Bunratty Castle

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Bunratty Castle


Bunratty Castle is a large tower house in County Clare, Ireland. It lies in the centre of Bunratty village (Irish: Bun Ráite), by the N18 road between Limerick and Ennis, near Shannon Town and its airport. The name Bunratty, Bun Raite (or possibly, Bun na Raite) in Irish, means the 'bottom' or end of the 'Ratty' river. This river, alongside the castle, flows into the nearby Shannon estuary. From the top of the castle, one can look over to the estuary and the airport.

The castle and the adjoining folk park are run by Shannon Development.

History

Key events in Bunratty's history include:
  • The first dwellings to occupy the site, in 970 were part of a Viking trading camp.
  • In 1270, Robert De Muscegros built the first defensive fortress, known as a motte and bailey castle.
  • These lands were later granted to Thomas de Clare, who built the first stone structure on the site. At this time Bunratty town had grown to a population of 1,000.
  • In 1318, Thomas's son Richard de Clare (new holder of the castle) was killed in the Battle of Dysert O'Dea during the Irish Bruce Wars 1315-1318. The castle and town were completely destroyed by the victorious O'Briens.
  • In 1332, soon after being restored for the King of England, the castle was once again razed by the Irish Chieftains of Thomond under the O' Briens and the MacNamaras.
  • In 1353, after lying in ruins for 21 years, it was rebuilt by Sir Thomas Rokeby, but was almost immediately attacked again by the Irish and was held by Irish hands thereafter.
  • The present structure was completed by the MacNamara family around 1425 but 50 years later was in the hands of the O'Briens, the most powerful clan in Munster.
  • In 1646, during the Irish Confederate Wars, Barnaby O'Brien, the Earl of Thomond, allowed a large English Parliamentary garrison to land in Bunratty. The castle was besieged and taken by the forces of Confederate Ireland under Donagh MacCarthy, Viscount Muskerry.

Bunratty today

Bunratty Castle is now a very popular tourist attraction, due in a large part to the proximity of the airport. The interior has been furnished with tapestries and artifacts from various eras in the castle's history (none or few are belonging to the castle). Some of the sights include the 'great hall', dungeons and four towers with spiral stairwells. Medieval-style banquets are held twice every evening in the great hall. The castle is also a popular attraction for wedding parties from the closest main city of Limerick hoping to make their special day even better with the beautiful surroundings.

Folk Park

Alongside the castle is an extensive folk park, particularly popular with families, tourists and schools. This features reconstructions of historical cottages and buildings, recreating the general feel of the 19th century with a period style village main street. Old tools, furniture and artefacts are displayed, with the village kept alive by some inhabited shops, an old home bakery and peat fires in cottages.

External links

geographic coordinate system enables every location on the earth to be specified by the three coordinates of a spherical coordinate system aligned with the spin axis of the Earth.
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tower house is a particular type of stone structure, built for defensive purposes as well as habitation.[1] Such buildings were constructed in the wilder parts of Great Britain, particularly in Scotland and throughout Ireland, beginning in the High Middle Ages and
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County Clare (Contae an Chláir in Irish) is in the Irish province of Munster. It is located on the west coast of Ireland, northwest of the River Shannon and bordering Lough Derg. Area: 3,147 km² (1,215 square miles). Its capital is the town of Ennis.
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Anthem
Amhrán na bhFiann  
The Soldier's Song


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Bunratty (Irish: Bun na Raite, meaning End of the Raite river) is a village near Limerick city in County Clare, Ireland.

History

The first settlement in Bunratty was by Vikings in 970AD.
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Irish}}} 
Writing system: Latin (Irish variant) 
Official status
Official language of: Republic of Ireland
Northern Ireland
European Union
Regulated by: Foras na Gaeilge
Language codes
ISO 639-1: ga
ISO 639-2: gle
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The N18 road is a National Primary Route in Ireland, connecting the cities of Limerick and Galway. Ennis and Gort are two major towns on the route, and Shannon Airport is reached via the connecting N19 road. The west coast route continues on to Sligo as the N17.
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For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation).
Limerick (Irish: Luimneach: Lom na nEach - the bare place - i.e. open ground - of the horses
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Ennis (Irish: Inis, meaning Island) is the county town of Clare in Ireland. Situated on the River Fergus, it lies north of Limerick and south of Galway on the main N18 road connecting these two cities.
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Shannon or Shannon Town (Irish: An tSionna, meaning The Old one) is a new town located in County Clare and is one of only two planned towns on the island of Ireland, the other being the Northern Ireland town of
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Shannon Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is an airport in Ireland. Approx 3.7 million passengers travelled through Shannon in 2006, making it the second busiest in Ireland by passenger movements.
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river is a natural waterway that transits water through a landscape from higher to lower elevations. It is an integral component of the water cycle. The water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through surface runoff, groundwater recharge (as seen at baseflow
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River Shannon (Irish: Sionainn altenatively Sionna), the longest river in the islands of Ireland and Great Britain at 386 km (240 mi), divides the west of Ireland (mostly the province of Connacht) from the east and south
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estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries are often associated with high rates of biological productivity. An estuary is where the river meets the sea.
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This article or section needs sources or references that appear in reliable, third-party publications. Alone, primary sources and sources affiliated with the subject of this article are not sufficient for an accurate encyclopedia article.
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Viking, also called Norseman or Northman, refers to a member of the Scandinavian seafaring traders, warriors and pirates who raided and colonized wide areas of Europe from the 8th to the 11th century[1]
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motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. Many were built in Britain, Ireland and France in the 11th and 12th centuries.

Construction

The motte in French is a raised earth mound, like a small hill, usually artificial and topped with a wooden or stone structure
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There have been several people named Richard de Clare, most of them descended from Richard Fitz Gilbert, Earl of Clare, Lord of Bienfaite, Orbec and Tonbridge, (1035-1090), who took the title Earl of Clare from lands granted to him by William the Conqueror.
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The Battle of Dysert O'Dea took place at Dysert O'Dea near Corofin, Co. Clare, Ireland, on May 10, 1318 during the Irish Bruce Wars 1315-1318. The Norman Richard de Clare attacked the Irish chieftain Conor O'Dea, but his forces were ultimately defeated.
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Historical background

By the early 14th century, Ireland had not had a High King since Ruaidri mac Tairrdelbach Ua Conchobair who had been deposed by his son in 1186. The country was divided between Irish dynasties and Anglo-Irish lords who ruled parts of Ireland.
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monarchs of England. Traditionally, the first monarch of England is listed as Egbert, Bretwalda from 829, though the kingdom was not permanently unified until 927, under Athelstan. Union with Wales was enacted in 1536, and with Scotland in 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.
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Thomond (Irish: Tuadh Mumhan, meaning North Munster) The region of Ireland associated with the name Thomond is County Limerick, north County Tipperary and east County Clare, effectively most of north Munster.
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Munster (Irish: An Mhumhain, IPA: [ənˈvuːnʲ], Cúige Mumhan or Mumha) is the southernmost of the four provinces of Ireland.
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The Irish Confederate Wars, also sometimes called the Eleven Years War, were fought in Ireland between 1641 and 1653. The Wars were the Irish theatre of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms - a series of civil wars in Kingdoms of Ireland, England and Scotland (all ruled by Charles
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Confederate Ireland refers to the period of Irish self-government between the Rebellion of 1641 and the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland in 1649. During this time, two-thirds of Ireland was governed by the Irish Catholic Confederation, also known as the "
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Donagh [Donough] MacCarthy, Viscount Muskerry and Earl of Clancarty (d. August 1665) was an Irish noble (as well as the brother-in-law of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde) and served as a Munster general during the Irish Confederate Wars.
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A tourist attraction is a place of interest where tourists visit. Some examples include historical places, monuments, zoos, museums and art galleries, botanical gardens, buildings and structures (e.g.
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Tapestry is a form of textile art. It is woven by hand on a vertical loom. It is weft-faced weaving, in which all the warp threads are hidden in the completed work, unlike cloth weaving where both the warp and the weft threads may be visible.
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dungeon is a place where prisoners are kept. In the past, it used to double as the keep.

Etymology

The word dungeon was derived from the Old French donjon, which came from the Latin dominus, "lord".
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tower blocks. In the United States, the now-destroyed World Trade Center had the nickname the Twin Towers, a name shared with the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur.
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