Nyx (mythology)



Greek deities
series
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Primordial deities


In Greek mythology, Nyx (Νύξ, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. A shadowy figure, Night stood at or near the beginning of creation, and was the mother of personified gods such as Sleep and Death. Her appearances in mythology are sparse, but reveal her as a figure of exceptional power.

Role in myth and literature

Hesiod

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Nyx, goddess of the night (William-Adolphe Bouguereau - La Nuit (1883))


In Hesiod's Theogony, Night is born of Chaos; her offspring are many, and telling. With her brother Erebus, Night gives birth to Aether ("atmosphere") and Hemera ("day"). Later, on her own, Night gives birth to Momus "blame", Ponos "toil", Moros "fate", Thanatos "death", Hypnos "sleep", the Oneiroi "the tribe of dreams", the Hesperides, the Keres and Fates, Nemesis, Apate "deception", Philotes "friendship", Geras "age", and Eris "strife".

In his description of Tartarus, Hesiod says further that Hemera "day", who is now Night's sister rather than daughter, left Tartarus just as Nyx entered it; when Hemera returned, Nyx left. This mirrors the portrayal of Ratri "night" in the Rig-Veda, where she works in close cooperation but also tension with her sister Ushas "dawn".

Homer

In Book 14 of Homer's Iliad, there is a quote by Hypnos, the minor god of sleep, in which he reminds Hera of an old favor after she asks him to put Zeus to sleep. He had once before put Zeus to sleep at the bidding of Hera, allowing her to cause Heracles (who was returning by sea from Laomedon's Troy) great misfortune. Zeus was furious and would have smitten Hypnos into the sea if he had not fled to Nyx, his mother, in fear. Hypnos goes on to say that Zeus, fearing to anger Nyx, held his fury at bay, and in this way Hypnos escaped the wrath of Zeus.

Other Greek Texts

Night took on an even more important role in several fragmentary poems attributed to Orpheus. In them, Night, rather than Chaos, is the first principle. Night occupies a cave or adyton, in which she gives oracles. Kronos - who is chained within, asleep and drunk on honey - dreams and prophesies. Outside the cave, Adrastea clashes cymbals and beats upon her tympanon, moving the entire universe in an ecstatic dance to the rhythm of Nyx's chanting. Phanes - the strange, monstrous, hermaphrodite Orphic demiurge - was the child or father of Nyx.

Night is also the first principle in the opening chorus of Aristophanes's Birds, which may be Orphic in inspiration. Here she is also the mother of Eros. In other texts she may be the mother of Charon (with Erebus), and Phthonus "envy" (with Dionysus?).

The theme of Night's cave or house, beyond the ocean (as in Hesiod) or somewhere at the edge of the cosmos (as in later Orphism) may be echoed in the philosophical poem of Parmenides. The classical scholar Walter Burkert has speculated that the house of the goddess to which the philosopher is transported is the palace of Night; this hypothesis, however, must remain tentative.

Role in society

Cults of Nyx

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Nyx, as represented in the 10th-century Paris Psalter.
In Greece, Night is only rarely the focus of cults. According to Pausanias, she had an oracle on the acropolis at Megara (Paus. 1.40.1).

More often, Nyx lurks in the background of other cults. Thus there was a statue called Night in the temple of Artemis at Ephesus. The Spartans had a cult of Sleep and Death, conceived of as twins (Paus. 3.18.1) - no doubt with Night as their mother. Cult titles composed of compounds of nyx- are attested for several gods, most notably Dionysus Nyktelios "nocturnal" (Paus. 1.40.6) and Aphrodite Philopannyx "who loves the whole night" (Orphic Hymn 55). organization,

Modern homages

On June 21 2006, the International Astronomical Union renamed one of Pluto's recently discovered moons (S/2005 P 2) to Nix, in honor of Nyx. The name was spelled with an "i" instead of a "y", to avoid conflict with the asteroid 3908 Nyx.

Children of Nyx

References

See also

External links


NYX may refer to:
  • Nyx (mythology), in Greek mythology, Nyx was the primordial goddess of the night.
  • NYX (comic book), an American comic book miniseries by Marvel Comics.
  • NYSE Euronext, (NYSE:  NYX , Euronext: NYX ) (formerly NYSE Group, Inc.

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Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.
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Titans (Greek: Τιτάν Titan; plural: Τιτάνες Titanes
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Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον
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    The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. The philosopher Plato once remarked that the Greek people were like frogs sitting around a pond -- their many cities hugging close to the Mediterranean coastline from the Hellenic homeland to Asia Minor, Libya, Sicily and
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    Chthonic (from Greek χθόνιος-khthonios, of the earth, from khthōn, earth; pertaining to the Earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in relation to Greek religion.
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    MusE is a MIDI/Audio sequencer with recording and editing capabilities written by Werner Schweer. MusE aims to be a complete multitrack virtual studio for Linux: it currently has no support under other platforms, due to its reliance on JACK and ALSA.
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    Asclepius (Greek Ἀσκληπιός, transliterated Asklēpiós; Latin Aesculapius) is the demigod of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology.
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      The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. The many theogonies constructed by Greek poets each give a different account of which gods came first.
      • In Homer, Ocean and Tethys are the parents of all the gods.

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      Chaos or Khaos is the primordial state of existence from which the first gods appeared. In other words, it is the dark void of space. It is made from a mixture of what the Ancient Greeks considered the four elements: earth, air, water and fire.
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        Aether (also Æther, Greek: ᾿Αιθήρ), in Greek mythology, is one of the Protogenoi (first-born). He is the personification of the "upper sky," space, and heaven, and the elemental god of the "Bright, Glowing, Upper Air.
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        Gaia (pronounced /'geɪ.ə/ or /'gaɪ.
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        Uranus (IPA: /ˈjʊərənəs, jʊˈreɪnəs/) is the Latinized form of Ouranos (Οὐρανός
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          In Greek mythology Hemera was the personification of day and one of the Protogenoi or primordial deities. She is the goddess of the daytime and, according to Hesiod (Theogony, 115), the daughter of Erebos and Nyx (the goddess of night).
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            In Greek mythology, Chronos (Χρόνος in Greek) in pre-Socratic philosophical works is said to be the personification of time. He emerged from the primordial Chaos.
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            Personified concepts
            • Muses
            • Nemesis
            • Moirae
            • Cratos
            • Zelus
            • Nike
            • Metis
            • Charites
            • Oneiroi
            • Adrasteia
            • Horae
            • Bia
            • Eros
            • Apate
            • Themis
            • Eris
            • Thanatos
            • Hypnos
            In Greek mythology, Eros
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              In Greek mythology Erebus (Έρεβος Erebos, "Deep blackness/darkness or shadow " from Ancient Greek Ἔρεβος
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              Ophion ("serpent"), also called Ophioneus ruled the world with Eurynome before the two of them were cast down by Cronus and Rhea, according to some sources.

              Sources

              Pherecydes of Syros's Heptamychia is the first attested mention of Ophion.
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              Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). It is either a deep, gloomy place, a pit or abyss used as a dungeon of torment and suffering that resides within Hades or the entire underworld with Hades being the hellish
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              Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices.
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              goddess is a female deity. Many cultures have goddesses. Most often these goddesses are part of a polytheistic system that includes multiple deities. Pantheons in various cultures can include both goddesses and gods, and in some cases also intersex deities.
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              Personification, or anthropomorphism, is a figure of speech that gives inanimate objects human traits and qualities. These attributes may include sensations, emotions, desires, physical gestures, expressions, and powers of speech, among others.
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              God

              General approaches
              Agnosticism Atheism
              Deism Dystheism
              Henotheism Ignosticism
              Monism Monotheism
              Natural theology Nontheism
              Pandeism Panentheism
              Pantheism Polytheism
              Theism Theology
              Transtheism

              Specific conceptions
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              Personified concepts
              • Muses
              • Nemesis
              • Moirae
              • Cratos
              • Zelus
              • Nike
              • Metis
              • Charites
              • Oneiroi
              • Adrasteia
              • Horae
              • Bia
              • Eros
              • Apate
              • Themis
              • Eris
              • Thanatos
              • Hypnos
              In Greek mythology, Hypnos
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              Personified concepts
              • Muses
              • Nemesis
              • Moirae
              • Cratos
              • Zelus
              • Nike
              • Metis
              • Charites
              • Oneiroi
              • Adrasteia
              • Horae
              • Bia
              • Eros
              • Apate
              • Themis
              • Eris
              • Thanatos
              • Hypnos
              In Greek mythology, Thanatos
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              Hesiod (Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hesiodos) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC.
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              Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC.
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              Chaos or Khaos is the primordial state of existence from which the first gods appeared. In other words, it is the dark void of space. It is made from a mixture of what the Ancient Greeks considered the four elements: earth, air, water and fire.
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                In Greek mythology Erebus (Έρεβος Erebos, "Deep blackness/darkness or shadow " from Ancient Greek Ἔρεβος
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                  Aether (also Æther, Greek: ᾿Αιθήρ), in Greek mythology, is one of the Protogenoi (first-born). He is the personification of the "upper sky," space, and heaven, and the elemental god of the "Bright, Glowing, Upper Air.
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