Bukavac

Bukavac is a demonic mythical creature in Serbian mythology; belief about it existed in Srem[1]. Bukavac was sometimes imagined as a six-legged monster with gnarled horns[1]. He lives in lakes and big pools, coming out of the water during the night making big noise (hence the name: Serbian buka - noise), jumping onto people and animals and strangling them[1].

See also

References

1. ^ Š. Kulišic; P. Ž. Petrović, N. Pantelic [1970]. "Букава?", Српски митолошки речни? (in Serbian). Belgrade: Nolit, 48. 
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Serbian}}} 
Official status
Official language of:  Serbia

 Republic of Macedonia (in some municipalities)
Regulated by: Board for Standardization of the Serbian Language
Language codes
ISO 639-1: sr
ISO 639-2: scc (B)
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References

  • Wilhelm Vollmer (1974). Wörterbuch der Mythologie aller Völker (excerpt). Verlag-Stuttgart.

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References

  • Ingeman, B. S. Grundtræk til En Nord-Slavisk og Vendisk Gudelære. Copenhagen 1824.


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