Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Enlarge picture
Skyline of Lancaster city, dominated by the W.W. Griest Building.
Skyline of Lancaster city, dominated by the W.W. Griest Building.

Seal
Nickname: The Red Rose City
Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania
Enlarge picture
Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County
Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County
Country  United States
State  Pennsylvania
County Lancaster
Founded 1730
Incorporated March 10, 1818
Government
 - Mayor Rick Gray (D)
Area
 - City 19.2 km  (7.4 sq mi)
Elevation 112 m (368 ft)
Population (2003)
 - City 55,381
 - Density 2940.0/km (0/sq mi)
 - Urban 55,561
 - Metro 494,486
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: [1]
Lancaster, is a city in the South Central part of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and is the county seat of Lancaster County. With a population of 55,351,[1] it is the 8th largest city in Pennsylvania, behind Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown, Erie, Reading, Scranton, and Bethlehem. The metropolitan area population stands at 494,486 making it the 101st largest metropolitan area in the US.

Locally, Lancaster is pronounced as LANK-i-stir, rather than the more common pronunciation LANG-CAS-ter (with the first two syllables more or less equally stressed).

History

Geography

Lancaster is located at 40°2'23" North, 76°18'16" West (40.039860, -76.304366)GR1, and is 368 feet above sea level.

The city is located about 34 miles southeast of Harrisburg, 70 miles west of Philadelphia, 55 miles north-northeast of Baltimore and 87 miles north of Washington, D.C.

The nearest towns and boroughs are Millersville (4.0 miles), Willow Street (4.8 miles), East Petersburg (5.3 miles), Lititz (7.9 miles), Landisville (8.6 miles), Mountville (8.8 miles), Rothsville (8.9 miles), and Leola (8.9 miles).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.2 km² (7.4 mi²). 19.2 km² (7.4 mi²) of it is land and 0.14% is water.

Architecture

Here are the main types of architecture that still dominate the city of Lancaster, with a local example of each.

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 56,348 people, 20,933 households, and 12,162 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,940.0/km² (7,616.5/mi²). There were 23,024 housing units at an average density of 1,201.3/km² (3,112.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 61.55% White, 14.09% African American, 0.44% Native American, 2.46% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 17.44% from other races, and 3.94% from two or more races. 30.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

In 2000, 24.34% of Lancaster residents were of Puerto Rican ancestry. The city has the highest concentration of Puerto Ricans in Pennsylvania. For this reason, it is sometimes referred to as the "Spanish Rose." Lancaster celebrates its Hispanic heritage once every year with the Puerto Rican Festival, which is in its 27th year[9].

There were 20,933 households out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.4% were married couples living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.9% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 13.9% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 17.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,770, and the median income for a family was $34,623. Males had a median income of $27,833 versus $21,862 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,955. 21.2% of the population and 17.9% of families were below the poverty line. 29.2% of those under the age of 18 and 12.9% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Economy

Lancaster suffers from high unemployment, especially in the southeastern quadrant.[10]This area, which includes census tracts 8, 9, 15, and 16, had unemployment rates of 10.9%, 10.1%, 3.5%, and 9.0% , respectively, in 1999, when the rest of the county was 4.9%. The Lancaster County Workforce Investment Board sees a persistent problem in underemployment: "People are working but surviving just on the edge of poverty." Outside the city, however, employment has increased 18% by adding 34,900 jobs between the years 1999 and 2002.

Lancaster City has been in the process of recreating itself recently with an explosion of specialty shops, boutiques, bars, clubs, and reinvestment in downtown institutions and locations.

Since 1999,[2] the Lancaster County Convention Center Authority, Penn Square Partners and the City's Redevelopment Authority have pursued a controversial plan to build a 300-room Marriott Hotel and a 220,000-square-foot taxpayer funded convention venue in and near the space formerly occupied by the Watt & Shand department store, preserving only the building's façade.[3] The project's supporters believe it would promote the revitalization of the city's center. Its opponents, however, feel it poses a significant risk to taxpayers. [4][5] This plan also includes the demolition of significant portions of other historic sites, including Thaddeus Stevens' home. [6]

There are also plans to convert an area of unused polluted industrial grounds, which were once occupied by Armstrong World Industries, into playing fields for Franklin & Marshall College. This action is expected to take up most of the former industrial site. The northeastern corner will be developed with funds from Lancaster General Hospital. The hospital plans to create a mixed-use development which will add several city blocks to Lancaster’s grid. F&M's president, John Fry, has also orchestrated the construction of new dormitories and apartments for Franklin & Marshall students along Harrisburg Pike.

Public Transportation

The Red Rose Transit Authority (RRTA) provides local bus transit to Lancaster City as well as surrounding areas in Lancaster County. RRTA is headquartered outside the City of Lancaster.

Capitol Trailways provides intercity bus transit from the Lancaster train station to King of Prussia, Philadelphia, and New York City.

Amtrak also serves the Lancaster train station, located at 53 McGovern Ave. Lancaster is served by Amtrak trains traveling between Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and Pittsburgh. [7] The city is served by the Lancaster Airport, located north of downtown and just south of Lititz.

Notable residents

See also:

Historical Landmarks

Hamilton Watch Company
Watt & Shand Building (since demolished, only the façade remains)
W.W. Griest Building
Wheatland
Fulton Opera House
J. P. McCaskey High School
Rock Ford plantation'''

Sports



Club Sport League Venue
Lancaster BarnstormersBaseballAtlantic League of Professional BaseballClipper Magazine Stadium

Baseball

Enlarge picture
Clipper Magazine Stadium
The city of Lancaster has only one professional sports team, the Lancaster Barnstormers. After 44 years without professional baseball, the Barnstormers arrived to fill the void left by the departed Lancaster Red Roses. The Lancaster Barnstormers are named after the "barnstorming" baseball players who played exhibition games in the surrounding county, as well as a reference to the county's many farms. The Barnstormers continue a couple of traditions of the old Red Roses, as their official colors are navy blue, red, and khaki, the same colors used by the Red Roses. More importantly, the Barnstormers continue the old baseball rivalry between Lancaster and the nearby city of York, as the York Revolution start their inaugural season in 2007.

The city of Lancaster is the hometown of Major League alumnus, Tom Herr. Herr played for the Philadelphia Phillies, the New York Mets, the San Francisco Giants, and finally with the St. Louis Cardinals. After his time in the Majors, he coached the Black Knights baseball team of Hempfield High School for several years. During this time, Tom Herr had the pleasure of coaching his son, Aaron (who now plays at the AAA level), at Hempfield. Herr joined the Lancaster Barnstomers for their inaugural season in 2005 as the manager. After a dismal 2005 season, he lead the Barnstormers to their first-ever championship in 2006, against the Bridgeport Bluefish. Immediately following Lancaster's Atlantic League victory, Tom Herr piqued the interest of the Washington Nationals, who later assigned him to their A-level Hagerstown Suns.

The Lancaster Barnstormers employ another Major League alumnus, Rick Wise, as their pitching coach.[11] He was the winning pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series. Other than his experience with the Red Sox, he pitched for the Cleveland Indians, the Philadelphia Phillies, the San Diego Padres, and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Other sports

Lancaster Classic

The city of Lancaster hosts the Tom Bamford Lancaster Classic, a professional bicycle racing event held each June since 1992. It is part of the 2006-2007 UCI America Tour and the 2007 USA Cycling Professional Tour.

Inventions

  • The first battery-powered watch, the Hamilton Electric 500, was released in 1957 by the Hamilton Watch Company.
  • Peeps, an Easter confection shaped as marshmallow chicks covered with yellow sugar, were invented by the Rodda Candy Company of Lancaster in the 1920s. In 1953, Rodda was purchased by Sam Born, the Russian immigrant who invented ice cream "jimmies", and production was moved to Nazareth, Pennsylvania.

Colleges and universities

Media

  • Lancaster Intelligencer Journal, the county's morning edition
  • Lancaster New Era, the county's afternoon edition
  • Lancaster Voice
  • La Voz Hispana, the city's Spanish-language edition
  • The Sunday News, the county's weekly edition
  • WGAL, the local NBC affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WLYH, the local CW affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WHP, the local CBS affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WHTM, the local ABC affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WITF, the local PBS affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WPMT, the local FOX affiliate serving the Lancaster, York, and Harrisburg area.
  • WLAN-FM, the local Radio Station serving the lower Susquehanna Valley.
  • WLAN-AM, the local Radio Station serving the Lancaster, area on the AM Dial.
  • WFNM-FM, the student-run radio station of Franklin & Marshall.

Sites of interest

Local Businesses

Preceded by
Philadelphia
Capital of the United States of America
1777
Succeeded by
York

References

1. ^ Lancaster (city) QuickFacts. Census Bureau. Retrieved on June 30, 2006.
2. ^ Lancaster County History. PHMC. Retrieved on Aug 1, 2006.
3. ^ Lancaster Turnpike. PHMC. Retrieved on May 26, 2006.
4. ^ Lewis & Clark Timeline. NPS. Retrieved on October 12, 2006.
5. ^ OperaHouse. FultonFoundation. Retrieved on Aug 1, 2006.
6. ^ Caramel. Scriptophily. Retrieved on Aug 1, 2006.
7. ^ Woolworth. WoolworthWalk. Retrieved on Aug 1, 2006.
8. ^ The History of Christmas. Gareth Marples. Retrieved on Dec 2, 2006.
9. ^ Puerto Rican Festival. Lancaster Online. Retrieved on September 18, 2006.
10. ^ Workforce Profile for Lancaster City. Jobs 4 Lancaster. Retrieved on May 9, 2006.
11. ^ Barnstormers' Pitching Coach. Lancaster Barnstormers. Retrieved on May 26, 2006.

Further reading

External links

The W.W. Griest Building, also known as the PP&L Building, is a historic skyscraper located in the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Built in 1925 by C. Emlen Urban, the W.W. Griest Building is also the tallest building in the city of Lancaster.
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Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, known as the Garden Spot of America since the 18th century, is located in the southeastern part of the state of Pennsylvania, in the United States.
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Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

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Nickname(s): Keystone State, Quaker State,
Coal State, Oil State

Motto(s): Virtue, Liberty and Independence

Capital Harrisburg
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Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Flag of Pennsylvania Seal
Nickname(s): Keystone State, Quaker State,
Coal State, Oil State

Motto(s): Virtue, Liberty and Independence

Capital Harrisburg
Largest city
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The following is a list of the sixty-seven counties of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States of America. The city of Philadelphia is coterminous with Philadelphia County, and governmental functions have been consolidated since 1854.
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Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, known as the Garden Spot of America since the 18th century, is located in the southeastern part of the state of Pennsylvania, in the United States.
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South Central Pennsylvania is a region of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania that includes the fourteen counties of Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Mifflin, Northumberland, Perry, Schuylkill, Snyder, and York.
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