place to be" December 27, 2002
11. ^ Metroland: Local Music Guide 2002
12. ^ [6]
13. ^ [7]
14. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members.
15. ^ Sperling's Best Places: Albany NY Voting
16. ^ [8]
17. ^ [9]
18. ^ [10]
19. ^ [11]
20. ^ Sperling's Best Places: Albany NY schools
21. ^ Sperling's Best Places: Albany NY (overview)
22. ^ Sperlings Best Places: Albany NY Charter Schools
23. ^ [12]
24. ^ [13]
25. ^ [14]
26. ^ [http://www.forbes.com/2007/05/15/homes-housing-america-forbeslife-cx_mw_0515housingbest_slide_8.html Forbes: Best U.S> Housing Markets]
27. ^ "Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI)." Retrieved June 3, 2006.

External links


Albany is a word derived from Alba, the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland. It is also the archaic name for Albania. The term may refer to:

Locations

In Australia:
  • Albany, Western Australia

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Coat of arms elements
A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization.
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Albany County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, generally located in the vicinity of Albany, New York, the capital of New York State. Albany is also the county seat of Albany County.
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State of New York

Flag of New York Seal
Nickname(s): The Empire State
Motto(s): Excelsior!

Official language(s) None

Capital Albany
Largest city New York City

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country, state, and nation can have various meanings. Therefore, diverse lists of these entities are possible. Wikipedia offers the following lists:

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Motto
"In God We Trust"   (since 1956)
"E Pluribus Unum"   ("From Many, One"; Latin, traditional)
Anthem
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United States of America

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State of New York

Flag of New York Seal
Nickname(s): The Empire State
Motto(s): Excelsior!

Official language(s) None

Capital Albany
Largest city New York City

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State of New York
Albany (capital)
History | Geography | Education |
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Albany County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, generally located in the vicinity of Albany, New York, the capital of New York State. Albany is also the county seat of Albany County.
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A municipal corporation is a legal definition for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, charter townships, villages, and boroughs.
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July 22 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events


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8th century - 9th century - 10th century
850s  860s  870s  - 880s -  890s  900s  910s
885 886 887 - 888 - 889 890 891

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Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning "larger", "greater") is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer.

In many systems, the mayor is an elected politician who serves as chief executive and/or ceremonial official of many types of
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Gerald David "Jerry" Jennings (b. 1948 in Albany, NY) is the mayor of Albany, New York, United States. A Democrat, Jennings won a shocking upset in the 1993 mayoral primary over Harold Joyce, who had the Democratic Party’s formal endorsement and had only recently been its
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United States of America

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Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. The term Surface area is the summation of the areas of the exposed sides of an object.

Units

Units for measuring surface area include:
square metre = SI derived unit

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city is an urban settlement with a particularly important status which differentiates it from a town.

City is primarily used to designate an urban settlement with a large population. However, city may also indicate a special administrative, legal, or historical status.
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square mile is an imperial and US unit of area equal the area of a square of one statute mile. It should not be confused with the archaic miles square, which refers to the number of miles on each side squared.
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elevation of a geographic location is its height above a fixed reference point, often the mean sea level. Elevation, or geometric height, is mainly used when referring to points on the Earth's surface, while altitude or geopotential height
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1 foot =
SI units
0 m 0 mm
US customary / Imperial units
0 yd 0 in
A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes,
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1 metre =
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1000 mm 0 cm
US customary / Imperial units
0 ft 0 in
The metre or meter[1](symbol: m) is the fundamental unit of length in the International System of Units (SI).
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city is an urban settlement with a particularly important status which differentiates it from a town.

City is primarily used to designate an urban settlement with a large population. However, city may also indicate a special administrative, legal, or historical status.
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Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. It is frequently applied to living organisms, humans in particular.

Biological population densities


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metropolitan area is a large population centre consisting of a large metropolis and its adjacent zone of influence, or of more than one closely adjoining neighboring central cities and their zone of influence.
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time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. Most adjacent time zones are exactly one hour apart, and by convention compute their local time as an offset from UTC (see also Greenwich Mean Time).
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Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. Its time offset is UTC-5 during standard time and UTC-4 during daylight saving time.
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UTC−5 is the time offset used in the North American Central Time Zone during Daylight Saving Time.

For North America see also Eastern Standard Time and Central Daylight Time.
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Daylight saving time (DST; also summer time in British English) is the convention of advancing clocks so that afternoons have more daylight and mornings have less.
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Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. Its time offset is UTC-5 during standard time and UTC-4 during daylight saving time.
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