Sakanoue no Tamuramaro

Enlarge picture
Sakanoue no Tamuramaro
Sakanoue no Tamuramaro (坂上田村麻呂 758 - 811) was a general and shogun of the early Heian Period of Japan. He was the son of Sakanoue no Karitamaro.

Serving Emperor Kammu, he was appointed shogun and given the task of conquering the Emishi (蝦夷征伐 Emishi Seibatsu), a people native to the north of Honshū, which he subjugated. Recent evidence suggests that a migration of Emishi from northern Honshū to Hokkaidō took place sometime between the seventh and eighth centuries, perhaps as a direct result of this policy that pre-dated Tamuramaro's appointment. However, many Emishi remained in the Tōhoku region as subjects of the expanding Japanese Empire, and later established independent Fushu domains. After Emperor Kammu's death, the general continued to serve Emperor Heizei and Emperor Saga as Major Counselor (大納言 dainagon) and Minister of War (兵部卿 Hyōbu-kyō)[1]

It is said that the famous Tanabata festivals and parades of Aomori prefecture (also celebrated in the city of Sendai in Miyagi prefecture), which draw over 3 million people to the prefecture a year, were popularized in remembrance of Sakanoue no Tamuramaro's camapign to subdue the tribal societies then living in Tohoku. These annual matsuri are called the Nebuta festival in Aomori City and Neputa festival (ねぷた祭り) in Hirosaki City. -- link to Aomori Nebuta-- link to Aomori prefecture matsuri

Tamuramaro's military successes are commemorated today in autumn matsuri which feature a number of gigantic, specially-contructed, illuminated paper floats. These huge festival structures are colorfully painted with mythical figures; and teams of men carry them through the streets as crowds shout encouragement. Aomori's great nebuta lanterns are said to hark back to Tamuramaro's innovative strategy in that early ninth century campaign. According to legend, the taishogun is remembered for having ordered huge illuminated lanterns to be placed at the top of hills; and when the curious Emishi approached these bright lights to investigate, they were captured and subdued.[2] Until the mid 1990s the prize awarded for the best float of the parades was called the Tamuramaro Prize. However, there is no historical record that he went farther north than Iwate prefecture.

Tamuramaro is credited with the building of Kiyomizu Temple (Kiyomizu-dera), one of the most famous landmarks to be seen in Kyoto.
  • Kōnin 2, in the 3rd month (811): Tamuramaro died at age 54, to the great regret of Emperor Saga, who expressed his sense of loss by distributing large quantities of silk cloth, cotton cloth and rice in honor of his dead counselor. His bow, arrows, quiver and sword were placed in his coffin by order of the Emperor.[3]
Tamuramaro is reputedly buried at Shōgun-zuka, and his spirit is said to be guarding Kyoto still; but even if part of that tale is only myth, the recorded final resting place of the old warrior was near the village of Kurusu (Kurusu-mura 栗栖村) in Yamashiro's Uji district.[4]

References

1. ^ Varley, H. Paul. (1980). Jinnō Shōtōki, p. 272.
2. ^ Boroff, Nicholas. National Geographic Traveler Japan, p. 156.
3. ^ Titsingh, p. 99.
4. ^ Titsingh, p. 99.
  • Bornoff, Nicholas. (2005). National Geographic Traveler Japan. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society. ISBN 0-7922-3894-X
  • Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). [Siyun-sai Rin-siyo/Hayashi Gahō (1652)], Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland.
  • Varley, H. Paul , ed. (1980). [Kitabatake Chikafusa (1359)], Jinnō Shōtōki ("A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns: Jinnō Shōtōki of Kitabatake Chikafusa" translated by H. Paul Varley). New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-04940-4

External links

  • Wikimap: Shogun-zuka

Further Reading

  • Kameda Takashi 亀田隆之 (1967). Sakanoue no Tamuramaro. Tokyo: Jinbutsu Oraisha 人物往来社.
7th century - 8th century - 9th century
720s  730s  740s  - 750s -  760s  770s  780s
755 756 757 - 758 - 759 760 761
..... Click the link for more information.
8th century - 9th century - 10th century
780s  790s  800s  - 810s -  820s  830s  840s
808 809 810 - 811 - 812 813 814
..... Click the link for more information.
Shōgun (将軍 shōgun
..... Click the link for more information.

..... Click the link for more information.
Editing of this page by unregistered or newly registered users is currently disabled due to vandalism.
If you are prevented from editing this page, and you wish to make a change, please discuss changes on the talk page, request unprotection, log in, or .
..... Click the link for more information.
Sakanoue no Karitamaro (坂上苅田麿) (728-786) was a samurai commander, and later Chinjufu-shōgun (Commander-in-chief of the defense of the North), during Japan's Nara period.
..... Click the link for more information.
Emperor Kanmu (桓武天皇 Kanmu-tennō
..... Click the link for more information.
Emishi (蝦夷, pre-7th century 毛人) was used by the Japanese to designate people who lived in northeastern Japan corresponding to the present-day Tohoku region, known in contemporary sources as michi no oku
..... Click the link for more information.
Editing of this page by unregistered or newly registered users is currently disabled due to vandalism.
If you are prevented from editing this page, and you wish to make a change, please discuss changes on the talk page, request unprotection, log in, or .
..... Click the link for more information.
Emperor Heizei (平城天皇 Heizei-tennō or Heijō-tennō) (774-824) was the 51st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 806 through 809.
..... Click the link for more information.
Emperor Saga (嵯峨天皇, Saga-tennō) (786–842) was the 52nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 809 through 823.
..... Click the link for more information.
Tanabata (七夕 tanabata)
..... Click the link for more information.
Aomori Prefecture (青森県 Aomori-ken )

Capital Aomori (city)
Region Tōhoku
Island Honshū
Governor Shingo Mimura
Area 9,606.
..... Click the link for more information.
Japanese festivals are traditional festive occasions. Some festivals have their roots in Chinese festivals but have undergone dramatic changes as they mixed with local customs.
..... Click the link for more information.


Aomori (青森市
..... Click the link for more information.


Hirosaki (Japanese: 弘前市; Hirosaki-shi) is a city located in Aomori Prefecture in the Tohoku region of Japan.
..... Click the link for more information.
Iwate Prefecture (岩手県 Iwate-ken)

Capital Morioka
Region Tohoku
Island Honshū
Governor Takuya Tasso
Area 15,278.
..... Click the link for more information.
Kiyomizu-dera (or Kiyomizudera; Japanese: 清水寺) refers to several Buddhist temples but most commonly to Otowa-san Kiyomizu-dera (
..... Click the link for more information.
Kyoto (京都市) listen  
..... Click the link for more information.
8th century - 9th century - 10th century
780s  790s  800s  - 810s -  820s  830s  840s
808 809 810 - 811 - 812 813 814
..... Click the link for more information.
Columbia University Press is an academic press based in New York City and affiliated with Columbia University. It is currently directed by James D. Jordan (2004-present) and publishes titles in the humanities and sciences, including the fields of literary and cultural studies,
..... Click the link for more information.


This article is copied from an article on Wikipedia.org - the free encyclopedia created and edited by online user community. The text was not checked or edited by anyone on our staff. Although the vast majority of the wikipedia encyclopedia articles provide accurate and timely information please do not assume the accuracy of any particular article. This article is distributed under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.