Claudius (gens)

The gens Claudia was one of the oldest families in ancient Rome, and for centuries its members were regularly leaders of the city and empire.

The family was traditionally held to have begun with Attius Clausus, a Sabine who favored peace with Rome, an unpopular position that led to him leaving Regillus with his followers around 504 BC. Rome was welcoming however, making his followers citizens and giving them land, and making Appius Claudius Sabinus Inregillensis, as he was called in Latin, a senator. It is assumed that the name came from the Latin claudeo (to limp), as many of the family members were lame, probably from some congenital disorder.

Branches of the gens Claudia

There were several major branches of the Claudian gens at the end of the Republic.
  • One obscure patrician branch of the family appears to have had no cognomen. A Lucius Claudius served as Rex Sacrorum in the mid-1st Century BC. He is doubly unusual, since "Lucius" is rare in any of the branches of the Claudii and unusual among patricians in general.
  • Those with the cognomen Nero were prominent patrician senators during the late Republic; they favoured the praenomen Tiberius. However, the Neros joined the gens Julia when Tiberius Claudius Nero, the son of another Ti. Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla (herself a member of the other main branch of the gens Claudia - the Claudii Pulchri) through her father Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus) was adopted by Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus thus forming the Julio-Claudian dynasty.
  • Those Claudii with the cognomen Marcellus (fem.Marcella, meaning martial) were plebeians and had three consuls in three successive years (51-49 BC; two brothers and their first cousin); they favoured the praenomina Gaius and Marcus. Gaius Claudius Marcellus (consul 49 BC) was married to Augustus' sister Octavia Minor and their son, Marcus, was married to Augustus' daughter, Julia the Elder.
  • Those Claudii with the cognomen Pulcher (fem. Pulchra, meaning "beautiful") were patricians and also very prominent in the late republic; they favoured the praenomina Appius (the only family to bear this praenomen) and Publius. A plebeian offshoot of this family was created when a Publius Claudius Pulcher had himself adopted by a plebeian (for political reasons) and was thereafter known as Publius Clodius; his sister Clodia also adopted this vulgar spelling.
  • As noted, some plebian Claudians used the gentilicium "Clodius."
  • Claudia (and Clodia) were the forms used by women.

Notable members of the gens Claudia

Note: Consuls of 51 and 49 BC were brothers and first cousins to the consul of 50 BC. Note: Claudians after the death of Nero were most likely descended from freedmen of the Claudians, or men granted citizenship by Claudians.

See also

gens (pl. gentes) was a clan, caste, or group of families, that shared a common name (the nomen) and a belief in a common ancestor. In the Roman naming convention, the second name was the name of the gens to which the person belonged.
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Comune di Roma

Flag
Seal
Nickname: "The Eternal City"
Motto: "Senatus Populusque Romanus" (SPQR)   (Latin)
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Sabines (Latin Sabini - singular Sabinus) were an Italic tribe that lived in ancient Italy. Their language belonged to the Sabellic subgroup of Italic languages and shows some similarities to Oscan and Umbrian.
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Regillus was an ancient lake of Latium, Italy, famous in the legendary history of Rome as the lake in the neighborhood of which occurred (496 B.C.) the battle which finally decided the hegemony of Rome in Latium.
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5th century BC - 4th century BC

530s BC 520s BC 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC
509 BC 508 BC 507 BC 506 BC 505 BC
504 BC 503 BC 502 BC 501 BC 500 BC

- - State leaders - Sovereign states
-

Events and trends


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Appius Claudius Sabinus Inregillensis (c. 500 BC) was the semi-legendary founder of the Claudii. He was born Attius Clausus in the Sabine territories. It was said that he favored peace with the Roman Republic, an unpopular position, and left with a group of followers.
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Latin}}} 
Official status
Official language of: Vatican City
Used for official purposes, but not spoken in everyday speech
Regulated by: Opus Fundatum Latinitas
Roman Catholic Church
Language codes
ISO 639-1: la
ISO 639-2: lat
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The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. Although the West Roman Empire ended in the 5th century (in 476), the Roman Senate continued to meet until the latter part of the 6th
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A congenital disorder is any medical condition that is present at birth. However, a congenital disorder can be recognized before birth (prenatally), at birth, years later, or never. The term congenital does not imply or exclude a genetic cause.
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The cognomen ("name known by" in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. The term is also occasionally seen in modern times as a synonym for nickname or epithet.
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The Rex Sacrorum (Latin: "king of sacred things") was a religious office under the Roman Republic. It is analogous to the office of sacred king in other cultures.

Establishment


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The cognomen ("name known by" in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. The term is also occasionally seen in modern times as a synonym for nickname or epithet.
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In the naming convention of ancient Rome the archetypical name of a male citizen consisted of three parts (tria nomina): praenomen (given name), nomen gentile or gentilicium (name of the gens or clan) and cognomen
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For other meanings of Julius see Julius (disambiguation)


Julius (fem. Julia) is the nomen of the gens Julia, an important patrician family of ancient Rome supposed to have descended from Julus, and thus from the goddess Venus.
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Tiberius
Emperor of the Roman Empire

A bust of the Emperor Tiberius
Reign AD 14–AD 37
Full name Tiberius Caesar Augustus
(born Tiberius Claudius Nero)
Born November 16, 42 BC
Rome
Died
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Tiberius Claudius Nero (ca. 85 - 33 BC) was a member of the Claudian Family of ancient Rome. He was a descendant of the original Tiberius Claudius Nero a consul, son of Appius Claudius Caecus the censor.
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Livia Drusilla, after 14 AD called Livia Augusta (Classical Latin: LIVIA•DRVSILLA , later LIVIA•AVGVSTA [1]) (58 BC-AD 29) was the wife of Caesar Augustus (also known as Octavian) and the most powerful woman in the early Roman Empire, acting several
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Marcus Livius Drusus Nero (died 42 BC) was the father of Roman Empress Livia Drusilla.

Life

Marcus was born as Tiberius Claudius Nero and was the son of an impoverished patrician of the same name.
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Augustus Caesar
Emperor of the Roman Empire

Reign January 16 27 BC – August 19 AD 14
Full name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus
Born September 23, 63 BC
Rome, Roman Republic
Died August 19, AD 14 (age 76)
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The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. They ruled the Roman Empire from 27 BC to AD 68, when the last of the line, Nero, committed suicide.
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Marcellus (martial)[1] may refer to:

In geography:
  • Marcellus, Michigan
  • Marcellus (town), New York
  • Marcellus (village), New York
In politics:
  • Gaius Claudius Marcellus Minor, Roman consul in 50 BC

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In Ancient Rome, the plebs were the general body of Roman citizens, distinct from the privileged class of the patricians. A member of the plebs was known as a plebeian (Latin: plebeius).
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Gaius Claudius Marcellus Maior was a Roman consul in 49 BC.

He is frequently confused with his cousin of the same name, Gaius Claudius Marcellus Minor, a consul a year before in 50 BC. Gaius was also the brother of the Marcus Claudius Marcellus, the consul of 51 BC.
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For other Roman noble women of this name see Octavia
Octavia Thurina Minor (69 - 11 BC), also known as Octavia the Younger or simply Octavia
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Marcus Claudius Marcellus (42-23 BC) was the eldest son of Octavia Minor, sister of Augustus, and Gaius Claudius Marcellus Minor, a former consul. He was descended through his father from Marcus Claudius Marcellus, a famous general in the Second Punic War.
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clear distinction between fact and .
Please [ edit this article], according to the fiction guidelines, to meet Wikipedia's . (talk, )


Julia the Elder (October 39 BC - 14), known to her contemporaries as Julia Caesaris filia or
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Publius Clodius Pulcher (born around 92 BC, died January 18, 52 BC), was a Roman politician, chiefly remembered for his feuds with Titus Annius Milo and Marcus Tullius Cicero and introducing the grain dole.
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Publius Clodius Pulcher (born around 92 BC, died January 18, 52 BC), was a Roman politician, chiefly remembered for his feuds with Titus Annius Milo and Marcus Tullius Cicero and introducing the grain dole.
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Clodia, (born Claudia Pulchra Tercia ca. 95 BC and often referred to in scholarship as Clodia Metelli ("Clodia the wife of Metellus")), was the third daughter of the patrician Appius Claudius Pulcher and Caecilia Metella Balearica.
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Vulgarism" derives from Latin vulgus, the "common folk", and has carried into English its original connotations linking it with the low and coarse motivations that were supposed to be natural to the commons, who were not moved by higher motives like fame for
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