List of battery sizes

Enlarge picture
4.5-Volt, D, C, AA, AAA, 9-Volt, SR41/AG3, SR44/AG13
(NOTE: The tape measure is Centimetres)
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This article refers to common battery types and sizes in household and light industrial use.


Battery size generally refers to the shape, voltage, and terminal layout of a battery. Thus the term "size" has become interchangeable with "type". Batteries of different types will usually not have the same dimensions and terminal layout.

Battery chemistry

New battery chemistries have strained the original common naming conventions. In all old batteries the voltages were in increments of 1.5 volts, which reflected the number of individual cells in the battery. Newer chemistries such as rechargeable NiCd and NiMH typically output 1.25 volts per cell. Some devices may not run properly on rechargeable batteries, but most handle them reasonably well. Other devices have exceptionally high drain rates and require a lithium type battery to run properly. Many new battery sizes refer to both the batteries' size and chemistry, while older names do not. For a more complete list see battery types. This summary is only for types relating to battery "sizes".

Battery chemistry primary

(charge density order)
Chemistry Cell
Voltage
Comments
Zinc-carbon1.5Inexpensive
Zinc-chloride1.5Inexpensive
alkaline
(zinc-manganese dioxide)
1.5Moderate energy density
Good for high and low drain uses
Lithium
(lithium-copper oxide)
Li-CuO
1.5End of life
SR battery is used instead now
Lithium
(lithium-iron disulfide)
LiFeS2
1.5Expensive
Used in 'plus' or 'extra' batteries
Lithium
(lithium-manganese dioxide)
LiMnO2
3.0Expensive
Only used in high-drain devices or for long shelf life due to very low rate of self discharge. 'Lithium' alone usually refers to this type of chemistry.
Mercury oxide1.35High drain and constant voltage
Banned in most countries because of health concerns
Zinc-air1.35-1.65Mostly used in hearing aids
Silver oxide (silver-zinc)1.55Very expensive
Only used commercially in 'button' cells

Battery chemistry rechargeable

(charge density order)
Chemistry Cell
voltage
Comments
NiCd1.2Inexpensive.
High/low drain, moderate energy density.
Moderate rate of self discharge.
Suffers from memory effect (which sometimes causes early failure)
NiMH1.2Expensive, high drain devices.
Traditional chemistry has high energy density, but also a high rate of self-discharge.
Newer chemistry has low self-discharge rate, but also a ~25% lower energy density.
Lithium ion3.6Very expensive.
Very high energy density.
Not usually used in 'common' battery sizes.
Very common in laptop computers, moderate to high-end digital cameras and camcorders, and cellphones.
Very low rate of self discharge.
Loses 5%-10% of its storage capacity every year from the time of manufacture whether it's used or not.
Volatile: Chance of explosion if short circuited, allowed to overheat, or not manufactured with rigorous quality standards.

Brand models

Even more confusing is that many manufacturers assign their own names and numbers to their batteries in disregard of common, colloquial, IEC, and ANSI naming conventions (See LR44 battery as an example). Many times this is to steer customers towards their brand and away from competitors by obfuscating the common name for a battery. For instance, if your TV remote needs a new battery and inside the battery compartment it says, "Replace with CX472 type battery", many customers will get that specific type, which is a product model for a common battery from a specific company, not knowing that many other companies also make that exact same battery. In this article brand models have been purposefully omitted to avoid confusion.

On the other hand, with obscure batteries, a specific brand model will sometimes become the most common name for a battery 'size' with most other manufacturers copying that name or deriving a new name from it.

Table of modern battery sizes

The following table is a list of battery sizes which are currently available in modern society. Note that there were other sizes other than those listed in this table which are no longer available due to either a decline in popularity or changing technological needs. Batteries for obsolete portable vacuum tubes devices for example, are not listed. A table of older, obsolete, and uncommon-availability batteries types and sizes can be found below this table.

Most
Common
Name
Other
Common
Names
IEC
Name
ANSI/NEDA
Name
Typical Capacity
(mAh)
Nominal Voltage (V) Shape Terminal layout Dimensions Comments
123Camera Battery
CR123
CR17354 (Lithium)5018LC (Lithium)1500 (Lithium)
700 (Li-Ion)
3Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 34.5 mm
D 17 mm
123 always implies lithium chemistry
4.5 VoltBardic Lamp Battery
Pocketable Battery
1203
4.5 V 
3LR12 (alkaline)
3R12 (carbon-zinc)
MN1203 (manganese)6100 (alkaline)
1200 (carbon-zinc)
4.5 Flat pack+ short terminal strip
- long terminal strip
H 65 mm
L 61 mm
W 21 mm
This battery is more common in Europe than North America.
9 VoltPP3
9-Volt
Radio battery
MN1604
6LR61 (alkaline)
6F22 (carbon-zinc)
6KR61 (NiCd)
1604A (alkaline)
1604D (carbon-zinc)
1604LC (Lithium)
11604 (NiCd)
7.2H5 (NiMH)
565 (alkaline)
400 (carbon-zinc)
1200 (lithium)
120 (NiCd)
175 (NiMH)
500 (Lithium polymer rechrg)
9
7.2 (NiCd)
7.2 (NiMH)
8.4 (some NiCd and NiMH)
Rectangularboth small end
+ male clasp
- female clasp
H 48.5 mm
L 26.5 mm
W 17.5 mm
Many (not all) 9 V batteries are an array of 6 reversed-polarity (nub is negative while can is positive) AAAA cells welded together internally
A2323A
3LR50
MN21
3LR50 (alkaline)1181A (alkaline)40 (alkaline)12Cylinder
(or button stack)
+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 29 mm
D 10 mm
Used in small RF devices such as key fob-style garage door openers and keyless entry systems where only infrequent pulse current is used. Sometimes enclosed like a normal battery but sometimes a stack of 8 LR932 button cells shrink wrapped together. (see here about naming)
AAPenlight
Mignon
MN1500
MX1500
LR6 (alkaline)
R6 (carbon-zinc)
FR6 (Lithium-FeS2)
KR157/51 (NiCd)
15A (alkaline)
15D (carbon-zinc)
15LF (Lithium-FeS2)
10015 (NiCd)
1.2H2 (NiMH)
2700 (alkaline)
1100 (carbon-zinc)
3000 (Lithium-FeS2)
600-1000 (NiCd)
1700-2900 (NiMH)
1.5
1.2 (NiCd)
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 50.5 mm
D 13.5-14.5 mm
C7/HP7;
AAAMicrolight
Potlood
MN2400
MX2400
LR03 (alkaline)
R03 (carbon-zinc)
FR03 (Li-FeS2)
24A (alkaline)
24D (carbon-zinc)
24LF (Li-FeS2)
1200 (alkaline)
540 (carbon-zinc)
800-1000 (Ni-MH)
1.5
1.2 (NiCd)
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 44.5 mm
D 10.5 mm
C16/HP16;
AAAAMX2500LR8D425 (alkaline)25A (alkaline)625 (alkaline)1.5Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 42.5 mm
D 8.3 mm
Obscure type sometimes used in 'pen flashlights' or electronic glucose meters. Most common use is as an internal component of 9v batteries.
CMignon
MN1400
MX1400
LR14 (alkaline)
R14 (carbon-zinc)
14A (alkaline)
14D (carbon-zinc)
8000 (alkaline)
3800 (carbon-zinc)
4500-6000 (NiMH)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 50 mm
D 26.2 mm
C11/SP11/HP11; Can be replaced with alkaline AA cell using plastic sabot (stub case)
See naming notes below about CR battery types
CR927   30 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 9.5 mm
H 2.7 mm
This obscure type of lithium coin cell is used extensively in blinkies.
CR1220 CR1220 (Lithium) 40 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 12.5 mm
H 2.0 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.1 mA.
CR1225 CR1225 (Lithium) 50 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 12.5 mm
H 2.5 mm
Standart discharge current: 0.2 mA. Maximum discharge current: 1 mA. Maximum pulse discharge current: 5 mA.
CR1616CR1616 (Lithium)50 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 16 mm
H 1.6 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.1 mA.
CR1620 CR1620 (Lithium) 78 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 16 mm
H 2.0 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.1 mA.
CR2016DL2016 CR2016 (Lithium)5000LC (Lithium)90 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 20 mm
H 1.6 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.1 mA. Often used in pairs instead of CR2032 for devices that require more than 3 volts, like blue/white LED flashlights. CAUTION: Using 2 CR2016 when not specified can damage a device.
CR2025DL2025 CR2025 (Lithium)5003LC (Lithium)160 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 20 mm
H 2.5 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.2 mA.
CR2032DL2032 CR2032 (Lithium)5004LC (Lithium)225 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 20 mm
H 3.2 mm
Standard Discharge Current: 0.2 mA. Maximum discharge current: 3 mA. Maximum pulse discharge current: 15 mA. Common battery in computers to keep the date and CMOS settings current when power is off.
CR2450DL2450 CR2450 (Lithium)5029LC (Lithium)610 (Lithium)3Coin+ bottom/sides
- top
D 24.5 mm
H 5.0 mm
Portable devices requiring high current (30 mA) and long shelf life (up to 10 years)
DGoliath
U2 (In Britain until the 1970s)
Flashlight Battery
MN1300
MX1300
LR20 (alkaline)
R20 (carbon-zinc)
13A (alkaline)
13D (carbon-zinc)
19500 (alkaline)
8000 (carbon-zinc)
9000-11500 (NiMH)
1.5
1.2 (NiMH)
Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 61.5 mm
D 34.2 mm
C2/SP2/HP2; Can be replaced with alkaline AA cell using plastic sabot (stub case)
Duplex2R103Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
H 74.6 mm
D 21.8 mm
Internally contains two 1.5 V cells hence the nickname 'Duplex'
J7K67 4LR61 (alkaline)1412A (alkaline)625 (alkaline)6Square with
missing corner
Flat contacts
- top side
+ missing corner
H 48.5 mm
L 35.6 mm
W 9.18 mm
Typically used in applications where the device in question needs to be flat, or where the battery should be unable to be put in reverse polarity--such as a blood glucose meter or blood pressure cuff. Also good for elderly persons, due to the large size.
Lantern (Spring)Lantern
6 Volt
Spring Top
MN908
4R25Y (alkaline)
4R25 (carbon-zinc)
908A (alkaline)
908D (carbon-zinc)
26000 (alkaline)
10500 (carbon-zinc)
6SquareSprings Top
+ Corner
- Center
H 115 mm
L 68.2 mm
W 68.2 mm
Springs are usually made so that leads for screw top can be fastened to them. In most applications this is fine (see next).
Lantern (Screw)Lantern
6 Volt
Screw Top
4R25Y (alkaline)
4R25 (carbon-zinc)
915A (alkaline)
908 (carbon-zinc)
26000 (alkaline)
10500 (carbon-zinc)
6SquareScrew Posts Top
+ Corner
- Center
H 115 mm
L 68.2 mm
W 68.2 mm
For uses that have high vibration/shock where the leads may be knocked off springs.
Lantern (Big)918
R25-2
Big Lantern
Double Lantern
MN918
4LR25-24 (alkaline)
4R25-2 (carbon-zinc)
8R25 (carbon-zinc)
918A (alkaline)
918D (carbon-zinc)
52000 (alkaline)
22000 (carbon-zinc)
6SquareScrew posts
Apart top
H 127 mm
L 136.5 mm
W 73 mm
 
NLady
MN9100
LR1 (alkaline)910A (alkaline)1000 (alkaline)1.5Cylinder+ Nub cylinder end
- Flat opposite end
L 30.2 mm
D 12 mm
Typical uses include remote-control door chimes, and other low current drain devices. Also used for wireless microphones, "Mr. Microphone" type devices, and some laser pointers.
Button types. See Naming Notes below about SR/LR/AG battery types
SR41AG3
LR41
D384/392
LR41 (alkaline)
SR41 (silver-oxide)
1135SO (silver-oxide)
1134SO (silver-oxide)
32 (alkaline)
42 (silver-oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver-oxide)
Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 7.9 mm
H 3.6 mm
 
SR43AG12
LR43
D301/386
LR43 (alkaline)
SR43 (silver-oxide)
1133SO (silver-oxide)
1132SO (silver-oxide)
80 (alkaline)
120 (silver-oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver-oxide)
Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 11.6 mm
H 4.2 mm
 
SR44AG13
LR44
D303/357
LR44 (alkaline)
SR44 (silver-oxide)
1166A (alkaline)
1107SO (silver-oxide)
1131SOP (silver-oxide)
150 (alkaline)
200 (silver-oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver-oxide)
Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 11.6 mm
H 5.4 mm
 
SR48AG5
D309/393
SR48 (silver-oxide)1136SO (silver-oxide)
1137SO (silver-oxide)
70 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 7.9 mm
H 5.4 mm
 
SR54AG10
LR54
D389/390
LR54 (alkaline)
SR54 (silver-oxide)
1138SO (silver-oxide)100 (alkaline)
70 (silver-oxide)
1.50 (alkaline)
1.55 (silver-oxide)
Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 11.6 mm
H 3.1 mm
 
SR55D381/391SR55 (silver-oxide)1160SO (silver-oxide)40 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 11.6 mm
H 2.1 mm
 
SR57SR927W
AG7
D395/399
LR57 (alkaline)
SR57 (silver-oxide)
116550 (silver-oxide)55 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 9.4 mm
H 2.8 mm
 
SR58D361/362SR58 (silver-oxide)1158SO (silver-oxide)24 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 7.9 mm
H 2.1 mm
 
SR59D396/397SR59 (silver-oxide)1163SO (silver-oxide)30 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 7.9 mm
H 2.6 mm
 
SR60AG1
D364
SR60 (silver-oxide)1175SO (silver-oxide)20 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 6.8 mm
H 2.15 mm
 
SR66AG4
D377
SR66 (silver-oxide)1176SO (silver-oxide)26 (silver-oxide)1.55 (silver-oxide)Button+ bottom/sides
- top
D 6.8 mm
H 2.6 mm
  | valign="top"

Naming notes

  • SR# / LR# / AG# Button Cells: IEC SR series batteries are silver oxide chemistry and provide 1.55 volts, while IEC LR series batteries are alkaline chemistry and provide 1.5 volts. Since there are no 'common' names beyond the AG# designation, many places use these three terms interchangeably, and they will all fit and work. The only difference is that the SR series typically have 50% greater capacity than the LR series. In low-drain devices like watches (without lights) this isn't very important, but in high-drain devices like blinkies, key chain flashlights, or laser pointers the SR type is preferred. Typically SR and LR will be the same price unless one buys in wholesale volume so there is no reason not to get the SR version. Often the free 'demo' batteries that come with a device are the LR version.
  • IEC CR# series: Denotes lithium-manganese dioxide chemistry. Since LiMnO2 cells produce 3 volts there are usually no alternate chemistries for a CR# coin battery. Conversely one LiMnO2 cell can replace two alternate chemistry cells, in a 3, 6, 9, or 12 volt battery. CR cell numbers correlate with the cell dimensions, being the diameter in millimetres (except for the extra half millimetre in some cases) followed by the height in tenths of a millimetre.
  • Button / Coin / Miniature: In many places these are used interchangeably.

Table of historical battery sizes



These battery types and sizes are generally no longer available or are difficult to obtain, and were used in the early developing years of the science of electricity, and the early years of electronics when vacuum tubes were used in portable devices.

Most
Common
Name
Other
Common
Names
Typical Battery Composition Nominal Voltage Shape Terminal layout Comments
A BatteryFilament batteryCarbon-zinc and lead-acidVaries from 6-12 volts Typically 2.5" x 2.5" x 5"large clasp connectors spaced inches apartThe first battery to use a letter designation, this large-capacity cell provided power to heat vacuum tubes in the first portable electronic devices. No longer in production due to replacement of vacuum tubes with low-power transistors.
B BatteryPlate batteryCarbon-zincVaries from 30 to 100 volts Typically 2.5" x 1" x 5" to fit alongside an A batterytwo or more large clasp connectors spaced inches apartThe second battery to use letter designations, this provided plate voltage to operate vacuum tubes in the first portable electronic devices. No longer in production due to replacement of vacuum tubes with low-power transistors.
C BatteryGrid batteryCarbon-zincTypically 1.5 volts Variestwo or more large twist-knob or banana-plug connectors spaced inches apartThe third battery to use letter designations, this provided grid voltage to operate vacuum tubes in the first portable electronic devices. No longer in production due to replacement of vacuum tubes with low-power transistors. | valign="top"

See also

References

  • IEC 60086-1: Primary batteries - Part 1: General
  • IEC 60086-2: Primary batteries - Part 2: Physical and electrical specifications
  • IEC 60086-3: Primary batteries - Part 3: Watch batteries
  • IEC 60086-4: Primary batteries - Part 4: Safety of lithium batteries
  • ANSI C18.1, Part 1 Portable Primary Cells and Batteries With Aqueous Electrolyte - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.1, Part 2 Portable Primary Cells and Batteries With Aqueous
Electrolyte ? Safety Standard
  • ANSI C18.2, Part 1 Portable Rechargeable Cells and Batteries - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.2, Part 2 Portable Rechargeable Cells and Batteries ? Safety
Standard
  • ANSI C18.3, Part 1 Portable Lithium Primary Cells and Batteries - General and Specifications
  • ANSI C18.3, Part 2 Portable Lithium Primary Cells and Batteries ? Safety Standard

External links

battery is a device that stores chemical energy and makes it available in an electrical form. Batteries consist of electrochemical devices such as one or more galvanic cells, fuel cells or flow cells.
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battery is a device consisting of one or more electrochemical cells, which store chemical energy and make it available in an electrical form. There are many types of electrochemical cells, including galvanic cells, electrolytic cells, fuel cells, flow cells, and voltaic cells.
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nickel-cadmium battery (commonly abbreviated NiCd and pronounced "nye-cad") is a popular type of rechargeable battery using nickel(IV) oxide and metallic cadmium as electrodes.
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NIMH or NiMH may refer to:
  • National Institute of Mental Health, a part of the United States National Institutes of Health.
  • National Institute of Medical Herbalists, a British organisation of professional medical herbalists dating back to 1864.

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A Zinc-carbon dry cell or battery is packaged in a zinc can that serves as both a container and anode. It was developed from the wet Leclanché cell (IPA pronunciation: [lɛklɑːnˈʃei]).
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Alkaline batteries are a type of power cell dependent upon the reaction between zinc and manganese dioxide (Zn/MnO2).

Compared with original
zinc-carbon batteries, while both produce approximately 1.
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Lithium batteries are primary batteries that have lithium metal or lithium compounds as an anode. Depending on the design and chemical compounds used lithium cells can produce voltages from 1.5V to about 3V, twice the voltage of an ordinary zinc-carbon battery or alkaline cell.
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Lithium batteries are primary batteries that have lithium metal or lithium compounds as an anode. Depending on the design and chemical compounds used lithium cells can produce voltages from 1.5V to about 3V, twice the voltage of an ordinary zinc-carbon battery or alkaline cell.
..... Click the link for more information.
Lithium batteries are primary batteries that have lithium metal or lithium compounds as an anode. Depending on the design and chemical compounds used lithium cells can produce voltages from 1.5V to about 3V, twice the voltage of an ordinary zinc-carbon battery or alkaline cell.
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A mercury battery (also called mercuric oxide battery, or mercury cell) is a non-rechargeable electrochemical battery, a primary cell. Due to the content of mercury, and the resulting environmental concerns, the sale of mercury batteries is banned in many countries.
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Zinc-air batteries, also called “zinc-air fuel cells,“ are non-rechargeable electro-chemical batteries powered by the oxidation of zinc with oxygen from the air. These batteries have very high energy densities and are relatively inexpensive to produce.
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silver-oxide battery (IEC code: S), also known as a silver-zinc battery, is a primary cell (although it may be used as a secondary cell with an open circuit potential of 1.86 volts).
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nickel-cadmium battery (commonly abbreviated NiCd and pronounced "nye-cad") is a popular type of rechargeable battery using nickel(IV) oxide and metallic cadmium as electrodes.
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Memory effect, also known as lazy battery effect, is an effect observed in some rechargeable batteries that causes them to hold less charge. In its original meaning it describes one very specific situation in which certain NiCd batteries gradually lose their maximum energy
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nickel-metal hydride battery, abbreviated NiMH, is a type of rechargeable battery similar to a nickel-cadmium (NiCd) battery but has a hydrogen-absorbing alloy for the anode instead of cadmium. As in NiCd batteries, nickel is the cathode.
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2.8-5 Wh/US$[2]
Self-discharge rate 5%-10%/month
Time durability (24-36) months
Cycle durability 1200 cycles
Nominal Cell Voltage 3.6 / 3.7 V
Charge temperature interval

Lithium-ion batteries (sometimes abbreviated Li-ion batteries
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LR44 is the IEC name for a standard type of 1.5 volt button cell alkaline battery, commonly used in laser pointers and watches.

The silver-oxide battery variant SR44
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The International Electrotechnical Commission[1] (IEC) is a not-for-profit, non-governmental international standards organization that prepares and publishes International Standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies – collectively known
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American National Standards Institute or ANSI (IPA pronunciation: [ænsiː]) is a private nonprofit organization that oversees the development of voluntary consensus standards for products, services, processes,
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The acronym NEDA has multiple meanings, including:
  • National Eating Disorders Association
  • National Economic and Development Authority, a Philippine government agency.

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An ampere-hour (abbreviated as Ah or A-h) is a unit of electric charge. One ampere-hour is equal to 3600 coulombs (ampere-seconds), and is the amount of electric charge transferred by a steady current of one ampere for one hour.
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volt (symbol: V) is the SI derived unit of electric potential difference or electromotive force.[1][2] It is named in honor of the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827), who invented the voltaic pile, the first modern chemical battery.
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PP3 battery, commonly referred to simply as a nine-volt battery, is shaped as a rounded rectangular prism and has a nominal output of nine volts. Its nominal dimensions are 48 mm × 25 mm × 15 mm (ANSI standard 1604A).
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A23 battery (also known as 3LR50 or ANSI-1181A) is a dry cell-type battery mainly used in small electronic key fob devices, such as keyless vehicle entry systems, home security systems, and garage door openers.
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Radio frequency, or RF, is a frequency or rate of oscillation within the range of about 3 Hz and 300 GHz. This range corresponds to frequency of alternating current electrical signals used to produce and detect radio waves.
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A key fob is a decorative item many people often carry with their keys, on a ring or a chain, for ease of tactile identification, to provide a better grip, or to make a personal statement. Key fobs are often mistakenly called "key rings" or "key chains" in colloquial usage.
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A garage door opener is a motorized device that opens and closes garage doors. Most are controlled by switches on the garage wall, as well as by remote controls carried in the garage owner's cars.
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remote keyless system is a system designed to remotely permit or deny access to premises or automobiles. There are several RKE systems on the market, including but not limited to KeeLoq by Microchip, HITAG by Philips, and AVR411 by Atmel.
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AA battery (IPA pronunciation: [eɪ eɪ] or [ˈdʌbl̩ eɪ]) is a dry cell-type battery commonly used in portable electronic devices.
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AAA battery (pronounced "triple A") is 44.5 mm long and 10.5 mm in diameter, weighing around 11.5 grams. Output of alkaline batteries in this size is 1.5 volts, 900 to 1,155 mA·h (3240 to 4158 coulombs).
..... Click the link for more information.


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