Battle of Chrysopolis

Battle of Chrysopolis
Part of Wars of Constantine I

Image of Constantine
Date18 September,324 [1]
LocationChrysopolis, near Chalcedon
ResultConstantinian victory
Combatants
Constantine ILicinius
Commanders
ConstantineLicinius


The Battle of Chrysopolis was fought on 18 September 324 in Chrysopolis (Üsküdar), near Chalcedon (Kadıköy), between Constantine I and Licinius. The defeat of Licinius left Constantine the only emperor, and thus ended the Tetrarchy.

The battle was the final encounter between the two emperors, since Licinius was withdrawing to Bithynia after the defeat in the naval Battle of Hellespont by hand of Crispus, Constantine's son and caesar.[2] [3]

Result

In 324, Constantine defeated his last foe, Licinius, in a battle at Chrysopolis, and became sole emperor of the Roman empire. He came to the east as a liberator, establishing peace for pagan and Christian alike and chose the city of Byzantium as his new capital. [4]

Soon after his victory in AD 324, he outlawed pagan sacrifices, now feeling far more at liberty to enforce his new religious policy. The treasures of pagan temples were confiscated and used to pay for the construction of new Christian churches. Gladiatorial contests were outlawed and harsh new laws were issued prohibiting sexual immorality. Jews, in particular, were forbidden from owning Christian slaves.

The battle also opened the prisons throughout the east, and set free all who were suffering for their Christian faith.[5]

References

1. ^ Ossius of Cordova: A Contribution to the History of the Constantinian Period - Page 186 by Victor Cyril De Clercq
2. ^ Faith and Practice in the Early Church: Foundations for Contemporary Theology - Page 201 by Carl A. Volz
3. ^ History of the Later Roman Empire, Ad 284-622 Lpc: AD 285-476 - Page 66 by Stephen [VNV] Mitchell
4. ^ Divine Heiress: the Virgin Mary and the creation of Christian Constantinople - Page 9 by Vasiliki Limberis
5. ^ Constantine the Great and the Christian Revolution (1930) - Page 226 by G. P. Baker

See also

September 18 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 96 - Nerva is proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian is assassinated.

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4th century · 5th century
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321 322 323 324 325 326 327
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Chalcedon (Χαλκηδών, sometimes transliterated as Chalkedon) was an ancient maritime town of Bithynia, in Asia Minor, almost directly opposite Byzantium, south of Scutari (modern Üsküdar).
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Constantine I
Emperor of the Roman Empire

Head of Constantine's colossal statue at the Capitoline Museums
Reign 306 - 312 (hailed as Augustus in the West, officially made Caesar by Galerius with Severus as Augustus, by agreement with Maximian, refused
..... Click the link for more information.
Licinius
Augustus in the East

Coin featuring Licinius
Reign 11 November 308 - 311 (as Augustus in the west, with Galerius in the east);
311 - 313 (joint Augustus with Maximinus)
..... Click the link for more information.
Constantine I
Emperor of the Roman Empire

Head of Constantine's colossal statue at the Capitoline Museums
Reign 306 - 312 (hailed as Augustus in the West, officially made Caesar by Galerius with Severus as Augustus, by agreement with Maximian, refused
..... Click the link for more information.
Battle of Turin was fought in 312 between Constantine and the troops his rival for the purple, Maxentius. Constantine won this battle near Turin, and went on to win his more famous victory at Milvian Bridge.
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Battle of Verona was fought in 312 between the forces of Constantine I and Maxentius. Maxentius's forces were defeated, and Ruricius Pompeianus, one of his commanders, was killed in the fighting.
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Battle of the Milvian Bridge took place on October 28, 312, between the Roman Emperors Constantine I and Maxentius. Constantine won the battle and started on the path that led him to end the Tetrarchy and become the only ruler of the Roman Empire.
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Battle of Cibalae was fought on October 8, 314 (or perhaps as late as 316, the chronology is spotty), between the forces of Constantine I and Licinius, roughly 200 miles within the territory of Licinius. Constantine won a decisive victory despite being outnumbered.
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Battle of Mardia, also known as Battle of Campus Ardiensis, was fought in late 316/early 317 between the forces of Roman Emperors Constantine I and Licinius. Constantine won the battle, and, according to a peace signed on 1 March 317, Licinius ceded territory to him, and had
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Battle of Adrianople was fought on July 3, 324 between the armies of Constantine I and Licinius.

Constantine and his army were chasing some Sarmatians that had crossed over the Danube River into Licinius's territory. This was obviously meant to provoke Licinius into battle.
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Battle of the Hellespont was fought in 324 between a Constantinian fleet led by Flavius Julius Crispus and a larger fleet loyal to Licinius. Despite being outnumbered, Crispus won the day.
..... Click the link for more information.
September 18 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 96 - Nerva is proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian is assassinated.

..... Click the link for more information.
4th century · 5th century
290s 300s 310s 320s 330s 340s 350s
321 322 323 324 325 326 327
..... Click the link for more information.
Üsküdar is a large and densely populated suburb of Istanbul, on the Anatolian shore of the Bosphorus right opposite the heart of the great city, next to Kadıköy. It is home to about half a million people.
..... Click the link for more information.
Üsküdar is a large and densely populated suburb of Istanbul, on the Anatolian shore of the Bosphorus right opposite the heart of the great city, next to Kadıköy. It is home to about half a million people.
..... Click the link for more information.
Chalcedon (Χαλκηδών, sometimes transliterated as Chalkedon) was an ancient maritime town of Bithynia, in Asia Minor, almost directly opposite Byzantium, south of Scutari (modern Üsküdar).
..... Click the link for more information.
Constantine I
Emperor of the Roman Empire

Head of Constantine's colossal statue at the Capitoline Museums
Reign 306 - 312 (hailed as Augustus in the West, officially made Caesar by Galerius with Severus as Augustus, by agreement with Maximian, refused
..... Click the link for more information.
Licinius
Augustus in the East

Coin featuring Licinius
Reign 11 November 308 - 311 (as Augustus in the west, with Galerius in the east);
311 - 313 (joint Augustus with Maximinus)
..... Click the link for more information.
Tetrarchy (Greek: "leadership of four people") can be applied to any system of government where power is divided between four individuals but is rarely used. The most famous Tetrarchy is that instituted by Roman Emperor Diocletian in 293 and lasted until c. 313.
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Bithynia was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine (today Black Sea).

Description


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Battle of the Hellespont was fought in 324 between a Constantinian fleet led by Flavius Julius Crispus and a larger fleet loyal to Licinius. Despite being outnumbered, Crispus won the day.
..... Click the link for more information.
Flavius Julius Crispus, also known as Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus was a Caesar of the Roman Empire. He was the first-born son of Constantine I and Minervina.

Life account

Birth

Crispus' year and place of birth are uncertain.
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Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. It derives from the cognomen of Julius Caesar, the Roman dictator.
..... Click the link for more information.
Constantine I
Emperor of the Roman Empire

Head of Constantine's colossal statue at the Capitoline Museums
Reign 306 - 312 (hailed as Augustus in the West, officially made Caesar by Galerius with Severus as Augustus, by agreement with Maximian, refused
..... Click the link for more information.
Licinius
Augustus in the East

Coin featuring Licinius
Reign 11 November 308 - 311 (as Augustus in the west, with Galerius in the east);
311 - 313 (joint Augustus with Maximinus)
..... Click the link for more information.
Üsküdar is a large and densely populated suburb of Istanbul, on the Anatolian shore of the Bosphorus right opposite the heart of the great city, next to Kadıköy. It is home to about half a million people.
..... Click the link for more information.
The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. This article however is about the latter.
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This article is about the city. See also Byzantine Empire.
Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named
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