Battle of Jargeau

Battle of Jargeau
Part of the Hundred Years' War

Statue of Joan of Arc at Place des Pyramides, Paris.
Date11-12 June, 1429
LocationJargeau, France
ResultFrench victory
Combatants
Kingdom of FranceKingdom of England
Commanders
Joan of Arc,
Duke John II of Alençon
William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk
Strength
1,200700
Casualties
?300-400


The Battle of Jargeau took place on June 11 - 12, 1429. It was Joan of Arc's first offensive battle. Shortly after relieving the siege at Orléans, French forces recaptured the neighboring district along the Loire river. This campaign was the first sustained French offensive in a generation in the Hundred Years' War.

Background

By the end of 1428, during the later years of the Hundred Years' War, the English and their Burgundian allies had occupied almost all of France north of the Loire River. Many strategic points along the Loire had also been seized, and Orléans, the last major city on the river, had been under siege since October of that year (1428). Were the English able to secure complete control of the Loire valley, the southern part of France, the last remaining position of the Dauphin would be open to invasion.

In early March of 1429, Joan of Arc arrived at Chinon to meet with the Dauphin and, after being examined by church officials in Poitiers, joined a large French force which set out to relieve the siege at Orléans. This operation proved successful as the siege was lifted by May 9.

The bridge at Orléans had been destroyed shortly before the siege lifted. The French had lost control of all other river crossings. Three swift and numerically small battles at Jargeau, Meung-sur-Loire, and Beaugency demonstrated renewed French confidence and laid the groundwork for subsequent French offenses on Rheims and Paris. The Loire campaign killed, captured, or disgraced a majority of the top tier of English commanders and decimated the numbers of the highly skilled English longbowmen.

The French Loire campaign of 1429 consisted of five actions:
1. The Siege of Orléans.
2. The Battle of Jargeau.
3. The Battle of Meung-sur-Loire.
4. The Battle of Beaugency.
5. The Battle of Patay.

From Orléans to Jargeau

Following the lifting of the siege of Orléans, the French forces spent the next month or so recruiting and growing in strength for the next phase of military operations. In early June, at a meeting of French military leaders in the presence of the Dauphin, it was decided to pursue a strategy of clearing the Loire River valley of English troops. The army was assembled at Orléans where Joan rejoined them on June 9. That same day the army departed for Jargeau, the first stop on the Loire Valley Campaign.

Meanwhile, on June 8, Sir John Fastolf finally left Paris with a reinforcing army of several thousand, headed for the Loire River valley.

Jargeau

Jargeau was a small town on the southern bank of the Loire river in central France, about ten miles east of Orléans. Conquered by the English a few years earlier as a staging point for a planned invasion of southern France, the city was defended by a wall with several towers and fortified gates. A ditch just on the outside of the walls further enhanced the defenses. Outside the walls, suburbs had grown. There was a single fortified bridge, of strategic significance during the latter part of the war, crossing the Loire River to the north bank. The city was defended by approximately 700 troops armed with gunpowder weaponry.

Tactics

Joan of Arc and Duke John II of Alençon controlled a force that included captains Jean d'Orléans, Gilles de Rais, Jean Poton de Xaintrailles, and La Hire. The duke of Suffolk William de la Pole led the English defense.

The battle began with a French assault on the suburbs. English defenders left the city walls and the French fell back. Joan of Arc used her standard to begin a French rally. The English retreated to the city walls and the French lodged in the suburbs for the night.

The following morning Joan of Arc called upon the defenders to surrender. They refused. The French followed with heavy artillery bombardment using primitive cannons and siege engines. One of the town's towers fell. Suffolk entered surrender nominations with a minor French captain, La Hire. This breach of protocol antagonized the French command.

Joan of Arc initiated an assault on the town walls, surviving a stone projectile that split in two against her helmet as she climbed a scaling ladder. The English suffered heavy losses. Most estimates place the number at 300-400 of some 700 combatants. Suffolk became a prisoner. The French had some 1200 troops and their losses appear to have been light.

Bibliography

  • DeVries, Kelly. Joan of Arc: A Military Leader (Glaucestershire: Sutton Publishing, 1999). ISBN 0-7509-1805-5
  • Richey, Stephen W. Joan of Arc: The Warrior Saint. (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2003). ISBN 0-275-98103-7
  • Allmand, C. The Hundred Years' War: England and France at War c. 1300 – 1450. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988). ISBN 0-521-31923-4

See also

External links

Hundred Years' War was a conflict between France and England, lasting 116 years from 1337 to 1453. It was fought primarily over claims by the English kings to the French throne and was punctuated by several brief and two lengthy periods of peace before it finally ended in the
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Joan of Arc, or Jeanne d'Arc in French,[1] (c. 1412 – May 30, 1431)[1] was a 15th century national heroine of France. She was tried and executed for heresy when she was only 19 years old.
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Ville de Paris

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Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur
(Latin: "Tossed by the waves, she does not sink")

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June 11 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

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June 12 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 1381 - Peasants' Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath.

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14th century - 15th century - 16th century
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Jargeau is a commune of the Loiret département, in France. Population: 4,065.

Postal code: 45150
INSEE code: 45173
Area: 1,466 ha.

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Motto
Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité
"Liberty, Equality, Fraternity"
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"La Marseillaise"


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Kingdom of England was a state located in western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain, consisting of the modern day constituent countries of England and Wales and the modern legal entity of England and Wales.
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Joan of Arc, or Jeanne d'Arc in French,[1] (c. 1412 – May 30, 1431)[1] was a 15th century national heroine of France. She was tried and executed for heresy when she was only 19 years old.
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John II of Alen̤on (March 2, 1409, Ch̢teau d'Argentan РSeptember 8, 1476, Paris) was the son of John I of Alen̤on and Marie of Brittany. He succeeded his father as Duke of Alen̤on and Count of Perche as a minor in 1415, after the latter's death at the Battle of Agincourt.
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..... Click the link for more information.
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Battle of Meung-sur-Loire took place on 15 June, 1429. It was one of Joan of Arc's battles following relief of the siege at Orléans. This campaign was the first sustained French offensive in a generation in the Hundred Years' War.
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Battle of Beaugency took place on 16 - 17 June, 1429. It was one of Joan of Arc's battles. Shortly after relieving the siege at Orléans, French forces recaptured the neighboring district along the Loire river.
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