Jewish Theological Seminary





The Jewish Theological Seminary of America




Inscription on Seal "והסנה איננו אכל" (Ve-Hasneh Ainenu Ukkal "And the Bush was not consumed") -Exodus 3:2
Established 1886
School type Private
Chancellor Dr. Arnold Eisen
Location New York City, New York, USA
Campus Urban
Homepage www.jtsa.edu
The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. Along with the American Jewish University in Los Angeles, Seminario Rabínico Latinoamericano in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem, it is one the movement's main rabbinical seminaries. It takes its name and basic ideology from the no longer extant Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau.

University

The Jewish Theological Seminary comprises five schools: Albert A. List College of Jewish Studies,which offers double degree programs with both Columbia University and Barnard College, The Graduate School, The William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education, H.L. Miller Cantorial School and College of Jewish Music, and The Rabbinical School. The latter four schools are graduate schools.

The Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau

Rabbi Zecharias Frankel (1801-1875) at one time was in the traditional wing of the nascent Reform Judaism movement. After the second Reform rabbinic conference (1845, Frankfurt, Germany) he resigned after coming to believe that their positions were exceedingly radical. In 1854 he became the head of a new rabbinical school, the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau. In his magnum opus Darkhei HaMishnah (Ways of the Mishnah) Rabbi Frankel amassed scholarly support which showed that Jewish law was not static, but rather had always developed in response to changing conditions. He called his approach towards Judaism 'Positive-Historical', which meant that one should accept Jewish law and tradition as normative, yet one must be open to changing and developing the law in the same historical fashion that Judaism has always historically developed.

Positive-Historical Judaism in America

About this time in America, Rabbi Sabato Morais championed the reaction to American Reform. At one time Rabbi Morais had been a voice for moderation within the coalition of Reformers. He had opposed the more radical changes, but was open to moderate changes that would not offend traditional sensibilities. After the Reform movement published the Pittsburgh Platform, Rabbi Morais recognized the futility of his efforts and began the creation of a new rabbinical school in New York City. He was soon joined by Rabbi Alexander Kohut and Rabbi Bernard Drachman, both of whom had received semicha (rabbinic ordination) at Rabbi Frankel's Breslau seminary. They shaped the curriculum and philosophy of the new school after Rabbi Frankel's seminary.

In 1902, Professor Solomon Schechter assumed presidency of JTS. In a series of papers he articulated an ideology for the nascent movement. In 1913 he presided over the creation of the United Synagogue of America. (The name was changed in 1991 to the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism.)

Prominent professors at the Seminary were such luminaries as Saul Lieberman, Alexander Marx, Louis Ginzberg and Louis Finkelstein and others as well.

Between 1940 and 1985, the Jewish Theological Seminary produced a radio and television show called "The Eternal Light." The show aired on Sunday afternoons, featuring well-known Jewish personalities like Chaim Potok and Elie Wiesel. Broadcasts did not involve preaching or prayer, but drew on history, literature and social issues to explore Judaism and Jewish holidays in a manner that was accessible to persons of any faith.

Admission of GLBT students

Effective March 26, 2007, the Jewish Theological Seminary accepts openly gay students into their rabbinical and cantorial programs. An announcement in the press, first posted on the school's website and typified by Haaretz.com has been made about the admission of and ordination of homosexual students for the rabbinate and for cantorship.

A Conservative Jewish seminary in New York has agreed to admit gays and lesbians who want to become rabbis and cantors, but declined to take a stand on whether rabbis should officiate at same-sex unions.

The Jewish Theological Seminary announced its decision yesterday, more than three months after the Rabbinical Assembly's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards authorized the ordination of gays and lesbians.

Notable Faculty

Notable alumni

External links and references

See also

18th century - 19th century - 20th century
1850s  1860s  1870s  - 1880s -  1890s  1900s  1910s
1883 1884 1885 - 1886 - 1887 1888 1889

:
Subjects:     Archaeology - Architecture -
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worldwide view of the subject.
Please [ improve this article] or discuss the issue on the talk page.
For the film of this title, see Private School (film).

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Arnold (Arnie) Eisen, Ph.D. (b. 1951) is Koshland Professor of Jewish Culture and Religion and Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1986.
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City of New York
New York City at sunset

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Nickname: The Big Apple, Gotham, The City that Never Sleeps
Location in the state of New York
Coordinates:
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State of New York

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Nickname(s): The Empire State
Motto(s): Excelsior!

Official language(s) None

Capital Albany
Largest city New York City

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Motto
"In God We Trust"   (since 1956)
"E Pluribus Unum"   ("From Many, One"; Latin, traditional)
Anthem
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An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. This term is at one end of the spectrum of suburban and rural areas. An urban area is more frequently called a city or town.
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Conservative Judaism, (also known as Masorti Judaism in Israel predominantly), is a modern stream of Judaism that arose out of intellectual currents in Germany in the mid-19th century and took institutional form in the United States in the early 1900s.
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American Jewish University, formerly the separate institutions University of Judaism and Brandeis-Bardin Institute, is a Jewish, non-denominational and highly eclectic institution.
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The Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, located in Jerusalem, is an important academic and spiritual center of Conservative Judaism. It serves as one of the movement's main rabbinical seminaries alongside The Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York City, the
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List College (known in full as the Albert A. List College of Jewish Studies is the undergraduate school of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Students of the College are also either students at the Columbia University School of General Studies (a program known as
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Rabbi, in Judaism, means a religious ‘teacher’, or more literally, ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word
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Zecharias Frankel (30 September, 1801–13 February 1875) was a Bohemian-German rabbi and a historian who studied the historical development of Judaism. He was born in Prague and died in Breslau (modern day Wrocław).
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Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of American Jews[1][2] and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in
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Anthem
"Das Lied der Deutschen" (third stanza)
also called "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit"
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Das Jüdisch-Theologisches Seminar (Fränckelscher Stiftung), The Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau

Institution in Breslau for the training of rabbis, founded under the will of Jonas Fränckel, and opened in 1854.
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Rabbinic Literature
Talmudic literature
Mishnah • Tosefta
Jerusalem Talmud • Babylonian Talmud
Minor tractates

Halakhic Midrash
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Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halakhah, Halocho, and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot
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Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people, based on principles and ethics embodied in the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the Talmud. According to Jewish tradition, the history of Judaism begins with the Covenant between God and Abraham (ca.
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Sabato Morais (April 13, 1823–November 11, 1897) was an American Jewish rabbi, leader of Mikveh Israel Synagogue, and founder of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City.

Early Years

Morais was born in Leghorn, Italy.
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Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of American Jews[1][2] and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in
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City of New York
New York City at sunset

Flag
Seal
Nickname: The Big Apple, Gotham, The City that Never Sleeps
Location in the state of New York
Coordinates:
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Alexander Kohut (April 22, 1842, Kiskunfélegyháza, Hungary – May 25, 1894, New York) was a rabbi and orientalist. He belonged to a family of rabbis, the most noted among them being Rabbi Israel Palota, his great-grandfather, Rabbi Amram (called "The Gaon," who died in Safed,
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Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman (1861, New York City - March 12, 1945, New York City) was a leader of Orthodox Judaism in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Drachman was born to parents that where immigrants from Galicia and Bavaria.
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Semicha (Hebrew: סמיכה‎, "leaning [of the hands]"), also semichut (Hebrew: סמיכות
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Solomon Schechter (December 7, 1847-1915) was a Moldavian-born Romanian and English rabbi, academic scholar, and educator, most famous for his roles as founder and President of the United Synagogue of America, President of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and architect
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The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) is the primary organization of synagogues practicing Conservative Judaism in North America. It closely works with the Rabbinical Assembly, the international body of Conservative Rabbis, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
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Saul Lieberman (1898-1983), also known as The Gra"sh (Gaon Rabbeinu Shaul), was a rabbi and a scholar of Talmud. He served as Professor of Talmud at the Jewish Theological Seminary for over 40 years, and was for many years, head of the
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Alexander Marx (1878-1953), historian, bibliographer and librarian.

Biography

Born in Elberfeld, Germany, Marx grew up in Koenigsberg (East Prussia). He spent a year in a Prussian artillery regiment where he excelled in horsemanship.
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Rabbi Louis Ginzberg was one of the outstanding Talmudists of the twentieth century. He was born on November 28, 1873, in Kovno, Lithuania; he died on November 11, 1953, in New York City.
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