Mopsus

This article is about Mopsus (or Mopsos, Μοψος) ) in Greek mythology, for the ancient city also so named, see Mopsuestia; there is also a spider genus named Mopsus.


In Greek mythology, Mopsus or Mopsos[1] was the name of two famous seers.

Mopsus, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo

Mopsus, a celebrated seer and diviner, was the son of Manto, daughter of the mythic seer Tiresias and Rhacius of Caria or of Apollo himself, the oracular god.

Walter Burkert (Burkert 1992:52) noted the Eastern connections of the name Mopsus, which appears in a Hittite report, as Muksus. He instanced an eighth-century bilingual inscription from Karatepe in Cilicia, which attested a king from the "house of Mopsos", given in hieroglyphic Luwian as Moxos and in Phoenician as Mopsos, in the form mps.

Mopsus— and perhaps a tradition of his heirs, like the Melampodidae, the Iamidae from Olympia or the Eumolpidae at Eleusis— officiated at the altars of Apollo at Klaros; and from his unerring wisdom and discernment gave rise to the proverb, "more certain than Mopsus". He distinguished himself at the siege of Thebes; but he was held in particular veneration at the court of Amphilochus, at Colophon in Ionia, on the coast of Asia Minor adjacent to Caria.

The twelfth-century Byzantine mythographer John Tzetzes[2] reports anecdotes of the prowess of Mopsus. Having been consulted, on one occasion, by Amphilochus, who wished to know what success would attend his arms in a war which he was going to undertake, he predicted the greatest calamities; but Calchas, who had been the soothsayer of the Greeks during the Trojan War, promised the greatest successes. Amphilochus followed the opinion of Calchas, but the prediction of Mopsus was fully verified. This had such an effect upon Calchas that he died soon after. His death is attributed by some to another mortification of the same nature. The two soothsayers, jealous of each other's fame, came to a trial of their skill in divination. Calchas first asked his antagonist how many figs a neighboring tree bore; ten thousand and one, replied Mopsus. The figs were gathered, and his answer was found to be true. Mopsus now, to try his adversary, asked him how many young ones a certain pregnant sow would bring forth, and at what time. Calchas confessed his inability to answer, whereupon Mopsus declared that she would be delivered on the morrow, and would bring forth ten young ones, of which only one would be a male. The morrow proved the veracity of his prediction, and Calchas died through the grief which his defeat produced.[3]Amphilochus subsequently having occasion to visit Argos, entrusted the sovereign power to Mopsus, to keep it for him during the space of a year. On his return, however, Mopsus refused to restore to him the kingdom, whereupon, having quarreled, they engaged and slew each other.[4]. According to another legend reported by Tzetzes, [5] he was slain by Hercules.

Mopsus was venerated as founder in several cities, among them Mopsuestia in Cilicia, the oracle at Klaros and at Mallos.

Mopsus, the Argonaut

Mopsus, son of Ampyx and a nymph (sometimes named as Chloris), born at Titaressa in Thessaly, was also a seer and augur. According to Pindar, Mopsus was the king of Thrace during an invasion of Amazons, and killed their Queen Myrine in single combat, defeating the invaders with the help of Sipylus, the Scythian.

He was one of two seers among the Argonauts (together with Idmon), and was said to have understood the language of birds, having learnt augury from Apollo. While fleeing across the Libyan desert from angry sisters of the slain Gorgon Medusa, Mopsus died from the bite of a viper that had grown from a drop of Medusa's blood. Medea was unable to save him, even by magical means. The argonauts buried him with a monument by the sea, and a temple was later erected on the site.[6]

Ovid (Metamorphoses VIII.316) places him also at the hunt of the Calydonian Boar, although the hunt occurred after the Argonauts' return.

Notes

1. ^ An etymology derived from Greek moskhos (calf) is unlikely, given the Luwian/Phoenician context of the earliest mention (see below).
2. ^ In his scholia on the poet Lycophron.
3. ^ John Tzetzes, Ad Lycophron, 427.)
4. ^ John Tzetzes
Ad Lycophron 440
5. ^
Ad Lycophron|'' 980
6. ^ Argonautica I, 65-68 and 1502-1536); also Ovid, Metamorphoses IV 618- 621; ' Hyginus, Fabulae 14, 128, 172.?; John Tzetzes, ''Ad Lycophron, 980.

References

  • Charles Anthon, A Classical Dictionary (1842).
  • Walter Burkert, 1992. The Orientalizing Revolution: Near Eastern Influence on Early Archaic Greece (Cambridge:Harvard University Press) p 52.
  • John Lempriere, 1850. Lemprière's Classical Dictionary. ("Mopsus," p.422). (London. Bracken Books) Reprint 1994. paperback. ISBN 1-85891-228-8
Mopsuestia (Greek Μόψουέστία, also transliterated as Mopsouhestia or Mompsuestia) or Mopsus or Mamistra
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Mopsus
Karsch, 1878

Species: M. mormon

Diversity
1 species
Binomial name
Mopsus mormon
Karsch, 1878

Synonyms


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Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.
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There are two figures in Greek mythology named Manto, one a daughter of Tiresias, the other a daughter of Heracles.

The name Manto derives from Ancient Greek Mantis, "seer, prophet" (

*men-
, "to think").
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Everes redirects here. For the butterfly genus, see Everes (genus).


In Greek mythology, Tiresias (also transliterated as Teiresias) was a blind prophet of Thebes, famous for being transformed into a woman for seven years.
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In Greek mythology, Rhacius was the son of Lebes, and the leader of the first Greeks to settle in Caria, and became King of Caria. His court was located at Colophon in Ionia. With his wife Manto, daughter of the seer Teiresias, he was the father of Mopsus, a renowned seer.
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Caria (Greek: Καρία) was a region of Anatolia situated south of Ionia and west of Phrygia and Lycia. The eponymous inhabitants were known as Carians, and came to Caria before the Greeks.
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In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (in Greek, ἈπόλλωνApóllōn or ἈπέλλωνApellōn), the ideal of the kouros
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Hittites were an ancient people from Kaneš who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URUḪattuša) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC.
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Karatepe, ("Black Tell") Osmaniye Province Turkey, in the Taurus Mountains, on the right bank of the Ceyhan Nehri, about 23 km from Kadirli, is an ancient city of Cilicia that controlled a passage from eastern Anatolia to the plain of north Syria.
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Cilicia (Greek: Κιλικία; Armenian: Կիլիկիա) was a commonly used name of the south coastal region of the Anatolian penninsula, now known as Çukurova, and a political entity in Roman times.
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Luwian}}}
Language codes
ISO 639-1: none
ISO 639-2:
ISO 639-3: hlu Hieroglyphic Luwian is a variant of the Luwian language, recorded in official and royal seals and a small number of monumental inscriptions.
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Phoenician was a language originally spoken in the coastal region then called Pūt in Ancient Egyptian, Canaan in Phoenician, Hebrew, and Aramaic, and Phoenicia in Greek and Latin.
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In Greek Mythology, Melampus, or Melampous (Greek: Μέλαμπος),[1] was a legendary soothsayer and healer originally of Pylos, who ruled at Argos; he was the introducer of the worship of Dionysus, according to Herodotus, who
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The Eumolpidae (Ευμολπιδαι) were one of the sacred Eleusinian families of priests that ran the Eleusinian Mysteries during the Hellenic era.
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Location

Coordinates Coordinates:
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 0 - 5 m (0 - 0 ft)
Government
Country:
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Clarus (Greek Klaros) in the territory of Colophon in the Ionian coast of Asia Minor was a much-revered, much-famed cult center described by Pausanias (vii. 3, 1).
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In Greek mythology, Amphilochus, or Amphílokhos, is the name of three men.

1. Amphilochus was the younger son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle and the brother of Alcmaeon.
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Colophon (Greek Κολοφών) was a city in the region of Lydia in antiquity dating from about the turn of the first millenium-BC.
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John (Johannes) Tzetzes, (c. 1110 – 1180) was a Byzantine poet and grammarian, known to have lived at Constantinople during the 12th century.

Tzetzes was Georgian on his mother's side (and self-consciously Georgian[1]).
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Calchas ("bronze-man") or Kalchas Thestórides ("son of Thestor"), a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, with a gift for interpreting the flight of birds that he received of Apollo: "as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp" (Iliad i, E.V.
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Trojan War was waged, according to Greek mythology, against the city of Troy by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.
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Mopsuestia (Greek Μόψουέστία, also transliterated as Mopsouhestia or Mompsuestia) or Mopsus or Mamistra
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Clarus (Greek Klaros) in the territory of Colophon in the Ionian coast of Asia Minor was a much-revered, much-famed cult center described by Pausanias (vii. 3, 1).
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Ampyx has several meanings; in hair care, an ampyx is a headband, often made of metal. In Greek mythology, there were a number of figures with the name Ampyx, Amycus or Ampycus (alt. "Ampykos").
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nymph is any member of a large class of female entities in human form, that is either bound to a particular location, or landform, or is part of the retinue of a god, such as Dionysus, Hermes, or Pan, or a goddess, generally Artemis.
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