Quintus Hortensius

For other meanings of Hortensius, see Hortensius (disambiguation).


Quintus Hortensius Hortalus (114 - 50 BC), was a Roman orator and advocate.

At the age of nineteen he made his first speech at the bar, and shortly afterwards successfully defended Nicomedes IV of Bithynia, one of Rome's dependants in the East, who had been deprived of his throne by his brother. From that time his reputation as an advocate was established. As the son-in-law of Quintus Lutatius Catulus Caesar (through marriage to Lutatia, daughter of Catulus and Servilia) he was attached to the aristocratic party, the "optimates". During Lucius Cornelius Sulla's dictatorship the courts of law were under the control of the Senate, the judges being themselves senators.

To this circumstance perhaps, as well as to his own merits, Hortensius may have been indebted for much of his success. Many of his clients were the governors of provinces which they were accused of having plundered. Such men were sure to find themselves brought before a friendly, not to say a corrupt, tribunal, and Hortensius, according to Marcus Tullius Cicero (Div. in Caecil. 7), was not ashamed to avail himself of this advantage. Having served during two campaigns (90-89) in the Social War, he became quaestor in 81, aedile in 75, praetor in 72, and consul in 69. In the year before his consulship he came into collision with Cicero in the case of Gaius Verres, and from that time his supremacy at the bar was lost.

After 63 Cicero was himself drawn towards the party to which Hortensius belonged. Consequently, in political cases, the two men were often engaged on the same side (e.g. in defence of Gaius Rabirius, Lucius Licinius Murena, Publius Cornelius Sulla, and Titus Annius Milo). After Pompey's return from the East in 61, Hortensius withdrew from public life and devoted himself to his profession. In 50, the year of his death, he successfully defended Appius Claudius Pulcher when accused of treason and corrupt practices by Publius Cornelius Dolabella, afterwards Cicero's son-in-law.

Hortensius's speeches are not extant. His oratory, according to Cicero, was of the Asiatic style, a florid rhetoric, better to hear than to read. He had a wonderfully tenacious memory (Cicero, Brutus, 88, 95), and could retain every single point in his opponent's argument. His action was highly artificial, and his manner of folding his toga was noted by tragic actors of the day (Macrobius, Sat. iii. 13. 4). He also possessed a fine musical voice, which he could skilfully command. The vast wealth he had accumulated he spent on splendid villas, parks, fish-ponds and costly entertainments. He was the first to introduce peacocks as a table delicacy at Rome. He was a great buyer of wine, pictures and works of art. He wrote a treatise on general questions of oratory, erotic poems (Ovid, Tristia, ii. 441), and an Annales, which gained him considerable reputation as an historian (Yell. Pat. ii. 16. 3).

His daughter Hortensia was also a successful orator. In 42 she spoke against the imposition of a special tax on wealthy Roman matrons with such success that part of it was remitted (Quint. Instit. i. 1. 6; Val. Max. viii. 3. 3).

In addition to Cicero (passim), see Dio Cassius xxxviii. 16, xxxix. 37; Pliny, Nat. Hist. ix. 8i, x. 23, xiv. 17, xxxv. 40; Varro, R.R. iii. 13. 17.

References


Preceded by
Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives and Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus
Consul of the Roman Republic
with Quintus Caecilius Metellus Creticus
69 BCE
Succeeded by
Lucius Caecilius Metellus and Quintus Marcius Rex
Hortensius can refer to:
  • Quintus Hortensius (dictator), dictator of Rome in 286 B.C.
  • Quintus Hortensius Hortalus (114-50 BC), Roman orator.
  • The Dutch astronomer Martin van den Hove (1605-1639), also known as Martinus Hortensius.

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2nd century BC - 1st century BC
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117 BC 116 BC 115 BC - 114 BC - 113 BC 112 BC 111 BC

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1st century BC - 1st century
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53 BC 52 BC 51 BC - 50 BC - 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC

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The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. This article however is about the latter.
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Orator is an originally Latin word for (public) speaker.

Word history

It is recorded in English since c.1374, meaning "one who pleads or argues for a cause," from Anglo-French oratour, from Old French orateur (14c.
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Nicomedes IV, known as Philopator, was the king of Bithynia, from c. 94 BC to 75/4 BC. He was the son and successor of Nicomedes III.

There is nothing known about Nicomedes birth or the years before he became king. However, his reign began at the death of his father.
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Comune di Roma

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Nickname: "The Eternal City"
Motto: "Senatus Populusque Romanus" (SPQR)   (Latin)
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Quintus Lutatius Catulus Caesar (Latin: Q·LVTATIVS·C·F·CATVLVS·CAESAR ) was a Roman general of the gens Lutatius and was a consul with Gaius Marius in 102 BC. His name was originally Sextus Julius Caesar, and he was Julius Caesar's father's first cousin.
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Servilia, the wife of Quintus Lutatius Catulus, consul of b.c. 102. Their daughter Lutatia married the orator Quintus Hortensius, for which reason Cicero calls Servilia Hortensius's "socrus" (Cic. Verr, ii. 8.).
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Optimates (singular optimas, The Best of Men, Italian: ottimati; also known as the boni, The Good Men) were the pro-aristocratic faction of the later Roman Republic.
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Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L•CORNELIVS•L•F•P•N•SVLLA•FELIX )[1] (ca. 138 BC–78 BC), usually known simply as Sulla, was a Roman general, consul and dictator.
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The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. Although the West Roman Empire ended in the 5th century (in 476), the Roman Senate continued to meet until the latter part of the 6th
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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Cicero around age 60, from an ancient marble bust
Born: January 3, 106 BC
Arpinum, Italy
Died: December 7, 43 BC
Formia, Italy
Occupation: Politician, lawyer, orator and philosopher
Nationality: Ancient Roman
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Quaestores were elected officials of the Roman Republic who supervised the treasury and financial affairs of the state, its armies and its officers. The office may date back to the time of the kings of Rome.
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Aedile (Latin Aedilis, from aedes, aedis "temple," "building") was an office of the Roman Republic. Based in Rome, the aediles were responsible for maintenance of public buildings and regulation of public festivals.
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Praetor was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army, either before it was mustered or more typically in the field, or an elected magistrate assigned duties that varied depending on the
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Consul (abbrev. cos.; Latin plural consules) was the highest elected office of the Roman Republic and an appointive office under the Empire. The title was also used in other city states, and revived in modern states, notably Republican France before the Napoleonic
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Gaius Verres (ca. 120–43 BC), was a Roman magistrate, notorious for his misgovernment of Sicily.

It is not known to what gens he belonged. At first, he supported Gaius Marius and the populares, but soon went over to the optimates.
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1st century BC - 1st century
90s BC  80s BC  70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC  40s BC  30s BC 
66 BC 65 BC 64 BC - 63 BC - 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC

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State leaders - Sovereign states
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Gaius Rabirius may be:
  • Gaius Rabirius (senator), and his nephew Gaius Rabirius Postumus
  • Gaius Rabirius (poet)
  • Rabirius (architect) to the Roman Emperor Domitian

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Lucius Licinius Murena, Roman consul, was the son of Lucius Licinius Murena.

At the end of the First Mithridatic War, he was left in Asia by Sulla in command of the two legions formerly controlled by Gaius Flavius Fimbria.
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Publius Cornelius Sulla (d. 45 BC) was a politician of the late Roman Republic. He was the nephew (there is dispute over the degree of relatedness) of Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix.
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Titus Annius Milo Papianus was a Roman political agitator, the son of Gaius Papius Celsus, but adopted by his maternal grandfather, Titus Annius Luscus. In 53 BC he murdered Publius Clodius Pulcher and was later defended by his friend Marcus Tullius Cicero in the Pro Milone
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Appius Claudius Pulcher was the name of several members of the Claudii during the Roman Republic:
  • Appius Claudius Pulcher, consul of 212 BC
  • Appius Claudius Pulcher, consul of 185 BC
  • Appius Claudius Pulcher, politician of the 2nd century BC and consul 143 BC

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Publius Cornelius Dolabella, born 70 BC, was a Roman general, by far the most important of the Dolabellae, a plebian family of the patrician Cornelii. He married Cicero's daughter Tullia Ciceronis.
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    Rhetoric (from Greek ῥήτωρ, rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric
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    Cicero's Brutus (full title: Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators or Brutus, or the History of Eloquence) is a history of Roman oratory.

    External links

    • Text at Gutenberg

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    TOGA is an acronym used in aviation, standing for Take Off/Go Around. It is used to refer to buttons, often mounted on the throttle quadrant, that allow the engines to quickly be brought to full power, either for take off or in the event of a go around.
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    Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius was a Roman grammarian and Neoplatonist philosopher who flourished during the reigns of Honorius and Arcadius (395–423).

    Life and Works


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    Pavo
    Linnaeus, 1758


    Species

    Pavo cristatus
    Pavo muticus

    The term peafowl can refer to the two species of bird in the genus Pavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae.
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