KG-84

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KG-84A and KG-84C. US Navy photo.
The KG-84A and KG-84C are encryption devices developed by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) to ensure secure transmission of digital data. The KG-84C is a Dedicated Loop Encryption Device (DLED), and both devices are General-Purpose Telegraph Encryption Equipment (GPTEE). The KG-84A is primarily used for point-to-point encrypted communications via landline, microwave, and satellite systems. The KG-84C is an outgrowth of the U.S. Navy high frequency (HF) communications program and supports these needs. The KG-84A and KG-84C are devices that operate in simplex, half-duplex, or full-duplex modes. The KG-84C contains all of the KG-84 and KG-84A modes, plus a variable update counter, improved HF performance, synchronous out-of-sync detection, asynchronous cipher text, plain text, bypass, and European TELEX protocol. The KG-84 (A/C) is certified to handle data at all levels of security. The KG-84 (A/C) is a Controlled Cryptographic Item (CCI) and is unclassified when unkeyed. Keyed KG-84 equipment assumes the classification level equal to that of the keying material used.

Characteristics

KG-84 A/C physical characteristics

  • Height 7.8 in (198 mm)
  • Width 7.5 in (191 mm)
  • Depth 15 in (381 mm)
  • Weight 23 lb (10 kg)

Data rate

  • KG-84A 256 kbit/s synchronous and 9.6 kbit/s asynchronous
  • KG-84C Up to 64 kbit/s synchronous and 9.6 kbit/s asynchronous

Power

  • 24 V DC, 15 W
  • 115 V AC
  • 220 V AC

Operating temperature

0 to 55 °C

MTBF

69,000 hours

External links

encryption is the process of transforming information (referred to as plaintext) to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing special knowledge, usually referred to as a key.
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Motto
"In God We Trust"   (since 1956)
"E Pluribus Unum"   ("From Many, One"; Latin, traditional)
Anthem
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National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS) is the United States government's cryptologic organization that was officially established on November 4, 1952. Responsible for the collection and analysis of foreign communications, it coordinates, directs, and performs
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landline, main line or fixed-line is a telephone line which travels through a solid medium, either metal wire or optical fibre. This is distinguished from a mobile cellular line, where the medium used is the airwaves.
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Microwaves are electromagnetic waves with wavelengths shorter than one meter and longer than one millimeter, or frequencies between 300 megahertz and 300 gigahertz.
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communications satellite (sometimes abbreviated to comsat) is an artificial satellite stationed in space for the purposes of telecommunications. Modern communications satellites use a variety of orbits including geostationary orbits, Molniya orbits, other elliptical orbits
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United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. The U.S. Navy currently has over 340,000 personnel on active duty and nearly 128,000 in the Navy Reserve.
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High frequency (HF) radio frequencies are between 3 and 30 MHz. Also known as the decameter band or decameter wave as the wavelengths range from one to ten decameters. Shortwave (2.310 - 25.820 MHz) overlaps and is slightly lower than HF.
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Simplex communication is a name for a type of communication circuit. There are two (contradictory) definitions that have been used for the term. In both cases, the other definition is referred to as half duplex.
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A duplex communication system is a system composed of two connected parties or devices which can communicate with one another in both directions. (The term duplex is not used when describing communication between more than two parties or devices.
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A duplex communication system is a system composed of two connected parties or devices which can communicate with one another in both directions. (The term duplex is not used when describing communication between more than two parties or devices.
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A Controlled Cryptographic Item (CCI) is a U.S. National Security Agency term for secure telecommunications or information handling equipment, associated cryptographic component or other hardware item which performs a critical COMSEC function.
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Classified may refer to:
  • Classified information — sensitive information to which access is restricted by law or regulation to particular classes of people.
  • Classified advertising
  • Classified — rapper from Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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key is a piece of information (a parameter) that controls the operation of a cryptographic algorithm. In encryption, a key specifies the particular transformation of plaintext into ciphertext, or vice versa during decryption.
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rotor machine is an electro-mechanical device used for encrypting and decrypting secret messages. Rotor machines were the cryptographic state-of-the-art for a brief but prominent period of history; they were in widespread use in the 1930s–1950s.
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Combined Cipher Machine (CCM) (or Combined Cypher Machine) was a common cipher machine system for securing Allied communications during World War II and for a few years after amongst NATO.
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Enigma cipher machine
  • Enigma machine
  • Enigma rotor details
  • Cryptanalysis of the Enigma
  • Cyclometer

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Fialka (M-125) is the name of a Cold War-era Soviet cipher machine. A rotor machine, the device uses 10 rotors, each with 30 contacts along with mechanical pins to control stepping. It also makes use of a punch card mechanism. "Fialka" means "violet" in Russian.
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The Hebern Rotor Machine was an electro-mechanical encryption machine built by combining the mechanical parts of a standard typewriter with the electrical parts of an electric typewriter, connecting the two through a scrambler.
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HX-63 was an advanced rotor machine designed by Crypto AG, who started the design in 1952. The machine had nine rotors, each with 41 contacts. There were 26 keyboard inputs and outputs, leaving 15 wires to "loop back" through the rotors via a different path.
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The TSEC/KL-7, code named ADONIS, was a rotor machine encryption system introduced in the 1950s by the U.S. National Security Agency. It had eight rotors, seven of which moved in a complex pattern. The non-moving rotor was in the middle of the stack.
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The Lacida (or LCD) was a rotor cipher machine designed before World War II by the Polish Cipher Bureau for wartime use by Polish higher commands. Its name derived from the initials of Gwido Langer, Maksymilian Ci
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M-325, also known as SIGFOY, was an American rotor machine designed by William F. Friedman in 1936. Between 1944 and 1946, more than 1,100 machines were deployed within the United States Foreign Service. Its use was discontinued in 1946 because of faults in operation.
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Mercury was a British cipher machine used by the Air Ministry from 1950 until at least the early 1960s. Mercury was an online rotor machine descended from Typex, but modified to achieve a longer cycle length using a so-called double-drum basket system.
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NEMA (NEue MAschine) ("new machine"), also designated the T-D (Tasten-Druecker-Maschine) ("key-stroke machine"), was a 10-wheel rotor machine designed by the Swiss Army during World War II as a replacement for their Enigma machines.
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OMI cryptograph was a rotor cipher machine produced and sold by Italian firm Ottico Meccanica Italiana (OMI) in Rome.

The machine had seven rotors, including a reflecting rotor. The rotors stepped regularly.
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Portex (or BID/50/1) was a British cipher machine. A rotor machine, the device used eight rotors each with a tyre ring and an insert. The machine was used mainly by the secret services from the late 1940s to the early 1950s.
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ECM Mark II was a rotor machine used by the United States from World War II (WWII) until the 1950s. The machine was also known as the SIGABA or Converter M-134 by the Army, or CSP-888/889 by the Navy, and a modified Navy version was termed the CSP-2900.
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SIGCUM, also known as Converter M-228, was a rotor cipher machine used to encrypt teletype traffic by the United States Army. Hastily designed by William Friedman and Frank Rowlett, the system was put into service in January 1943 before any rigorous analysis of its security
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BID/60 (Singlet) was a British encryption machine. It was used by the British intelligence services from around 1949 or 1950 onwards. The system is a rotor machine, and would appear to have used 10 rotors.
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