Kapre











Philippine mythology
Title:Kapre
Description:Smoking tree giant
Gender:Male
Region:Philippines
Equivalent:Agta


Kapre (also known as Agta in the Visayan dialect) is a Philippine mythical creature that could be characterized as a tree demon, but with more human characteristics. It is described as being a tall (7 to 9 ft), brown, hairy male with a beard. Kapres are normally described as smoking a big tobacco pipe, whose strong smell would attract human attention. The term kapre comes from the Arabic "kaffir" meaning a non-believer in Islam. The early Arabs and the Moors used it to refer to the non-Muslim Dravidians who were dark-skinned. The term was later brought to the Philippines by the Spanish who had previous contact with the Moors. Some historians speculate that the legend was propagated by the Spanish to prevent Filipinos from assisting any escaped African slaves.

Natural habitat and attire

Kapres are said to dwell in big trees like acacias, mangoes, bamboo and banyan (known in the Philippines as balete). It is also mostly seen sitting under those trees. The Kapre is said to wear the indigenous Northern Philippine loincloth known as bahag, and according to some, often wears a belt which gives the kapre the ability to be invisible to humans. In some versions, the kapre is supposed to hold a magical white stone, a little smaller in size from that of a quail egg, which if obtained by a person, the kapre could grant wishes.

Behavior

Kapres are not necessarily considered to be evil, unlike the manananggal. Kapres may make contact with people to offer friendship, or if it is attracted to a woman. If a kapre befriends any human, especially because of love, the kapre will consistently follow its "love interest" throughout life.

Kapres are also said to play pranks on people, frequently making travelers become disoriented and lose their way in the mountains or in the woods. It is also believe to have the ability to confuse people even at their own familiar surroundings; for instance, someone who forgets that they are in their own garden or home are said to be have been tricked by a kapre. Reports of experiencing kapre enchantment include that of witnessing rustling tree branches even if the wind is not strong. Another example would be hearing loud laughter or voice coming from an unseen being; witnessing lots of smoke from the top of a tree; seeing big fiery eyes during night time from a tree; as well as actually seeing a kapre walking by in forested areas. It is also believed that abundant fireflies in woody areas are the embers from the kapre's lit tobacco.

See also

Topics on Philippine Mythology and Folklore
    [ e]
General:Creation stories Religion Deities
Important beings:Bathala Kalantiaw Kan-Laon
Heroes, creatures and spirits:Philippine mythical creatures Alan Aswang Bakunawa Batibat Bernardo Carpio Diwata Duwende Ekek Hantu Demon Ibong Adarna Juan Tamad Kalantiaw Kapre Kumakatok Lam-ang Malakas and Maganda Mambabarang Manananggal Manaul Mangkukulam Maria Cacao Mariang Makiling Maria Sinukuan Mayari Nuno sa punso Pugot Sarimanok Sigbin Sirena Siyokoy Tala Tikbalang Tiyanak Princess Urduja
Mythical and sacred places:Mount Arayat Mount Banahaw Mount Lantoy Mount Makiling Mount Pinatubo
Medicine-men:Albularyo Babaylan Hilot
Mythical objects:Agimat Anito
Literary sources:Philippine literature Philippine folk literature Cebuano literature Code of Kalantiaw Gab Hiligaynon literature Hinilawod Ilokano literature Irong-Irong Maragtas Philippine epic poetry Tagalog literature The Stories of Grandma Basyang Waray literature
    Philippine mythology and folklore include a collection of tales and superstitions about magical creatures and entities. Some Filipinos, even though heavily Westernized and Christianized, still believe in such entities.
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    Visayan languages of the Philippines, along with Tagalog and Bikol, are part of the Central Philippine language family. Most Visayan languages are spoken in the Visayas region but they are also spoken in the Bicol Region (particularly in Sorsogon and Masbate), islands south of
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    beard is the hair that grows on a man's chin, cheeks, neck, and the area above the upper lip (the opposite is a clean-shaven face). When differentiating between upper and lower facial hair, a beard specifically refers to the facial hair on the lower part of a man's chin (excluding
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    Tobacco has been growing on the American Continent since about 6000 BC and began being used by native cultures at about 3000 BC.
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    Acacia
    Miller

    Species

    About 1,300; see List of Acacia species

    Acacia is a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae, first described in Africa by the Swedish botanist Linnaeus in 1773.
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    Mangifera
    L.

    Species

    About 35 species, including:
    Mangifera altissima
    Mangifera applanata
    Mangifera caesia
    Mangifera camptosperma
    Mangifera casturi
    Mangifera decandra

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    Bambuseae
    Kunth ex Dumort.

    Diversity
    Around 91 genera and 1,000 species

    Subtribes
    • Arthrostylidiinae
    • Arundinariinae
    • Bambusinae
    • Chusqueinae
    • Guaduinae
    • Melocanninae
    • Nastinae
    • Racemobambodinae
    • Shibataeinae

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    worldwide view of the subject.
    Please [ improve this article] or discuss the issue on the talk page.


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