Saint Spyridon

Saint Spyridon
The Thaumaturgist (Miracle-worker) (Ο Θαυματουργός)
Bornca. 270, Askia, Cyprus
Died348, Trimythous, Cyprus
Venerated inEastern Orthodoxy, Eastern Catholicism
Beatified?
Canonized?
Major shrineCorfu
FeastDecember 12 (East), December 14 (West)
AttributesEpiscopal insignia, potsherd, basil
Patronagepotters, Corfu
Prayer O most blessed hierarch Spyridon, thou great Saint of Christ and glorious wonder-worker! Standing in heaven before the throne of God with choirs of Angels, look down with a compassionate eye upon the people gathered here (N.___) and asking thy powerful help. Entreat the merciful kindness of God Who loveth mankind, that He judge us not according to our iniquities, but rather act towards us according to His mercy... [1]


Saint Spyridon (Greek Ἃγιος Σπυρίδων ca. 270348) is a saint honoured in both the Eastern and Western Christian traditions.

Spyridon was born in Askia in Cyprus. He worked as a shepherd and was known for his great piety. He married and had one daughter, Irene. Upon the death of his wife, Spyridon entered a monastery, and their daughter, a convent.

Spyridon eventually became the Bishop of Trimythous, near Paphos and a was a vocal opponent of Arianism. He reportedly converted a pagan philosopher to Christianity by using a potsherd to illustrate how one entity could be composed of three unique entities (fire, water and clay; a metaphor for the Christian Trinity). The shard is said to have miraculously begun streaming water and producing a small flame as soon as Spyridon finished speaking.

Spyridon took part in the Council of Nicaea (325), but fell into disfavor during the persecutions of the emperor Maximinus.

When the Arabs took Cyprus, Spyridon's body was disinterred for removal to Constantinople. The body was allegedly uncorrupted, and contained a sprig of basil, the "royal plant," — taken as a sign of his confirmation as a saint.

When, in 1453, Constantinople fell to the Turks, Spyridon's relics were removed again; this time, to the island of Corfu by a Corfiote monk called Kalohairetis (Καλοχαιρέτης), where they remain to this day. The relics are taken in procession every Palm Sunday and on other special occasions, for veneration by the faithful.

Spyridon is the patron saint of potters (from the purported miracle of the potsherd) and the island of Corfu where he is called: "Αγιος Σπυρίδων ο πολιούχος" translated as "Saint Spyridon the Keeper of the City" for the miracle of expelling the plague (πανώλη) from the island. It is believed by the faithful that the plague on its way out of the island scratched one of the fortification stones of the old citadel (Palaio Frourio) to indicate its fury for being expelled.

St. Spyridon is also believed to have saved the island at the second great siege of Corfu which took place in 1716. At that time the Turkish army and naval force led by the great Sultan Achmet III appeared in Butrinto opposite Corfu. On July 8 the Turkish fleet carrying 33,000 men sailed to Corfu from Butrinto and established a beachhead in Ipsos. The same day the Venetian fleet encountered the Turkish fleet off the channel of Corfu and defeated it in the ensuing naval battle. On July 19 the Turkish army reached the hills of the town and laid siege to the city. After repeated failed attempts and heavy fighting, the Turks were forced to raise the siege which had lasted 22 days. There were also rumours spreading among the Turks that some of their soldiers saw St Spyridon as a monk threatening them with a lit torch and that helped increase their panic. This victory over the Turks, therefore, was attributed not only to the leadership of Count Schulenburg who commanded the stubborn defence of the island against the Turks but also to the miraculous intervention of St. Spyridon. After the victorious outcome of the battle, Venice honoured Schulenburg and the Corfiotes for successfully defending the island.

Recognizing St. Spyridon's role in the defence of the island Venice legislated the establishment of the litany of St Spyridon on August 11 as a commemoration of the event. His feast is celebrated on December 12 in the East and December 14 in the West.

St. Spyridon is also the patron saint of the Tolstoy family. Andrei Tolstoy (fl. 15th century) chose St. Spyridon as the family's saint and he remains so in both branches to this day. The Grand Prince of Muscovy Basil II (1425-1462) apparently gave a gold cross with relics of the saint inside to Andrei. This survives and is held by the senior member of the Tolstoy family, now Count Nikolai Tolstoy.

External links

Spiridon could mean:
  • Saint Spiridon
  • Spiridon, a planet featured in the Doctor Who serial Planet of the Daleks
  • Spiridon Peninsula in Alaska.

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Motto
none
Anthem
Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν
Imnos is tin Eleftherian

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Motto
none
Anthem
Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν
Imnos is tin Eleftherian

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Eastern Christianity

History
Byzantine Empire
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By region
Eastern Orthodox history
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Traditions
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Eastern Christianity

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By region
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Traditions
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In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακάριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead person's accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who
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Canonization (also spelled Canonisation) is the act by which a Christian Church declares a deceased person to be a saint, inscribing that person in the canon, or list, of recognized saints.
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shrine, from the Latin scrinium (‘box’; also used as a desk, like the French bureau) is originally a container, usually in precious materials, especially for a relic and often a cult image, and/or a holy or sacred place , often containing the same,
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The calendar is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saint's feast day.
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December 12 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events


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December 14 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events

  • 1287 - St.

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patron saint of a particular group of people is a saint who has special affinity for that group and its members. Prayers by such people are considered more likely to be answered by their patron saint.
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Pottery is the ceramic ware made by potters. In everyday usage the term is taken to encompass a wide range of ceramics, including earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain. The places where such wares are made are called potteries.
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Greek}}} 
Writing system: Greek alphabet 
Official status
Official language of:  Greece
 Cyprus
 European Union
recognised as minority language in parts of:
 European Union
 Italy
 Turkey
Regulated by:
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3rd century - 4th century
240s  250s  260s  - 270s -  280s  290s  300s
267 268 269 - 270 - 271 272 273
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4th century · 5th century
310s 320s 330s 340s 350s 360s 370s
345 346 347 348 349 350 351
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saint is one who is sanctified (cf. 2 Chron. 6:41). The early Christians were all called saints. (Heb. 13:24; Jud. 1:3; Phile. 1:5, 7) Over time, the traditional usage of the term saint
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Eastern Christianity

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Christianity

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Motto
none
Anthem
Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν
Imnos is tin Eleftherian

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shepherd is one who takes care of sheep, usually in flocks in the fields.

History

Shepherding is one of the oldest professions, beginning some 6,000 years ago in Asia Minor. Sheep were kept for their milk, meat, and especially their wool.
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Monastery (plural: Monasteries), a term derived from the Greek word μοναστήριον (monastērion), denotes the building, or complex of buildings, that houses a room reserved for prayer (e.g.
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convent is a community of priests, religious brothers or religious sisters, or the building used by the community, particularly in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Anglican Communion.
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Paphos (Πάφος)

District Paphos
Government
 - Mayor Savvas Vergas
Population (2001 - 2005)
 - City 47.
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Foundations
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Paganism (from Latin paganus, meaning "an old country dweller, rustic") is a term which, from a Western perspective, has come to connote a broad set of spiritual or cultic practices or beliefs of any folk religion, and of historical and contemporary polytheistic religions
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Philosophy is the discipline concerned with questions of how one should live (ethics); what sorts of things exist and what are their essential natures (metaphysics); what counts as genuine knowledge (epistemology); and what are the correct principles of reasoning (logic).
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