Freeform hardcore

Freeform
Stylistic origins: Trancecore, 4-beat, Bouncy techno
Cultural origins: 1999, United Kingdom
2003, Finland
Typical instruments: SynthesizerDrum machineSequencerKeyboardSampler
Mainstream popularity: Small
Subgenres
none
Fusion genres
none
Other topics
Electronic musical instrumentComputer music


Freeform Hardcore is a form of Hard Dance introduced in 1999 that is an offshoot of a subgenre Happy Hardcore. The name "Freeform" was given by DJ Sharkey of the Nu Energy Collective, who along with several other DJs, most notably Kevin Energy, forged the new genre. The sound is quite experimental and has plenty of freedom in structure as you see in other 'free' musical genres such as freeform jazz, broken beat or wonky techno.

The first official freeform track was Ultraworld 5 By DJ Eclipse, which featured on the second installment of the widely popular Bonkers compilation series. Freeform began as a closely related offshoot of Happy Hardcore, borrowing much of its structure and sound. A satisfactory, if somewhat inaccurate, way of describing this early Freeform is as fast tempo Hardcore with added elements of Hard Trance. Given the nature of the genre, it was not long before it developed into its own highly unique and distinct musical style with a strong following. The DJs that produced Freeform continued to experiment, forever searching for that new sound, and a myriad of differing sounds and almost sub-genres of Freeform itself began to develop. Currently it is split into three primary streams, UK Freeform, NuNRG and FiNRG (or Finnish Freeform).

UK Freeform, having evolved directly from Hardcore, still relates closely to it (4-beat, bouncy techno) and quite often is more melodic. Lyrics are more common place in UK Freeform, but are certainly far less pervasive than they are in Hardcore. Earlier UK Freeform, particularly, was devoid of lyrics, especially those produced by DJs such as Kevin Energy and K-Complex, who had come to produce Freeform from Hard Trance and Hard House backgrounds, rather than Hardcore. Recently, however, UK Freeform has seen a resurgance in vocalists, with Sharkey teaming up with Suzi Ankhah to produce songs such as Dual Illumination, and Arkitech with his vocalist Amy who appears in many songs. The preferred vocals, to date, have been more akin to traditional Trance anthems, but very recent Freeform featured on the sixteenth release in the Bonkers series and the third release in the Hardcore Heaven series have featured vocalists employing Happy Hardcore style lyrics, even by such producers as Kevin Energy. This newer, cheesier, bouncier style of UK Freeform is being spearheaded by two labels primarily; Future Dance and Thin 'N' Crispy. The former is the brainchild of DJs Ethos and Stormtrooper, the latter DJ Robbie Long, who also plays heavily with Stormtrooper. This style of Freeform is rather popular amongst Hardcore producers, and quite often a few scattered songs will appear on otherwise Hardcore compilations. Even well renowned Hardcore producer Scott Brown has dabbled with this style.

FiNRG is much more closely related to Psy Trance and Acid Trance. It developed later than UK Freeform, its formation officially marked in 2002 with the collaboration of DJs Karri K, Nemes and Carbon Based, traditionally playing Psy Trance and Acid Trance. Later they were joined by Alek Száhala and DJ RX in 2003, who added their own flavour to the style, which was comparatively harder than the earlier productions. FiNRG is typically broader in scope than UK Freeform, from dark and evil, to psychedelic and energised, to uplifting anthems akin to up tempo Hard Trance. There are a great deal of similarities between UK Freeform and FiNRG, as one would expect since the former is where the Finnish DJs drew their inspiration. Many of the synths employed by UK and Finnish producers alike are similar, if not identical, but it is the way in which they are utilised which really draws the lines of distinction between the two styles. While UK Freeform producers typically use Acidic and Psychedelic synths to highlight and enchance frantic, hard driving sections of songs, Finnish producers are more inclined to base the entirety of the song on them, and to focus instead on the complexity and depth of the music. That being said, both of the two styles are, virtually, open in style, as the name Freeform suggests, and there are countless exceptions.

NuNRG is the most recent style that is slowly emerging. As with all things Freeform, it is an highly amorphous style and somewhat difficult to define. This is particularly so because of all the Freeform styles it is the most experimental and almost entirely without boundaries. It is both a combination of UK Freeform and FiNRG, as well as employing a wide variety of musical tidbits from a plethora of genres, including, but not restricted to, Hardcore, Hard Trance, Acid Trance, Psy Trance, Hard House, Hard NRG, Drum 'n' Bass and Breakbeat. Headline Freeform DJs from both countries, including Sharkey, K-Complex, Kevin Energy, Alek Szahala, Carbon Based, RX and many more have been producing songs in this style, but the pioneers of the style are A.M.S, CLSM, with his self titled record label, Asa & S1 and DJ Impact. Anything from upbeat, Happy Hardcore style tracks, to melodic Hard Trance style anthems, to dark, dirty, acidic songs, and even to A.M.S and CLSM's unique down tempo, chill out style are possible.

A relatively new electronic music style, Freeform is emerging as a popular genre in the UK, Scandinavia and Australia. In North-America, some producers of Happy Hardcore are now creating music in the Freeform style, usually distributed on the internet, due to the diminishing popularity of Happy Hardcore, and relative rarity of venues, raves and Electronic Music events that offer live Happy Hardcore performances. It is even now becoming common place for Happy Hardcore producers to make forays into the Freeform side of Hardcore, even amongst some of the biggest names, such as Gammer, Scott Brown, DJ Weaver, Trixxy, DJ Brisk and many more. It seems as though the Hardcore sound is leaning toward Freeform, with the trend of diminishing interest in Happy Hardcore continuing, even those producers which have not yet produced anything that is entirely classifiable as Freeform are beginning to employ sounds and styles reminiscent of the more experimental genre, including slightly acidic and psychedelic synths.

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The word freeform may refer to:
  • Freeform art
  • Freeform crochet, and (Freeform Knitting) fibre-based craft crochet or knitting done without patterns, multi-directional often mutli-colored/coloured with a great variation of stitches and techniques often incorporating

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Trancecore is a subgenre of hardcore dance music. As the name suggest, it is a fusion of Trance and Hardcore Techno.

Trancecore differentiates itself from other hardcore genres by incorporating many of the hypnotic elements found in trance, layering them over dense hardcore
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4-beat (also known as hardcore or happy hardcore) is a breakbeat style of music that emerged around 1993. It evolved from breakbeat hardcore emanating from the United Kingdom rave scene.
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Bouncy techno (also known as happy gabber, funcore, or tartan techno - see terminology) is a rave hardcore dance music style that developed from around 1992, mostly emanating from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.
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20th century - 21st century
1960s  1970s  1980s  - 1990s -  2000s  2010s  2020s
1996 1997 1998 - 1999 - 2000 2001 2002

Year 1999 (MCMXCIX
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Motto
"Dieu et mon droit" [2]   (French)
"God and my right"
Anthem
"God Save the Queen" [3]
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20th century - 21st century - 22nd century
1970s  1980s  1990s  - 2000s -  2010s  2020s  2030s
2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006

2003 by topic:
News by month
Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun
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Anthem
Maamme   (Finnish)
VÃ¥rt land   (Swedish)
Our Land
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A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. In principle anything that, produces sound, and can somehow be controlled by a person playing it, can serve as a musical instrument.
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Synthesizer is generally any kind of electronic musical instrument, or electronic device capable of producing or manipulating audio tones, such as musical notes, through audio signal processing.
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A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. Drum machines are very useful instruments for a wide variety of musical genres, not just purely electronic music.
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A music sequencer (also MIDI sequencer or just sequencer) is software or hardware designed to create and manage electronic music.

Originally, music sequencers did not include the ability to record audio.
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keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. The most common of these is the piano, which is used in nearly all forms of western music. Other widely used keyboard instruments include various types of organs as well as other mechanical,
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sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. Instead of generating sounds from scratch, however, a sampler starts with multiple recordings (or “samples”) of different sounds, and then plays each back based on how the instrument is
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This is a list of electronic music genres and sub-genres, though for the latter not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article).

  • Ambient
  • Ambient house

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electronic musical instrument is a musical instrument that produces its sounds using electronics. In contrast, the term electric instrument is used to mean instruments whose sound is produced mechanically, and only amplified or altered electronically - for example an electric
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Computer music is music generated or composed with the aid of computers. It also refers to a field of study that examines both the theory and application of new and existing technologies in the areas of music, sound
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Hard Dance is an umbrella term that refers to the grouping of modern electronic dance music genres including Hard House, Nu-NRG, Hard-NRG, Hard Trance, Hardstyle, Jumpstyle & Freeform Hardcore. UK Hardcore & UK Techno is often included in this capacity.
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Happy hardcore is a form of dance music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 165-180 BPM), often coupled with male or female vocals, and saccharine lyrics.
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Sharkey (real name: Jonathan Kneath, born ~1975, Plymouth) is a popular British DJ/MC/producer, and one of the key originators of the freeform genre of hardcore dance music.
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Free jazz is a movement of jazz music developed in the 1950s and 1960s by artists such as Ornette Coleman, Eric Dolphy, Cecil Taylor, Albert Ayler, Joe Harriott, Archie Shepp, Mary Lou Williams, John Tchicai, Bill Dixon, Paul Bley, Hal Russell and Sun Ra.
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Broken beat is an electronic music genre first appearing at the end of the 20th century and pioneered by Goya Music Distribution. Appearing in the western parts of London, the genre is also referred to as West London
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Wonky techno is a style of techno music that is based around breaking from a formulaic 4-4 beat structure and experimenting with new sounds and rhythms. The sound is often distorted, stuttering, broken and warped, with a lot of influence from breakbeat, glitch and electro.
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Bonkers can refer to:

In entertainment

  • Bonkers (TV series), the Disney animated television series.
  • Bonkers (2007 TV series), the ITV comedy television series.

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Happy hardcore is a form of dance music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 165-180 BPM), often coupled with male or female vocals, and saccharine lyrics.
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Hard Trance originated in Germany in the early to mid-90's and is one of the earliest forms of trance. It was one of the most common forms of Trance throughout the decade, characterized by strong kicks, with a very dry and heavy sound.
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A K-complex is an EEG waveform that occurs during stage 2 sleep. It consists of a brief high-voltage peak, usually greater than 100 µV, and lasts for longer than 0.5 seconds. K-complexes are often followed by bursts of sleep spindles.
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UK Hard House or simply Hard House (not to be confused with Chicago hard house) is a style of House music that emerged in the 1990s. Tony De Vit (1957 to 1998) was one of the pioneers of the hard house sound in the early 90's, playing a harder, louder, faster style of dance
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Amy is a given name, a variant of "Aimee", which means beloved in French, from Old French amede, from Latin amāta, feminine singular past participle of amāre "to love".
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Ethos (ἦθος, ἔθος) (plurals: ethe, ethea) is a Greek word originally meaning "accustomed place" (as in
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