Andrei Rublev (film)

Andrei Rublev
Directed byAndrei Tarkovsky
Produced byTamara Ogorodnikova
Written byAndrei Konchalovsky
Andrei Tarkovsky
StarringAnatoli Solonitsyn
Ivan Lapikov
Nikolai Grinko
Nikolai Burlyayev
Mikhail Kononov
Music byVyacheslav Ovchinnikov
CinematographyVadim Yusov
Release date(s)1969 (Cannes)
1971 (official USSR)
Running time205 min. (Director's Cut)
185 min. (1971 release)
CountryUSSR
LanguageRussian / Italian
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile
Andrei Rublev (Russian Андрей Рублёв), also known as The Passion of Andrei, is a film made by Andrei Tarkovsky for Mosfilm in the Soviet Union in 1966. It is loosely based on the life of Andrei Rublev, the great 15th century Russian icon painter. Andrei is played by Anatoly Solonitsyn; one of his ancestors was himself an icon-painter, and he was tremendously proud to pass the auditions, as he had limited acting experience.

The script was written by Tarkovsky and Andrei Konchalovsky. The film is for the most part in black and white, except for the last few minutes, which are in color, showing details of several of Rublev's icons.

Characters

No less than eight characters are artists who have different approaches to self-expression and creativity.
  • Andrei Rublev – also the observer and “everyman” – humanistic, passionate, searches for the good in people, wants to inspire, not frighten. Interested in perceiving all aspects of existence.
  • Daniil Chyorny – withdrawn, resigned, not as bent on creativity as self-realization/path to enlightenment. Eventually disappears.
  • Kirill – Lacks talent, yet strives to achieve prominence. Jealous, self-righteous, very intelligent and perceptive.
  • Feofan Grek – An established master, cynical, disillusioned, regards art as more of a craft/chore.
  • Boriska – son of the bell-caster. He is aware of both his own importance and the difficult task at hand. Arrogant and persuasive yet humble and insecure. Is able to create through a combination of natural skill and pure faith.
  • Serega – Andrei's apprentice. A practical-minded “commercial” artist with no internal dilemmas, but contemplative enough to get along with Andrei.
  • The Balloonist – a daring escapist, literally and figuratively.
  • Skomorokh – a bitterly sarcastic “enemy of the state”, who, along with his scathing/obscene social commentary/criticism is just earning a living.

Historical accuracy

Andrei Rublev was not intended to be directly biographical; little is known about Andrei Rublev and several historical facts were changed for the movie. Andrei is rather an observer who looks on upon the events in the movie, especially evident in the sequences centered on the casting of the bell towards the end of the movie, where Andrei plays the role of observer and is not central to the scenes.

Details of everyday medieval life are conveyed mainly through naturalistic and lyrical images, not exposition. The film is well-researched not in terms of specific events but in terms of general lifestyle and customs.

Appropriately for a medieval setting, religion takes center stage, and references to the Bible abound, as it was the primary text known to the population. There is a complex outlook on Christianity and the Church - both positive and negative aspects are perceived by the characters and discussed.

The spoken language is natural, not artificial or “scripted” – it is crude and primitive. Although not ancient Russian, it is mostly authentic (some of the words, however, are anachronistic and have European roots: “interesno”, “forma”, “sekret”).

All foreign languages (Mongol, Italian) are spoken in the original. Tarkovsky’s love of the Renaissance and Italy gets a tongue-in-cheek reference with the presence of “Italian Ambassadors” in the climactic scene.

Cinematic techniques

Many varied shots, including overhead crane shots are used. Long, fluid takes are favored over quick cuts. Fantasy sequences (of two different characters) and flashbacks are also used. Sequences are extended to allow viewer reflection.

Much of the cinematography is directly influenced by Akira Kurosawa, including the importance of the weather, shots of water, and composition. Slow motion, which was still very rare in cinema (to be famously utilized by Peckinpah a few years later), is also borrowed from Kurosawa.

There are many allusions to medieval and early renaissance painting, especially Brueghel – landscapes with peasants, the Calvary procession, composition of the crowd scenes, depiction of atrocities, etc.

The music score consists of mostly low-key, choral vocalizing and gains presence only during the final color sequence.

Alternate versions

Because of the movie's religious themes and political ambiguity, it was unreleased in the Soviet Union for years after it was completed. Initially, it was completed in 1966 in a 205 minute version, but was not "officially" released until 1971, with about 20 minutes of material cut. Because of this, there are several different versions, of varying lengths.

Some sources say that Tarkovsky, who was adamant about getting his films seen the way he wanted to, endorsed the cut of 20 minutes. This was the version that played in the USSR and Western Europe for many years. When it reached the U.S., it was cut by another 40 minutes, making it an incoherent mess in the eyes of many frustrated critics.

The Criterion Collection DVD is known as the director's cut. It is the original, 205 minute version. The editor, Lyudmila Feiginova, supposedly kept a print of this version under her bed. It is the longest cut available on DVD and is generally accepted as the director's cut, although some still dispute this.

Controversy

Several scenes within the film depict animal cruelty, but only one featured real physical harm to an animal, in the scene when a horse falls from a flight of stairs and is then stabbed by a spear. To produce the scene, the horse was shot in the neck before hand and once more afterwards in the head. This was done to avoid potentially harming a stunt horse—the horse was brought in from a slaughterhouse, killed on set, and then returned to the slaughterhouse for commercial consumption.

In a 1967 interview for Literaturnoe obozrenie, interviewer Aleksandr Lipkov noted, "the cruelty in the film is shown precisely to shock and stun the viewers. And this may even repel them." Tarkovsky responded: "No, I don't agree. This does not hinder viewer perception. Moreover we did all this quite sensitively. I can name films that show much more cruel things, compared to which ours looks quite modest."[1]

In the scene of the Tatar raid, there is a sequence of a cow set on fire. The cow actually had an asbestos-covered coat and was not harmed during the scene.

Gallery


Criterion Collection DVD cover

VHS cover

A peasant flies a hot-air balloon, in the opening scene of Andrei Rublev


See also

References

Books

External links

Andrei Tarkovsky

Birth name Andrei Arsenyevich Tarkovsky
Born March 4 1932(1932--)
Zavrazhye, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Died November 29 1986 (aged 54)
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Andrey Sergeyevich Mikhalkov-Konchalovsky (Russian: Андре́й Серге́евич
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Andrei Tarkovsky

Birth name Andrei Arsenyevich Tarkovsky
Born March 4 1932(1932--)
Zavrazhye, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Died November 29 1986 (aged 54)
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Anatoly Solonitsyn (also 'Anatoli'; Russian: Анато́лий Алексе́евич
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Nikolai Petrovich Burlyayev

Nikolai Burlyayev as "Ivan" in Ivan's Childhood

Born March 8 1946 (1946--) (age 61)
Moscow, Soviet Union
Died
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Mikhail Ivanovich Kononov (Russian: Михаи́л Ива́нович Ко́нонов
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-1969- 1970 1971 1972  1973 .  1974 .  1975 .  1976  . 1977  . 1978  . 1979 

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-1971- 1972 1973 1974  1975 .  1976 .  1977 .  1978  . 1979  . 1980  . 1981 
In home video: 1968 1969 1970 -1971- 1972 1973 1974     
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A director's cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the director's own approved edit.
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Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (abbreviated USSR, Russian: ; tr.
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Russian}}} 
Writing system: Cyrillic (Russian variant)  
Official status
Official language of:  Abkhazia (Georgia)
 Belarus
 Commonwealth of Independent States (working)
 Crimea (de facto; Ukraine)
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Italian}}} 
Official status
Official language of:  European Union
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Russian}}} 
Writing system: Cyrillic (Russian variant)  
Official status
Official language of:  Abkhazia (Georgia)
 Belarus
 Commonwealth of Independent States (working)
 Crimea (de facto; Ukraine)
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Andrei Tarkovsky

Birth name Andrei Arsenyevich Tarkovsky
Born March 4 1932(1932--)
Zavrazhye, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
Died November 29 1986 (aged 54)
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Kinostudiya MosFilm

Corporation
Founded 1920
Headquarters Moscow, Russia

Key people Karen Shakhnazarov (Chairman)
Industry Motion pictures
Products Motion pictures
Television programs
Employees 1,500
Website [1]


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Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (abbreviated USSR, Russian: ; tr.
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1930s  1940s  1950s  - 1960s -  1970s  1980s  1990s
1963 1964 1965 - 1966 - 1967 1968 1969

Year 1966 (MCMLXVI
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Andrei Rublev (Andrey Rublev, Andrey Roublyov, Russian: Андре́й Рублёв) (c.1360 or 1370 - 1427 or January 29, 1430) is considered to be the greatest medieval Russian painter of icons and frescoes.
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15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500.

Events

  • 1402: Ottoman and Timurid Empires fight at the Battle of Ankara resulting in Timur's capture of Bayezid I.
  • 1402: The conquest of the Canary Islands signals the beginning of the Spanish Empire.

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Iconography is the branch of art history which studies the identification, description, and the interpretation of the content of images. The word iconography literally means "image writing", or painting, and comes from the Greek
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Anatoly Solonitsyn (also 'Anatoli'; Russian: Анато́лий Алексе́евич
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Andrey Sergeyevich Mikhalkov-Konchalovsky (Russian: Андре́й Серге́евич
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Black-and-white is a broad adjectival term used to describe a number of monochrome forms of visual arts. Most forms of visual technology start out in black and white, then slowly evolve into color as technology progresses.
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Daniil Chyorny (Russian: Даниил Чёрный) (c. 1360 – 1430) was a Russian iconographer.
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Theophanes the Greek or Feofan Grek (Russian: Феофан Грек; c. 1340 – c.
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skomorokhs (Sing. скоморох in Russian, скоморохъ in Old East Slavic, скоморaхъ in Church Slavonic, skomroszny
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Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet]] A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a
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Christianity

Foundations
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History of Christianity Timeline
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Old Testament New Testament
Books Canon Apocrypha
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Mongols (Mongolian: Монгол Mongol) specifies one or several ethnic groups largely located now in Mongolia, China, and Russia.
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Italian}}} 
Official status
Official language of:  European Union
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Vatican City
Sovereign Military Order of Malta

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