George Home, 1st Earl of Dunbar

George Home, 1st Earl of Dunbar, KG, PC (c. 155620 January 1611) was, in the last decade of his life, the most prominent and most influential Scotsman in England. His work lay in the King's Household and in the control of the State Affairs of Scotland and he was the King's chief Scottish advisor. With the full backing and trust of King James he made an impressive — yet brief — career, veering from London to Edinburgh via Berwick-upon-Tweed with astonishing regularity.

In Scotland

George Home was the son and third child of Sir Alexander Home of Manderston, Berwickshire, and was introduced, at the early age of 26, to the Court of sixteen-year-old James IV by a relative, Alexander Home, 6th Lord Home. Establishing himself as a favourite at court, he was in the retinue which accompanied King James IV to Norway and Denmark to collect his future Queen. He was knighted on 4 November 1590, appointed a Privy Counsellor in 1598, and the following year appears as Sheriff of Berwick-upon-Tweed, (by then in England). In 1601 he was made Master of the King's Wardrobe, and on 31 July the same year was appointed one of the Componitors to the Lord High Treasurer, and acceded to that position in September. In 1601 he was also made Provost of Dunbar.

In England

Upon the accession of the latter as James I of England in 1603, Home accompanied his master to London, where he became Chancellor of the Exchequer (and ex officio the Second Lord of the Treasury) from 1603 to 1606. In 1603 he was also appointed to the English Privy Council, and on 1 June that year received a grant as Keeper of the Great Wardrobe for life. On 7 July 1604 he was created Baron Hume of Berwick in the Peerage of England. In 1605 he was created a Knight of the Garter, and, on 3 July, Earl of Dunbar in the Peerage of Scotland. There is evidence that he participated in the interrogation of Guy Fawkes in the immediate aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

Landed interests

Of these, on the 27 September 1603 he received the manor and castle of Norham with its fishing rights on the River Tweed. On 12 December he had a Royal Charter giving him custody and captaincy of the Castle of St Andrews. In July 1605 he had a confirmation of all the lands previously granted to him incorporated and combined into a free earldom, Lordship of Parliament, and Barony of Dunbar.

Religious affairs

In 1608, Home journeyed to Scotland with George Abbot (Archbishop of Canterbury) to arrange to promote the Episcopal Church, and to seek some sort of union between the Church of England and Church of Scotland. King James was pleased with the initial results, although the hoped-for Union never occurred and the gulf between the King and the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland widened. In July 1605 some nineteen ministers assembled at Aberdeen in defiance of the King's prohibition against the General Assembly meeting. Six of them were subsequently imprisoned in Blackness Castle near Linlithgow, and there, on 10 January 1606, the Earl of Dunbar came from London to be present at their trial and to act as the assessor. Everything was done that could be done by him to win a verdict for the King against the six ministers and it is said that he "brought plenty of money with him to purchase a verdict". In addition, the Earl himself selected the 15 jurymen, five of whom were Homes, his relatives. But even then the jury could not agree. In the end it was a majority verdict of nine against six in favour of the guilty verdict. Regardless of the irregularities, the verdict stood, and established the law that it was High Treason for any minister of the Established Church to dispute the authority of the King and the Privy Council in religious matters.

Death

The Earl of Dunbar died in Whitehall, London, in 1611, without male issue, whereupon the earldom became dormant [1] and the barony became dormant[2] or extinct. He left two daughters: His body was embalmed, but his funeral service did not take place in Westminster until April, after which his body was placed in a lead coffin and sent to Scotland where it was buried under the floor of Dunbar parish church, midway between the font and the pulpit. A magnificent monument, said to be finer than any in Westminster Abbey, was erected in his honour, which is still the distinguishing feature of the interior of this church.

References

1. ^ The Complete Peerage, 1912, Cockayne, V Gibbs eds., Vol IV, p511
2. ^ The Complete Peerage, 1912, Cockayne, V Gibbs eds., Vol IV, p511
  • George Home, Earl of Dunbar, three lectures by the Reverend J Kirk, MC, CF, (Minister of Dunbar Parish Church 1913-1918), Edinburgh, 1918.
  • MSS of Colonel Mordaunt-Hay of Duns Castle, Historical Manuscripts Commission, collection no.5, 1909, page 66, number 180. His lordship is cited as deceased, and although the daughters are mentioned, there is nothing to indicate either of them assuming the peerage.
Political offices
Preceded by
John Fortescue
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1603–1606
Succeeded by
Sir Julius Caesar
Vacant
Title last held by
The 3rd Earl of Cumberland
Lord Lieutenant of Cumberland,
Northumberland,
and Westmorland
jointly with The 4th Earl of Cumberland
The Earl of Suffolk
Lord de Clifford

1607–1611
Succeeded by
The 4th Earl of Cumberland
The Earl of Suffolk
Lord de Clifford
Peerage of Scotland
New titleEarl of Dunbar
1605–1612
Extinct
Lord Hume of Berwick
1604–1612


The Most Noble Order of the Garter is a medieval English order of chivalry or knighthood, and the pinnacle of the British honours system. Membership in it is limited to the Sovereign, the Prince of Wales and no more than twenty-four members, or Companions; men are known as Knights
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Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. The Privy Council was formerly a powerful institution, but its substantial decisions are now controlled by one of its committees, the Cabinet.
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January 20 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

In astrology, it is the cusp day between Capricorn and Aquarius.
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James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I.

He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary, Queen of Scots.
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Berwick-upon-Tweed

Population 11,665 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference NT995525
District Berwick-upon-Tweed
Shire county Northumberland
Region North East
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Manderston House, Duns, Berwickshire, Scotland, is the home of Adrian Bailie Nottage Palmer, 4th Baron Palmer. It was completely rebuilt between 1901-03 and has sumptuous interiors with a solid silver staircase.
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Berwickshire or the County of Berwick is today a registration county, a committee area of the Scottish Borders Council, and a lieutenancy area of Scotland, on the border with England.
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James IV may refer to:
  • James IV of Majorca (circa 1336-1375), King of Majorca
  • James IV of Scotland (1473-1513), Duke of Rothesay
  • James Gamble Rogers IV (1937-1991), folk artist
  • James H. Burnley IV (born 1948), American politician and lawyer
  • James R.

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James IV may refer to:
  • James IV of Majorca (circa 1336-1375), King of Majorca
  • James IV of Scotland (1473-1513), Duke of Rothesay
  • James Gamble Rogers IV (1937-1991), folk artist
  • James H. Burnley IV (born 1948), American politician and lawyer
  • James R.

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Motto
Royal: Alt for Norge ("Everything for Norway")
1814 Eidsvoll oath:
Enige og tro til Dovre faller
("United and faithful until the mountains of Dovre crumble")

Anthem
Ja, vi elsker

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Motto
none
(Royal motto: Guds hjælp, Folkets kærlighed, Danmarks styrke
"The Help of God, the Love of the People, the Strength of Denmark" )
Anthem
Der er et yndigt land  (national)
Kong Christian
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A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically in a monarchy.

The word "privy" means "private" or "secret" thus a privy council was originally a committee of the monarch's closest advisors to give confidential advice on affairs of state.
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Berwick-upon-Tweed

Population 11,665 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference NT995525
District Berwick-upon-Tweed
Shire county Northumberland
Region North East
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Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer is an ancient English (after 1707, British) government position. The holder of the post is third highest of the Great Officers of State, ranking below the Lord High Chancellor and above the Lord President of the Council.
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Dunbar
Gaelic - Dùn Barra

UK Parliament East Lothian
Scottish Parliament East Lothian
European Parliament
List of places: City of Edinburgh


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The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. Often simply called The Chancellor, the office-holder controls HM Treasury and plays a role akin to the posts of
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The Second Lord of the Treasury is a member of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom. Since 1827, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has always simultaneously held the office of Second Lord of the Treasury when he has not also been
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16th century - 17th century - 18th century
1570s  1580s  1590s  - 1600s -  1610s  1620s  1630s
1600 1601 1602 - 1603 - 1604 1605 1606

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8th century - 9th century - 10th century
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Baron (Lord) Hume of Berwick is a title which has been created twice in the Peerages of England and Great Britain.

First creation

The title was first created as Baron Hume of Berwick in the peerage of England on July 7, 1604, for George Home, Lord Treasurer of Scotland,
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The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.
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16th century - 17th century - 18th century
1570s  1580s  1590s  - 1600s -  1610s  1620s  1630s
1602 1603 1604 - 1605 - 1606 1607 1608

:
Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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The Most Noble Order of the Garter is a medieval English order of chivalry or knighthood, and the pinnacle of the British honours system. Membership in it is limited to the Sovereign, the Prince of Wales and no more than twenty-four members, or Companions; men are known as Knights
..... Click the link for more information.
The title Earl of Dunbar, also called Earl of Lothian or Earl of March, was a the head of a comital lordship in south-eastern Scotland between the early 12th century and the early 15th century.
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The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707 . With that year's Act of Union, the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England were combined into the Kingdom of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of
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Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), was a member of a group of English Roman Catholics who attempted to carry out the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament and kill King James I of England, to destroy Protestant rule by killing the
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Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was a failed attempt by a group of provincial English Catholics to kill King James I of England, his family, and most of the Protestant aristocracy in a single attack by blowing up the Houses of Parliament during the State Opening.
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Norham

Norham (United Kingdom)

Norham shown within the United Kingdom
Population 536 (Parish -2001 Census)
OS grid reference
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