Exeter College, Oxford

Colleges and halls of the University of Oxford
Exeter College
                     
College nameExeter College
Latin nameCollegium Exoniense
Named afterWalter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter
Established1314
Sister collegeEmmanuel College, Cambridge
RectorMs Frances Cairncross
JCR presidentSimon Heawood
Undergraduates299
MCR presidentMeredith Riedel
Graduates150

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Exeter College, Oxford (Oxford (central))


Location of Exeter College within central OxfordCoordinates:
Homepage
Boatclub


Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The main entrance is on the east side of Turl Street. As of 2006, the college had an estimated financial endowment of £47m. [1]

History

Still situated in its original location on Turl Street, Exeter College was founded in 1314 by Walter de Stapeldon of Devon, Bishop of Exeter and later treasurer to Edward II, who intended it as a school to educate clergy. During its first century, it was known as Stapeldon Hall and was significantly smaller, with just twelve to fourteen students. The college grew significantly from the 15th century onward, and began offering rooms to its students. The College motto is "Floreat Exon", meaning "Let Exeter Flourish".

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The stained glass of the Exeter College Chapel
In the 16th century, donations from Sir William Petre, a former Exeter graduate, helped to expand and transform the college. As a result, Exeter College became one of the leading colleges in the University. The present Hall was built in the year 1618 with the rest of the college completed by 1710, with the exception of the old gatehouse, Palmer's Tower, which dates from 1432. In the 18th century the college experienced declining popularity, as did all of Oxford's other colleges. University reforms in the 1850s helped to end this period of stagnation.

The college saw much building work during the 1850s to the designs of Sir George Gilbert Scott, including the chapel (1854-60, inspired by the Sainte Chapelle in Paris), the library 1856, also in a 13th century style, the rector's lodgings from 1857 in Georgian style, and the Broad Street range from 1856.<ref > Nikolaus Pevsner and Jennifer Sherwood: The Buildings of England: Oxfordshire, 1974 pp. 136-7.

The college expanded again in the 20th century when it acquired new buildings, thereby enabling it to accommodate more undergraduate students. Until 1978 the college did not allow women students, but in 1993 Exeter College became the first of the former all-male colleges to elect a woman, Marilyn Butler, as its Rector. When Butler's tenure expired in October 2004, the college elected another woman – Frances Cairncross, former Senior Editor of The Economist – as Rector.

Student Life

As one of the smaller Oxford Colleges, Exeter has a reputation for having a close-knit student body, and Common Rooms that are noted for their friendliness and openness to new students. First year undergraduates are housed on-site in the College’s Turl St. site, and there is dedicated Graduate accommodation for the college on Iffley Road.

As the University’s fourth oldest college, a certain emphasis is placed on tradition, especially during special occasions such as the annual ‘Burns’ Night,’ a dinner in honour of the great Scottish poet Robert Burns, where a traditional meal of haggis is always served. The College’s ties with Williams College in the United States, as well as the generally international composition of the MCR makes the annual Thanksgiving dinner a popular occasion as well. The MCR hosts a large number of married students, and non-studying spouses are encouraged to actively participate in the life of college.

The MCR hosts a large number of specialists in Law and Byzantine studies, and the JCR has a high concentration of students reading the popular Modern History and PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics) degrees. However, like most other Oxford colleges no single discipline can be said to dominate either common room, and the atmosphere is one of a great deal of interdisciplinary mingling.

Like all Oxford Colleges Exeter prides itself on its athletic achievements as well as its academic: in 2005/2006 Exeter students competed at a University level on the varsity Lacrosse, football, Golf, Fencing, Rugby, Powerlifting, Gymnastics, Darts, Ice Hockey and Wine Tasting teams. It also fields several teams on an intra-university college level, particularly in rowing.

The college also places an emphasis on preparing students for their future careers once they leave the university. Unusually for an Oxford college, Exeter boasts a dedicated Careers Office and internship programme, with links to a wide range of companies around the globe. The college’s Development Office works not only to help fund the college but also to provide networking opportunities for students through its alumni contacts, and through its annual ‘City Drinks.?

Notable former students

See also

Prominent academics/tutors

See also

In fiction

Exeter College is the real life basis for the fictional Jordan College, Oxford in Philip Pullman's trilogy His Dark Materials.

In the 1997 novel Great Apes by Will Self, an old Exonian, the author imagines an Earth where chimpanzees have evolved as the dominant, sentient species. One scene is set in Exeter College Hall, where the chimpanzee dons rampage around the High Table, showing in their conversation the very high intelligence to be expected of Oxford academics, but all the while exhibiting in their behaviour the manners and habits of chimpanzees.

In the final Morse episode, "The Remorseful Day", Inspector Morse collapses from a heart attack in the front quadrangle as Fauré's In Paradisum is being sung in chapel.[2]

The 2007 film used the college for the location of the fictional Jordan College.[3] The film is based on alumnus Philip Pullman's first novel of his His Dark Materials trilogy, Northern Lights.

Williams College

There has been a close relationship with Williams College in the United States for many years, the Williams-Exeter Programme. Twenty six to thirty undergraduates from Williams spend their junior year at Exeter with full undergraduate privileges, but live together with a Williams faculty proctor in special housing in North Oxford. Courses taken at Exeter College count for full credit at Williams.

References

1. ^ Oxford College Endowment Incomes, 1973-2006 (updated July 2007)
2. ^ Leonard, Bill, The Oxford of Inspector Morse Location Guides, Oxford (2004) pp. 77 and 79. ISBN 0-9547671-1-X.
3. ^ Filming locations for His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass. IMDb locations page. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.

External links

The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university.
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A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution within the University — not as a constituent College, but able to present students for Oxford University degrees.
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University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. for post-nominals, from "Oxoniensis"), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world.
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Walter de Stapeldon (February 1, 1261 – October 15, 1326), English bishop, was born at Annery in North Devon.

He became professor of canon law at Oxford University and chaplain to Pope Clement V and on March 13, 1307 was chosen Bishop of Exeter, and was
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1314 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1314
MCCCXIV
Ab urbe condita 2067
Armenian calendar 763
ԹՎ ՉԿԳ
Bah' calendar -530 – -529
Buddhist calendar 1858
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sister colleges across the two universities. Oriel College, Oxford and St John's College, Cambridge also have links with Trinity College, Dublin. The extent of the arrangement differs from case to case, but commonly includes the right to invitations to May balls, the right to dine
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Emmanuel College

                     
College name Emmanuel College
Named after Jesus of Nazareth (Emmanuel)
Established 1584
Location St Andrew's Street
Admittance
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Frances Anne Cairncross CBE (born 30 August 1944, Otley, England) is a British economist, journalist and academic.

She is the daughter of economist Sir Alexander Kirkland Cairncross (Alec Cairncross) and the niece of John Cairncross.
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Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). It is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.
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geographic coordinate system enables every location on the earth to be specified by the three coordinates of a spherical coordinate system aligned with the spin axis of the Earth.
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The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university.
..... Click the link for more information.
University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. for post-nominals, from "Oxoniensis"), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world.
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Motto
Dieu et mon droit   (French)
"God and my right"
Anthem
No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is "God Save the Queen".
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Turl Street is a street in Oxford, England. It is located in the city centre, linking Broad Street at the north and High Street at the south. It is colloquially known as The Turl and runs past three of Oxford's colleges: Exeter, Jesus and Lincoln.
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A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the remain intact. This allows for the donation to have a much greater impact over a long period of time than if it were spent all at once.
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1314 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1314
MCCCXIV
Ab urbe condita 2067
Armenian calendar 763
ԹՎ ՉԿԳ
Bah' calendar -530 – -529
Buddhist calendar 1858
..... Click the link for more information.
Walter de Stapeldon (February 1, 1261 – October 15, 1326), English bishop, was born at Annery in North Devon.

He became professor of canon law at Oxford University and chaplain to Pope Clement V and on March 13, 1307 was chosen Bishop of Exeter, and was
..... Click the link for more information.
Devon

Motto: Auxilio divino (Latin: By divine aid)

Geography
Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
Region South West England
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
- Admin.
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Exeter

Arms of Exeter City Council
Exeter ()
|240px|Exeter (

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Edward II
By the Grace of God, King of England
Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine


Reign 7 July1307 - 20 January 1327
Coronation 25 February 1308
Born 25 March 1284(1284--)
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15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500.

Events

  • 1402: Ottoman and Timurid Empires fight at the Battle of Ankara resulting in Timur's capture of Bayezid I.
  • 1402: The conquest of the Canary Islands signals the beginning of the Spanish Empire.

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As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 through 1600.

See also: 16th century in literature

Events

1500s

  • 1500s: Mississippian culture disappears.

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William Petre was born in 1505 and educated at Exeter College, Oxford. He became a public servant, probably through the influence of the Boleyns, one of whom, George, he had tutored at Oxford and another of whom, Anne, was married to the king.
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8th century - 9th century - 10th century
850s  860s  870s  - 880s -  890s  900s  910s
885 886 887 - 888 - 889 890 891

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Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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8th century - 9th century - 10th century
850s  860s  870s  - 880s -  890s  900s  910s
885 886 887 - 888 - 889 890 891

:
Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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The 18th Century lasted from 1701 through 1800 in the Gregorian calendar.

Historians sometimes specifically define the 18th Century otherwise for the purposes of their work.
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Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century

1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s
1850 1851 1852 1853 1854
1855 1856 1857 1858 1859

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Events and Trends

Technology


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Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century

1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s
1850 1851 1852 1853 1854
1855 1856 1857 1858 1859

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-

Events and Trends

Technology


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George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses.
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19th century - 20th century
1820s  1830s  1840s  - 1850s -  1860s  1870s  1880s
1851 1852 1853 - 1854 - 1855 1856 1857

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Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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