John Maxwell Coetzee



John Maxwell Coetzee

Born:9 January 1940 (1940--) (age 67)
Cape Town, South Africa
Occupation:Novelist, Essayist, Literary Critic, Linguist
Nationality: Australia
Influences:Samuel Beckett, Ford Madox Ford, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Daniel Defoe, Franz Kafka


John Maxwell "J.M." Coetzee (IPA: /kʊtˈsiː/ or Afrikaans IPA: [kutˈsiˑe]) (born 9 February 1940) is an author and academic from South Africa (now an Australian citizen living in South Australia). A novelist and literary critic as well as a translator, Coetzee won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Early life and education

Coetzee was born in Cape Town. His father was a lawyer and his mother was a schoolteacher; he is a descendent of early Dutch settlers dating to the 17th century. He also has Polish roots, his great-grandfather Baltazar (or Balcer) Dubiel was a Polish immigrant to South Africa. He spent most of his early life in Cape Town and in Worcester in Western Cape Province as recounted in his fictionalized memoir, Boyhood (1997). He attended St. Joseph's College, a Catholic school in the Cape Town suburb of Rondebosch, and later studied mathematics and English at the University of Cape Town, receiving his Bachelor of Arts with Honours in English in 1960 and his Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Mathematics in 1961.

Academic and literary career

In the early 1960s, Coetzee relocated to London, where he worked for a time at IBM as a computer programmer; and in 1963 he was awarded Master of Arts degree from UCT; his experiences there were later recounted in (2002), his second volume of fictionalized memoirs.

Coetzee received a Ph.D in linguistics at The University of Texas at Austin, where his dissertation was on computer stylistic analysis of the works of Samuel Beckett. After leaving Texas he taught English and literature at the SUNY-Buffalo in New York until 1971. In 1971, Coetzee sought permanent residence in the United States, but it was denied due to his involvement in anti-Vietnam War protests. He then returned to South Africa to become an English literature professor at the University of Cape Town. Upon retiring in 2002, Coetzee relocated to Adelaide, Australia, where he was made an honorary research fellow at the English Department of the University of Adelaide, where his partner, Dorothy Driver, is a fellow academic. He served as professor on the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago until 2003. In addition to his novels, he has published critical works and translations from Dutch and Afrikaans.

On 6 March 2006 Coetzee became an Australian citizen in a ceremony presided over by Australian Immigration Minister Amanda Vanstone. Following the ceremony, Coetzee said that "I was attracted by the free and generous spirit of the people, by the beauty of the land itself and–when I first saw Adelaide–by the grace of the city that I now have the honour of calling my home."[1]

Personality and reputation

He is known as reclusive and eschews publicity to such an extent that he did not collect either of his two Booker Prizes in person. He married in 1963 and divorced in 1980. He had a daughter and a son from the marriage, but his son was killed at the age of 23 in an accident, an event Coetzee confronts in his 1994 novel The Master of Petersburg.

Rian Malan wrote that Coetzee is "a man of almost monkish self-discipline and dedication. He does not drink, smoke or eat meat. He cycles vast distances to keep fit and spends at least an hour at his writing-desk each morning, seven days a week. A colleague who has worked with him for more than a decade claims to have seen him laugh just once. An acquaintance has attended several dinner parties where Coetzee has uttered not a single word." [1]

Achievements and awards

Coetzee has gained many awards throughout his career. The novel Waiting for the Barbarians was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 1980, and he is three times winner of the CNA Prize. Age of Iron was awarded the Sunday Express Book of the Year award, and The Master of Petersburg was awarded the Irish Times International Fiction Prize in 1995. He has also won the French Fémina Prize, the Faber memorial Award, the Commonwealth Literary Award, and in 1987 won the Jerusalem Prize for literature on the freedom of the individual in society.

He was the first author to be awarded the Booker Prize twice: first for Life & Times of Michael K in 1983, and again for Disgrace in 1999. Only one author has matched this since - Peter Carey, an Australian.

On 2 October 2003 it was announced that he was to be the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the fourth African writer to be so honoured, and the second (as he then was) South African (after Nadine Gordimer). When awarded the prize, he was praised for "in innumerable guises portraying the involvement of the outsider." The press release for the award cited his "well-crafted composition, pregnant dialogue, and analytical brilliance," while focusing on the moral nature of his work. The prize ceremony was held in Stockholm on 10 December 2003.

Coetzee was awarded the Order of Mapungubwe by the South African government on 27 September 2005 for his "exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage."

Bibliography

Fiction

Fictionalised autobiography

  • (1997) ISBN 0-14-026566-X
  • (2002) ISBN 0-670-03102-X

Non-fiction

  • (1988) ISBN 0-300-03974-3
  • (1992) ISBN 0-674-21518-4
  • (1997) ISBN 0-226-11176-8
  • The Lives of Animals (1999) ISBN 0-691-07089-X
  • (2002) ISBN 0-14-200137-6
  • (2007) NY Times Review is available.

Translations/Introductions

See also

References

1. ^ JM Coetzee becomes an Australian citizen. Mail & Guardian online (2006-03-06). Retrieved on 2007-08-18.

External links


John Maxwell Coetzee
Novels
Dusklands (1974) • In the Heart of the Country (1977) • Waiting for the Barbarians (1980) • Life & Times of Michael K (1983) • Foe (1986) • Age of Iron (1990) • The Master of Petersburg (1994) • Disgrace (1999) • Elizabeth Costello (2003) • Slow Man (2005) • Diary of a Bad Year (2007)
Essays
(1988) • (1992) • (1996) • The Lives of Animals (1999) • (2001)
Autobiographical works
(1997) • (2002)
This box:     [ edit]


Persondata
NAMECoetzee, John Maxwell
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTIONContemporary South African novelist, translator and academic (now living in Australia), won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature
DATE OF BIRTH9 February, 1940
PLACE OF BIRTHCape Town, South Africa
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Coetzee may refer to:
  • Jeff Coetzee, South African tennis player
  • John Maxwell Coetzee, South African-Australian author
  • Basil Coetzee, South African musician
  • Gerrie Coetzee, South African boxer

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January 9 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 475 - Byzantine Emperor Zeno is forced to flee his capital at Constantinople.

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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
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Year 1940 (MCMXL
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Cape Town
Kaapstad, iKapa

Panorama of the Cape Town city bowl from the Waterfront to Table Mountain

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Nationality is a relationship between a person and their state of origin, culture, association, affiliation and/or loyalty. Nationality affords the state jurisdiction over the person, and affords the person the protection of the state.
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Anthem
Advance Australia Fair [1]


Capital Canberra

Largest city Sydney
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Samuel Beckett

Pseudonym: Andrew Belis (Recent Irish Poetry)[1]
Born: 13 March 1906(1906--)
Foxrock, Dublin, Ireland
Died: 22 November 1989 (aged 83)
Paris, France
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Ford Madox Ford

Pseudonym: Ford Hermann Hueffer, Ford Madox Hueffer
Born: November 17 1873(1873--)
Merton, Surrey
Died: May 26 1939 (aged 67)
Deauville, France
Occupation: novelist, publisher
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Fyodor Dostoevsky

Born: November 11 1821(1821--)
Moscow, Russian Empire
Died: January 9 1881 (aged 61)
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Occupation: Novelist
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Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe
Born: 1659 / 1661 (?)

Died: 24 April 1731 (?)

Occupation: Writer, journalist, spy
Genres: Adventure
Influenced: Johann Wyss, Jonathan Swift

Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] – April 24 [?], 1731)
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Franz Kafka

Photograph of Franz Kafka taken in 1906
Born: July 3 1883(1883--)
Prague, Austria-Hungary
Died: May 3 1924 (aged 42)
Kierling near Vienna, Austria
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This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language.

See International Phonetic Alphabet for English for a more complete version and Pronunciation respelling for English for phonetic
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International Phonetic Alphabet

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The International
Phonetic Alphabet
History
Nonstandard symbols
Extended IPA
Naming conventions
IPA for English The
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February 9 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 474 - Zeno crowned as co-emperor of the Byzantine Empire.

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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1910s  1920s  1930s  - 1940s -  1950s  1960s  1970s
1937 1938 1939 - 1940 - 1941 1942 1943

Year 1940 (MCMXL
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novel (from, Italian novella, Spanish novela, French nouvelle for "new", "news", or "short story of something new") is today a long prose narrative set out in writing.
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Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often informed by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of its methods and goals.
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Nobel Prize in Literature (Swedish: Nobelpriset i litteratur) is awarded annually to an author from any country who has, in the words from the will of Alfred Nobel, produced "the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency" (original Swedish:
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Cape Town
Kaapstad, iKapa

Panorama of the Cape Town city bowl from the Waterfront to Table Mountain

Flag
Nickname: The mother city, or The Tavern of the Seas
Motto:
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Motto
none1
Anthem
Mazurek Dąbrowskiego   (Polish)
Dąbrowski's Mazurek
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Worcester, in the Western Cape South Africa, with a population of 76,894, is the largest town in the Breede River Valley. Located 120km north-east of Cape Town on the N1 highway north to Johannesburg, it is the administrative capital of the Breede Valley Local Municipality and the
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The Western Cape is a province in the south west of South Africa. The capital is Cape Town. Prior to 1994, the region that now forms the Western Cape was part of the huge (and now defunct) Cape Province.
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Catholic schools are education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church. These schools aim to develop their students through participation in the sacramental life of the Church, study of religion and theology, a full curriculum in secular subjects, and a variety of extra-curricular
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Rondebosch is one of the Southern Suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa. It is bordered by the suburbs of Rosebank, Rondebosch East, Claremont, Newlands, and the slopes of Devil's Peak.
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Mathematics (colloquially, maths or math) is the body of knowledge centered on such concepts as quantity, structure, space, and change, and also the academic discipline that studies them. Benjamin Peirce called it "the science that draws necessary conclusions".
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English}}} 
Writing system: Latin (English variant) 
Official status
Official language of: 53 countries
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: en
ISO 639-2: eng
ISO 639-3: eng  
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University of Cape Town (UCT), is a public university located on the Rhodes Estate on the slopes of Devil's Peak, in Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. UCT was founded in 1829 as the South African College, and is the oldest university in South Africa.
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Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B., from the Latin language, and four years in Scotland, the Republic of Ireland, the rest of Canada and the United States.
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