River Nene

The River Nene is a river in the east of England. It flows for 91 miles (147 km) through Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire. The tidal river forms the border between Cambridgeshire and Norfolk for about six kilometres.

The river's environment

The river rises at sources near Badby (the nearby village of Newnham appears to be named after it), Naseby and Yelvertoft, Northamptonshire, then it flows through arable land, before entering the modern industrial landscape of Northampton, Wellingborough and Irthlingborough to flow among its gravel pits. It flows past Nene Park, the home of Rushden and Diamonds. At grid reference TL116976, the Romans bridged the river with Ermine Street in the first century.

Having passed among the gentle hills of Northamptonshire it enters the rural part of the City of Peterborough, passing the Nene Valley Railway and through the Nene Valley Country Park. Half a mile upstream of the city centre is Woodston Wharf - the site of the old sea lock - originally the extent of the tidal River Nene until the Dog in a Doublet lock at Whittlesey was opened in 1937.

Continuing downstream will take you along the impressive 'Embankment' area and after the cathedral city itself, the landscape changes to the Nene Washes in The Fens and their vast, seemingly endless horizons. Beyond Flag Fen the river flows through Wisbech, then Sutton Bridge in Lincolnshire, and finally enters the North Sea at The Wash between two towers known as "the lighthouses"

The Nene links the Grand Union Canal to the River Great Ouse, via the Middle Level system. Much of its route has been upgraded to a wide canal with locks at regular intervals. Some sections where the "canal" runs adjacent to the "river" are known as the "Nene Navigation".

The name

Pronunciation of the river's name is a bone of contention in its locality, and changes as one moves downstream. Through Northamptonshire locals mostly refer to it as the [nɛn] (rhyming with "hen"), but around Peterborough it changes to [niːn] (rhyming with "mean"). The spelling was "Nen" or "Nyn" until the beginning of the 20th Century, and the point at which the pronunciation changes has been moving further inland for many years; the current edition of the Imray "Map Of The River Nene" suggests that the cut-off point is Thrapston.

Whatever the spelling and pronunciation, it is suggested that the name originates from the nine springs that once fed the head of the river.

The river gave its name to the former Nene College of Higher Education in Northampton, now University of Northampton.

The river also gave its name to the Rolls-Royce Nene turbojet engine, Rolls-Royce practice being to name their gas turbine designs after British rivers.

External Links

River Nene across Fens to The Wash

See also

river is a natural waterway that transits water through a landscape from higher to lower elevations. It is an integral component of the water cycle. The water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through surface runoff, groundwater recharge (as seen at baseflow
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Motto
Dieu et mon droit   (French)
"God and my right"
Anthem
No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is "God Save the Queen".
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Northamptonshire

Geography
Status Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan county
Region East Midlands
Area
- Total
- Admin. council Ranked 24th
 km ( sq mi)
Ranked 22nd
Admin HQ Northampton
GB-NTH
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    Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west.
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    Lincolnshire

    Geography
    Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
    Region East Midlands
    (North Lincolnshire and
    North East Lincolnshire are in
    Yorkshire and the Humber)
    Area
    - Total
    - Admin.
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    Tides are the cyclic rising and falling of Earth's ocean surface caused by the tidal forces of the Moon and the Sun acting on the oceans. More generally, tidal phenomena can occur in any object that is subjected to a gravitational field that varies in time and space, such as the
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    Norfolk (pronounced IPA: /ˈnɔːfək/) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England.
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    Badby is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England.

    Badby is a rural parish of some 2,400 acres (10 km²)
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    Newnham is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. The village is 2 miles south of Daventry, 3 miles West from Weedon, 6 miles west of junction 16 of the M1 Motorway and is 11 miles west of Northampton.
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    Naseby is a small village in the District of Daventry in the Northamptonshire county, England.

    The village is 14 miles north of Northampton, 13.
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    Yelvertoft is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England.

    Yelvertoft's main thoroughfare, called High Street, is approximately three quarters of a mile long, from the Parish Church of All Saints to the Village Hall.
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    arable land (from Latin arare, to plough) is an agricultural term, meaning land that can be used for growing crops.

    Of the earth's 148,000,000 km² (57 million square miles) of land, approximately 31,000,000 km² (12 million square miles) are arable;
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    Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. Northampton is situated 67 miles (108 km) north of London on the River Nene, and is the county town of Northamptonshire.
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    Wellingborough

    Wellingborough (United Kingdom)

    Wellingborough shown within the United Kingdom
    Population 46,959 (2001 Census)
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    Irthlingborough is a small town on the River Nene in Northamptonshire, England with a population of around 9,000 people. It is the smallest town in England to have possessed a league association football team, Rushden & Diamonds F.C..
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    Gravel is rock that is of a certain particle size range. In geology, gravel is any loose rock that is at least two millimeters (2mm) in its largest dimension (about 1/12 of an inch) and no more than 75 millimeters (about 3 inches).
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    Nene Park is the home ground of Rushden & Diamonds football club. Situated in Irthlingborough, Northamptonshire, England, along the bank of the River Nene, the stadium holds 6,441 with 4,641 seated and 1,800 standing.
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    Rushden & Diamonds Football club

    Full name Rushden & Diamonds
    Football Club
    Nickname(s) The Diamonds
    Founded 1992
    Ground Nene Park
    Irthlingborough

    Capacity 6,441
    Chairman
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    The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude.

    The Ordnance Survey (OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data,
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      Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between AD 43 and 410. The Romans referred to their province as Britannia.
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      bridge is a structure built to span a gorge, valley, road, railroad track, river, body of water, or any other physical obstacle. Designs of bridges will vary depending on the function of the bridge and the nature of the terrain where the bridge is to be constructed.
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      Ermine Street is the Anglo-Saxon name of a major Roman road in England that ran from London (Londinium) to Lincoln (Lindum Colonia) and York (Eboracum).
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      The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period
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      Peterborough /ˡpiːtəˌbʌɹə/ is a cathedral city and unitary authority in the East of England, with a projected population of 161,800 as of 2007.
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      Nene Valley Railway (NVR) is a preserved railway in Cambridgeshire, England, running between Peterborough Nene Valley and Yarwell Junction. The line is seven and a half miles in length.
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      Whittlesey (historically known as Whittlesea - the name of the railway station is still spelt this way - or Witesie) is an ancient Fenland market town around six miles (10 km) east of Peterborough in the county of Cambridgeshire in England.
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      cathedral is a Christian church that contains the seat of a bishop. It is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Orthodox and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishop's seat, and
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      The Nene Washes are a Special Protection Area along the River Nene in the English county of Cambridgeshire.

      They extend for around 21 km east of the City of Peterborough and covers more than 15 square kilometres.
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      The British Fens, also known as the Fenland
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      Flag Fen near Peterborough, England is a Bronze Age site, probably religious. It comprises a large number of poles arranged in five very long rows (around 1 km) connecting Whittlesey Island with Peterborough across the wet fenland.
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