Filipino orthography

The Filipino alphabet (officially Makabagong alpabetong Filipino; English: Modern Filipino alphabet) is made up of 28 letters, which includes the entire 21-letter set of the Abakada (including ng) and 8 letters from the Spanish alphabet (namely C, F, J, Ñ, Q, V, X and Z). It was once formerly known as the abakada when it was created by Lope K. Santos during the American colonial period. It is used today as the writing system for all autochthonous Austronesian languages in the Philippines and occasionally in writing Chabacano, a Spanish-derived creole.

Adoption of the Roman alphabet

When the Philippine languages were first written in the Roman alphabet, they used Spanish orthography. This alphabet was called the abecedario. Relics of this can still be seen in the way "Castilianized" indigenous and Chinese-origin surnames are written, such as Macasáquit, Guanzón, Dimaculañgan, and others. Many indigenous place names are also written using Spanish orthography, often either coexisting or competing with their native forms if they exist (Bulacán/Bulakan, Caloocan/Kalookan, Taguig/Tagig, etc.). Parañaque would be written in the native system as Paranyake, but the latter spelling is so far unaccepted if at all heard of.

Abakada was the Tagalog alphabet, Tagalog having been selected as the national language in 1935, of 20 letters officially introduced by Lope K. Santos through his Balarila ng Wikang Pambansa (but initially employed by José Rizal who suggested replacing the use of both C and Q by simply K) during the American occupation of the country and adopted by the National Language Institute of the Philippines in 1973. The alphabet was called "abakada" for the letters were pronounced with the sound "a" at the end, for example b was pronounced "ba", l was pronounced "la", and so on. This alphabet of 20 letters has only one letter to represent each distinct sound in Tagalog—unlike, say, the letters 'c' and 'k' in English. The 20 letters of Abakada are written as a b k d e g h i l m n ng (where ng is considered as only one letter.) o p r s t u w y.

The National Language Institute initiated the new language in 1973. In 1976, the alphabet consisted of 31 letters—the 26 letters of the English alphabet, the Spanish ñ, ll, rr, and ch, and the ng of Tagalog. In practice, however, the digraphs are considered as their two constituent letters. In 1973 Pilipino was defined by law as the official language. The national alphabet was again expanded in 1976 to include the letters C, Ch, F, J, Ll, Ñ, Q, Rr, V, X, and Z in order to accommodate words of Spanish and English origin. The alphabet was then later reduced to 28 letters, rr, ll and ch, all of which are of Spanish origin, were removed, leaving 28 letters, in 1987 when Pilipino was renamed Filipino. (Ch, Rr, and Ll were themselves later abolished from the Spanish alphabet.) This current alphabet is basically the entire English alphabet plus the letters Ñ and Ng, alphabetized separately in theory.

Samples of the Different Ortograpy Styles

SPANISH SYSTEM (from the Doctrina Cristiana)
Ama namin, nasa Lañgitca,
Ypasamba Mo añg Ñgalanmo.
Mouisaamin ang pagcaharimo.
Ypasonor mo ang loob mo
Dito sa lupa para sa Lañgit.
Bigya mo cami ñgaion ng amin cacanin para nañg sa arao-arao.
At pacaualin Mo ang amin casalanã,
Yaiang uinaualan bahala namĩ sa loob
Ang casalanan nang nagcacasala sa amin.
Houag mo caming æwan nang dicami matalo ng tocso,
Datapouat yadia mo cami sa dilan masama.
Sapagcat iyo an caharian at capaniarihan
At caloualhatian, magpacailan man.
Amen.


MODERN TAGALOG SYSTEM (Modern Translation)
Ama namin, sumasalangit ka,
Sambahin ang Ngalan mo.
Mapasaamin ang kaharian mo.
Sundin ang loob mo
Dito sa lupa, para nang sa langit.
Bigyan mo kami ngayon ng aming kakanin sa araw araw.
At patawarin mo kami sa aming mga sala,
Para nang pagpapatawad namin
Sa mga nagkakasala sa amin.
At huwag Mo kaming ipahintulot sa tukso,
At iadya Mo kami sa lahat ng masama.
Sapagkat Iyo ang kaharian, at kapangyarihan,
At ang kadakilaan, magpakailanman.
Amen

See also

English}}} 
Writing system: Latin (English variant) 
Official status
Official language of: 53 countries
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: en
ISO 639-2: eng
ISO 639-3: eng  
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The Filipino alphabet (officially Makabagong alpabetong Filipino; English: Modern Filipino alphabet) is made up of 28 letters, which includes the entire 21-letter set of the Abakada (including ng
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Ng (lowercase: ng) is a digraph of the Latin alphabet. In English and English-derived orthographies, it generally represents the velar nasal, IPA ŋ.
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Spanish orthography is one of the most phonemic among those that are written with the Latin alphabet. For detailed information on the pronunciation not found here, see also Spanish phonology.
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Ñ (lower case ñ) is a letter of the modern Roman alphabet formed by an N with a diacritical tilde. It is most notably used in the Spanish alphabet and Filipino Alphabet, where it represents a palatal nasal (IPA:
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Motto
"In God We Trust"   (since 1956)
"E Pluribus Unum"   ("From Many, One"; Latin, traditional)
Anthem
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Austronesian languages are a language family widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia. It is on par with Indo-European, Afro-Asiatic and Uralic as one of the best-established ancient language families.
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Chavacano (as a proper noun, as a derivative of the Spanish adjective "chabacano," and as it is generally accepted in literature, the broadcast media, and Zamboangueños) or Chabacano
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Chavacano (also Chabacano) is the name of several Spanish-based Creoles spoken in the Philippines. The name of the language stems from the Spanish word Chabacano which means "common", "ordinary".
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Latin alphabet
Child systems Numerous: see Alphabets derived from the Latin
Sister systems Cyrillic
Coptic
Armenian
Runic/Futhark
Unicode range See Latin characters in Unicode
ISO 15924 Latn

Note
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Spanish orthography is one of the most phonemic among those that are written with the Latin alphabet. For detailed information on the pronunciation not found here, see also Spanish phonology.
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Tagalog}}} 
Writing system: Latin (Filipino variant);
Historically written in Baybayin 
Official status
Official language of: Philippines (in the form of Filipino)
Regulated by: Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (Commission on the Filipino language)
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ABCs redirects here, for the Alien Big Cats, see British big cats.


An alphabet is a standardized set of letters
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1900s  1910s  1920s  - 1930s -  1940s  1950s  1960s
1932 1933 1934 - 1935 - 1936 1937 1938

Year 1935 (MCMXXXV
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Jos̩ Rizal (full name: Jos̩ Protacio Mercado Rizal Alonso y Realonda) (June 19, 1861 РDecember 30, 1896), was a Filipino polymath, nationalist and the most prominent advocate for reforms in the Philippines during the Spanish colonial era.
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The Commission on the Filipino Language (Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino in Filipino, Comision na Salitan Filipino in Pangasinan) is the official regulating body of the Filipino language and the official government institution tasked with developing, preserving, and
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 Spanish in the Philippines
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Language codes
ISO 639-1: none
ISO 639-2:
ISO 639-3: —

Spanish was the first official language of the Philippines since the conquest by Spain in the 16th century.
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1970 1971 1972 - 1973 - 1974 1975 1976
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1973 1974 1975 - 1976 - 1977 1978 1979

Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI
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Philippine English is the variety of English used in the Republic of the Philippines by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino, the standardized dialect of
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This article is about the phonology of the Tagalog language. It deals with current phonology and phonetics as well as with historical developments thereof, including variants (for details, see the articles on Filipino language, Filipino orthography, and Tagalog language).
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