San Antonio Spurs

San Antonio Spurs
Enlarge picture
San Antonio Spurs logo
ConferenceWestern Conference
DivisionSouthwest Division
Founded1967
HistoryDallas Chaparrals
19671970, 19711973
Texas Chaparrals
1970–1971
San Antonio Spurs
1973–present
ArenaAT&T Center
CitySan Antonio, Texas
Team ColorsBlack, White, and Silver
OwnerPeter Holt
General ManagerR.C. Buford
Head CoachGregg Popovich
NBA D-League AffiliateAustin Toros
Championships4 (1999, 2003, 2005, 2007)
Conference Titles4 (1999, 2003, 2005, 2007)
Division Titles15 (1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1990, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006)


The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. They play in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and are the current NBA Champions after defeating the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2007 NBA Finals.

The Spurs are one of four former American Basketball Association teams (along with the Nets, Pacers, and Nuggets) to remain intact in the NBA after the 1977 merger and are the only former ABA team to have won an NBA championship, which they have done four times. As of November 2006, the Spurs rank second among active franchises for the highest winning percentage in NBA history (behind the Los Angeles Lakers). With the 2007 sweep, the Spurs have the highest winning percentage in NBA Finals history. They have only missed the playoffs 4 times as an NBA franchise.

In their 30 NBA seasons the Spurs have captured 15 division titles, which gives the Spurs the most division titles in the NBA during the 30-year span (the Lakers are second with 14), among the four major sports the Atlanta Braves are the only other team with 15 divisional titles during the last 30 years.

The Spurs in San Antonio

The Spurs are located in the San Antonio area, and the city shares a special bond with the team almost unmatched in the rest of the NBA, partially due to this being the city's only team in any of the four major U.S. professional sports. Spurs players are active members of the San Antonio community, and many former Spurs are still active in San Antonio, like David Robinson's Carver Academy and the George Gervin Youth Center.

In part because of this community involvement, Spurs fans have been among the most loyal in the NBA. The Spurs set several NBA attendance records while playing at the Alamodome, including the largest crowd ever for a NBA Finals game in 1999, and the Spurs continue to sell out the smaller, more intimate AT&T Center (formerly SBC Center) on a regular basis. The Spurs' rallying cry of "Go Spurs Go!" has endeared itself to the city of San Antonio, and the phrase pops up all over the city as the season progresses into the playoffs and the Spurs inch closer to a possible title.

San Antonio has also garnered praise for the way its citizens celebrate Spurs championships. When the Spurs win a title, San Antonians jam up the streets downtown, march around waving flags, throw confetti and honk car horns until dawn, but with little incidence of crime.[1] The team floats down the San Antonio Riverwalk on boats where fans can view their world champions.

A unique part of every Spurs season comes in February when the team is forced into an extended road-trip due to the occupation of its arena by the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo. This is informally known as the "Rodeo Road Trip," and a time that typically starts the Spurs' run to the playoffs; indeed, starting in 1999 the Spurs have consistently posted phenomenal road records during this period, including an NBA-record the longest single road trip winning streak (8 games, achieved in 2003).

Team history

The ABA years: Dallas Chaparrals (1967-1973)

The San Antonio Spurs started out as the Dallas Chaparrals of the original version of the American Basketball Association (ABA) in 1967. Led by Player/Coach Cliff Hagan the Dallas Chaparrals were one of 11 teams to take the floor in the inaugural season of the upstart ABA. The Chaps second season was a bit of a disappointment, as the team finished in 4th place with a mediocre 41-37 record. In the playoffs the Chaparrals quickly fell to the New Orleans Buccaneers. The team suffered from poor attendance and general disinterest in Dallas. In fact, during the 1970-71 season, the name "Dallas" was dropped in favor of "Texas" and an attempt was made to make the team a regional one, playing games in Fort Worth, Texas, at the Tarrant County Coliseum, as well as Lubbock, Texas, at the Lubbock Municipal Coliseum, but this proved a failure and the team returned full-time to Dallas in time for the 1971-72 season, splitting their games at Moody Coliseum and Dallas Convention Center Arena.[2]

The ABA years: Coming to San Antonio (1973-1976)

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San Antonio Spurs logo from 1973-1989
After missing the playoffs for the first time in their existence in the 1972-73 season, the team was put up for sale. The team was acquired by a group of 36 San Antonio businessmen, led by Angelo Drossos and Red McCombs who actually leased the team from the original Dallas ownership group, relocated the team to San Antonio, Texas and renamed them the Gunslingers. However, before they even played a game the name was changed to Spurs. The team's primary colors were changed from the red, white, and blue of the Chaparrals to the now familiar silver and black motif of the Spurs.

In the first game at the HemisFair Arena the Spurs would lose to the San Diego Conquistadors, despite attracting a noisy crowd of 6,000 fans. A smothering defense was the team's image, as they held opponents less than 100 points an ABA record 49 times. The early Spurs were led by ABA veteran James Silas, and the team would get stronger as the season went on as they twice took advantage of the Virginia Squires, acquiring Swen Nater, who would go on to win Rookie of the Year, in November, and "The Iceman" George Gervin in January. The ABA tried to halt the Gervin deal, claiming it was detrimental to the league, but a judge would rule in the Spurs' favor, and Gervin made his Spurs debut on February 7th. The Spurs would go on to finish with a 45-39 record, good for 3rd place in the Western Division. In the playoffs, the Spurs would battle the Indiana Pacers to the bitter end before falling in 7 games. Following the season, the ownership decided to complete the purchase and to keep the team in San Antonio permanently.[3]

The team quickly made themselves at home at San Antonio's HemisFair Arena, playing to increasingly large and raucous crowds. Despite a respectable 17-10 start during the 1974-75 season, Coach Tom Nissalke was fired as owners become tired of the Spurs' slow defensive style of games. He would be replaced by Bob Bass, who stated that the Spurs would have an entirely new playing style: "It is my belief that you cannot throw a set offense at another professional team for 48 minutes. You've got to let them play some schoolyard basketball." George Gervin and James Silas took that style to heart, as the Spurs became an exciting fast breaking team on the way to a solid 51-33 record, good enough for 2nd place in the West. Gervin: "Our whole theory was that you shoot 100 times, we'll shoot 107." However, in the playoffs the Spurs would fall to the Indiana Pacers in 6 games.

Even though playoff success would elude the team, the Spurs had suddenly found themselves among the top teams in the ABA. In 1976, the ABA folded, threatening the future of San Antonio's sole professional sports franchise. The NBA, however, decided to admit four ABA teams into the league, with the Spurs being one of them, along with the Denver Nuggets, the Indiana Pacers and the New York Nets.

The Spurs and the other three ABA teams agreed to pay the owners of a 5th team, the Spirits of St. Louis, a portion of all television profits during their NBA tenure. This amounts to roughly 1/7th of their television profit every year. This agreement has placed particular financial pressure on the Spurs and the other three former ABA teams.[4]

Into the NBA: The George Gervin years (1976-1985)

Although there was some initial skepticism in league circles regarding the potential success and talent levels of the incoming ABA teams, the Spurs would prove worthy of NBA inclusion during the 1976-77 season with a record of 44-38, good for a tie for fourth place overall in the Eastern Conference. This was done in spite of significant handicaps the NBA imposed on the incoming ABA teams, limiting their draft picks and television revenues during their early time in the merged league.

During the 1977-78 season, George Gervin and David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets would battle all season for the NBA scoring title. On the final day of the season, Thompson would take the lead by scoring 73 points in an afternoon game against the Detroit Pistons. That night Gervin knew he needed 58 points against the Jazz in New Orleans. Gervin would get off to a good start by scoring 20 points in the 1st Quarter. In the 2nd, The Iceman was even better, setting a single period record with 33 points. Early on in the 3rd period Gervin would score his 58 points on the way to 63 capturing the scoring title. While Gervin was lighting up the scoreboard the Spurs were winning the Central Division with a 52-30 record. However, in the playoffs the Spurs would be stunned in 6 games by the Washington Bullets despite an outstanding series from Gervin who averaged 33.2 ppg.

The Spurs would go on to capture 5 division titles in their first 7 years in the NBA and became a perennial playoff participant. However, in the playoffs, the Spurs would never find a break, losing to teams like the Washington Bullets, the Boston Celtics, the Houston Rockets, and the Los Angeles Lakers.

As the 80s progressed, the Spurs would see their shares of highs and lows. For the first few seasons of the decade, the Spurs continued their success of the 1970s with records of 52-30 in 1980-81, 48-34 in 1981-82, and 53-29 in 1982-83. Despite their regular season success, the Spurs were unable to win any NBA championships, losing in the Western Conference playoffs to the Houston Rockets in 1981 and the Los Angeles Lakers in 1982 and 1983.

After the 1984-85 season, Gervin, who arguably had been the Spurs' biggest star, was traded to the Chicago Bulls in what effectively signaled the end of the era that began when the Spurs first moved to San Antonio.

Hard times (1985-1989)

The next four seasons were a dark time in Spurs' history, with the team having a combined record of 115-215 from 1985-86 until 1988-89. The losing seasons and dwindling attendance often caused the Spurs to be mentioned as a potential candidate for relocation to another city. The lone bright spot during this period was the Spurs being awarded the top pick in the 1987 NBA draft through NBA Draft Lottery. The Spurs used this selection on United States Naval Academy standout David Robinson. Although drafted in 1987, the Spurs would have to wait until the 1989-90 season to see Robinson actually play, due to a two-year commitment he had to serve with the United States Navy. Although there was speculation that Robinson might choose not to sign with the Spurs and to become a free agent once his Navy commitment ended,[5] [6] Robinson decided in the end to come to San Antonio.

Although the 1988-89 season was the second-worst in Spurs history at 21-61, it was notable for several reasons. It was the first season of full ownership for Red McCombs, who was an original investor in the team and helped solidify local ownership for the team. Additionally, the 1988-89 season featured the debut of Larry Brown as the Spurs head coach who moved to San Antonio after winning the NCAA National Championship with the University of Kansas in 1988.

Mr. Robinson's neighborhood (1989-1997)

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Spurs logo from 1990 to 2002.
As the 1980s ended, the 1989-90 season proved to be the rebirth of the Spurs franchise. With his tour of duty over, David Robinson arrived to the Spurs along with the newly added Terry Cummings and 1989 draftee Sean Elliott. With these additions, the Spurs achieved the then biggest one-season turnaround in NBA History, finishing with a record of 56-26. The Spurs eventually lost in the Western Conference semifinals after losing a seven-game series to the eventual Western Conference champion Portland Trail Blazers. Robinson had one of the most successful rookie seasons for a center in NBA history, finishing the season as Rookie of the Year while averaging 24.3 points and 12.0 rebounds.

The Spurs began the 1990s with great optimism. The team became a perennial playoff presence, although unable to advance further than the second round of the NBA Playoffs under Brown's tutelage. Late in the 1991-92 season, McCombs fired Brown and replaced him with Bob Bass who finished the season as interim head coach. Without a healthy David Robinson, the Spurs were swept out of the first round of the playoffs by the Phoenix Suns. McCombs made national headlines during the summer of 1992 with the hiring of former UNLV head coach Jerry Tarkanian. The Tarkanian experiment proved a flop, as the coach was fired 20 games into the 1992-93 season with the Spurs record at 9-11. After Rex Hughes filled the coaching shoes for one game, NBA veteran John Lucas was named head coach. It was Lucas's first NBA coaching assignment although he had gained recognition in league circles for his success in helping NBA players rehab from drug abuse.

The Lucas era started out successfully. His coaching propelled the team to a 39-22 finish over the rest of the regular season, and the team reached the Western Conference semi-finals, losing to the Phoenix Suns. The 1992-93 season also marked the last that the Spurs would play in HemisFair Arena. In 1993 local businessman Peter M. Holt and a group of 22 investors purchased the Spurs from Red McCombs for $75 million.

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The Alamodome, home to the Spurs from 1993 to 2002.
The following season, the Spurs first in the newly built Alamodome, Lucas led the Spurs to a 55-27 record but the team suffered a loss in the first round of the playoffs to the Utah Jazz, which led to the immediate firing of Lucas as head coach. Prior to the season the Spurs traded fan-favorite Elliott to the Detroit Pistons in return for rebounding star Dennis Rodman.

Lucas was replaced by former Pacers coach Bob Hill for the 1994-95 season, which would turn out to be the Spurs' most successful regular season until 2006. Elliott returned to the team after an uneventful season with the Pistons, and the team finished with the NBA's best record at 62-20. David Robinson was named the league's Most Valuable Player. The Spurs reached the Western Conference Finals, but lost to the eventual NBA Champion Houston Rockets. After the pregame MVP award ceremony honoring David Robinson, Hakeem Olajuwon dominated the game, outscoring Robinson 42-22 in a Rockets win. Throughout the season, and particularly in the playoffs, there appeared to be friction developing between Rodman and several Spurs' teammates, most notably Robinson, and Rodman was traded after the season to the Chicago Bulls.

The Spurs finished the next season (1995-96) under Hill at 59-23 and lost in the Western Conference semi-finals to the Jazz. Few observers could have predicted how far the Spurs would fall during the 1996-97 season. An injury limited Robinson to just six games during the season, and Elliott also missed more than half the season due to injury. The Spurs ended the season with a 20-62 record, the worst in franchise history. Hill only lasted 18 games as coach that season, eventually being fired and replaced by Spurs General Manager Gregg Popovich, who had also served a stint under Brown as an assistant coach.

Although the 1996-97 season was not successful on the court for the Spurs, the offseason proved to be the opposite. With the third-worst record in the league, the Spurs won the NBA's draft lottery, which gave them the top pick in the 1997 draft. The Spurs used their pick to select Wake Forest University product and consensus All-American Tim Duncan.
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The drafting of Tim Duncan in 1997 was a turning point in the history of the Spurs.

The championship era (1997-present)

The Twin Towers: Duncan and Robinson (1997-2003)

Duncan quickly emerged as a force in the NBA during the 1997-98 season, averaging 21.1 points and 11.9 rebounds per game as a power forward. He was named First Team All-NBA while winning Rookie of the Year honors. The team ended up at 56-26, breaking their own record in 1989-90 for the biggest single season improvement for wins, but once again lost to the Jazz in the Western Conference semifinals. While both Duncan and Robinson played low-post roles, the two seamlessly meshed on the court. The March 14, 1998, game against the Chicago Bulls set the Spurs' current regular-season home attendance record. An Alamodome crowd of 37,492 came to see Michael Jordan's last visit as a Bull, as he led the team to its third-straight and most recent championship.

With a healthy Robinson and Duncan and the additions of playoff veterans such as Mario Elie and Jerome Kersey, the Spurs looked forward to the 1998-99 season. Prior to the beginning of training camps, however, the NBA owners, led by commissioner David Stern, locked out the players in order to force a new collective bargaining agreement with the NBA Players Association (NBAPA). The season was delayed over three months until resolution on a new labor agreement was reached in January 1999.

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Three of the San Antonio Spurs' four championship trophies
Playing a shortened 50-game season, the Spurs ended up with a 37-13 record. The team was just as dominant in the playoffs, rolling through the Western Conference with a record of 11-1. They faced the New York Knicks in the NBA Finals and, on June 25, 1999, won the series and the franchise's first NBA Championship in Game 5 (final score: 78-77) on the Knicks' home court, Madison Square Garden. Duncan was named the Finals MVP. The victory by the Spurs was not only the first NBA title to be won by a former ABA team, but also was the first Finals appearance by a team from the ABA. The Spurs also set a new NBA Finals one-game attendance record when 39,554 fans attended Game 2. The previous record was set only two days earlier, when 39,514 spectators attended Game 1.

The Spurs were not able to capitalize on their success during the 1999-2000 season. Although they finished with an overall record of 53-29, the Spurs lost in the first round to the Suns, primarily due to an injury to Duncan which kept him out of the playoff series. The long-term viability of the Spurs franchise in San Antonio was, however, achieved during the 1999-2000 season, as Bexar County voters approved increases on car rental and hotel taxes which would allow for the construction of a new arena near Freeman Coliseum.

The Spurs finished with 58-24 records for both the 2000-01 and 2001-02 seasons but found themselves suffering playoff ousters in both seasons from the eventual NBA Champion Los Angeles Lakers.

Entering the 2002-03 season, the team knew it would be memorable for at least two reasons, as David Robinson announced that it would be his last in the NBA and the Spurs would begin play at their new arena, the SBC Center, named after telecommunications giant SBC, whose corporate headquarters are located in San Antonio. (SBC became AT&T after its acquisition of its former parent company.) To mark this occasion, the Spurs revamped their "Fiesta" logo and reverted to the familiar silver and black motif (though, during the time of the Fiesta logo, the uniform remained silver and black).

This version of the Spurs was very different from the team that had won the title a few years earlier. The Spurs had remade their team in an attempt to dethrone the three-time defending NBA Champion Los Angeles Lakers. Second-year French star Tony Parker, drafted by the Spurs in the first round of the 2001 NBA Draft, was now the starting point guard for the Spurs. The squad featured a variety of newly acquired three-point shooters, including Stephen Jackson, Danny Ferry, Bruce Bowen, Steve Kerr, Steve Smith and Argentina product Manu Ginobili, a 1999 second-round draft choice playing in his first NBA season. Mixing the inside presences of Duncan and Robinson with the newer outside threats, the Spurs earned a 60-22 record. In the playoffs, the Spurs defeated the Suns, Lakers and Dallas Mavericks en route to facing the New Jersey Nets in the NBA Finals. The series against the Nets marked the first time two former ABA teams would play each other for the NBA Championship. The Spurs won the series 4-2, giving them their second NBA Championship in franchise history. Duncan was named both the NBA Regular Season and Finals MVP for the season.

The big three: Duncan, Parker and Ginobili (2003-present)

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The Spurs visit the White House after their championship in 2003.
In the 2003-04 season, coming off their second NBA Championship, the Spurs, playing with 9 new players, struggled early as they missed the presence of David Robinson while the new players struggled to fit in, as they held a 9-10 record on December 3rd. However, the Spurs would turn it around, as they ended December on 13-game winning streak and quickly climbed back to the top of the NBA standings. The Spurs would battle all year for the top spot in the Western Conference, as they ended the season on another strong note winning their final 11 games. However, they would fall 1 game short of a division title and the best record in the West, posting a record of 57-25. In the playoffs, the Spurs remained hot as they swept the Memphis Grizzlies in 4 straight games. In the second round, the Spurs found themselves in another showdown with the Los Angeles Lakers. The Spurs' winning streak would continue as they captured the first two games at home, bringing their winning streak from the end of the regular season up to 17 games. However, as the series shifted to Los Angeles, the Spurs would suddenly have trouble finding the basket, as they lost both games as the Lakers evened the series. The series was playing out similarly to the match-up between the two teams a year earlier. In Game 5 at the SBC Center, Tim Duncan seemingly delivered the Spurs a 73-72 win as he gave the Spurs a lead with a dramatic shot with just 0.4 seconds remaining. However, the Lakers' Derek Fisher would launch a prayer as time expired which would go in, giving the Lakers a stunning 74-73 win to take a 3-2 series lead.[7][8][9] The Spurs protested the shot, arguing that the clock started late, which the Spurs claimed was why replays showed Fisher got off the shot in time.[10][9] An AP report and the three officials in attendance stated that replays showed the shot was released by Fisher before time expired.[9][11] The officials, however, could not consider the Spurs' claim that the clock did not start immediately when the ball was inbounded. After the stunning loss, the Spurs traveled to Los Angeles for Game 6, where they lost the game and the series. The Spurs spent the following offseason tweaking the team.

With the acquisition of guard Brent Barry from Seattle, and the later additions of center Nazr Mohammed from New York (acquired in a midseason trade of Malik Rose), and veteran forward Glenn Robinson from free agency, alongside regulars Bruce Bowen, Robert Horry, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili, and Tim Duncan, the Spurs finished the 2004-05 season with the second-best record in the Western Conference at 59-23, and the best record in the Southwest Division. In the postseason, the Spurs defeated the Denver Nuggets 4-1, the Seattle SuperSonics 4-2 and the Phoenix Suns 4-1 before advancing to the NBA Finals, where they won the NBA championship for a third time in seven years on June 23, 2005 by defeating the Eastern Conference champion and defending NBA Champion Detroit Pistons, four games to three. Tim Duncan was named Finals MVP, becoming only the fourth player to win the MVP award three times (joining Magic Johnson, Shaquille O'Neal, and Michael Jordan). Also, Manu Ginobili established himself as a NBA star, earning local, national, and international fan praise (particularly in his home country of Argentina) and a berth in that season's All-Star Game.

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AT&T Center at night.
In the 2005-06 season, the Spurs acquired veteran free agent Michael Finley who along with Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and newly-named All-Star Tony Parker, broke their franchise record for wins in a season (63-19) and qualified for the playoffs for the ninth year in a row. (Until this season, the Spurs and Indiana Pacers shared the NBA's longest active consecutive playoff appearance streak with nine in a row — see Active NBA playoff appearance streaks - though San Antonio has qualified for its 10th consecutive appearance during the 2006-07 season, while Indiana's playoff streak ended.) However, the defending-champion Spurs were eliminated in the second round by the Dallas Mavericks in a 7-game semifinal series that, due to a quirk in the playoff ranking system, featured the two top teams in the conference.

In the 2006-07 season, the Spurs finished with a 58-24 record and secured the 3rd seed in the western conference. In their first Playoff series the Spurs faced a tough Denver Nuggets team, yet the Spurs prevailed 4-1. The Spurs went on to face the Phoenix Suns in the second round of the playoffs. The Spurs won 4-2 in a very contentious and controversial series. In the Western Conference finals, the Spurs took on the Utah Jazz, but won their trip to the NBA finals easily, with a comfortable 4-1 win. In the 2007 NBA Finals, the San Antonio Spurs swept the Cleveland Cavaliers and captured their fourth title in nine years.

Future outlook

The Spurs appear poised to contend for NBA titles for several years to come. In the 2007-08 season, they will return 12 of their 15 players from the 2006-07 championship team, including every player that played in the 2007 NBA Playoffs. Their three key players (Duncan, Parker, and Ginobili) are under contract until at least 2010. The Spurs will also have some flexibility with their 2008-2009 roster, as they only currently have 8 of their 15 players with guaranteed contracts for that season.

In the 2007 NBA Draft, the Spurs selected Brazilian forward Tiago Splitter and University of Arizona forward Marcus Williams, adding to their many prospects to which they have rights.

Spurs fans have made links with Tottenham Hotspur F.C. (which also goes by the name Spurs), with the two teams having mutual support for each other. The clubs are planning a business agreement whereby each other's merchandise is sold at the other club (similar to Manchester United F.C. and New York Yankees).

On June 28, 2007, just before the 2007 NBA Draft, the Spurs announced that they have purchased the Austin Toros of the NBA Development League, becoming the second NBA team to purchase an NBADL team (the Los Angeles Lakers were the first, having purchased the Los Angeles D-fenders). This move makes the Spurs the sole NBA affiliate of the Toros and gives them greater control over the management of the team, including coaching and the offensive and defensive schemes that the team uses.

Reputation

The neutrality of this section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
The Spurs are hailed for having "substance over style." ESPN's Greg Anthony commented on the style of the 2006-2007 team by saying:

The Spurs are one of the best dynasties to be witnessed but few are watching what a great team this is. They have no weaknesses and have every right to brag but they don't. They are extremely modest and so annoyingly unselfish that this team is severely under appreciated.


They are often seen as team of "good men with big hearts."[12] There are several other reasons for having this reputation.
  • In a large city, with a town-like feeling, known for its tourism and friendly community, the Spurs seem as low key as the residents. Unlike a few players known for their off or on court antics, the Spurs are relatively quiet with little or no incidents. When former Spur Dennis Rodman played, he often caused fights with other teams and was frequently depicted by the media as a bad boy. Despite his rebounding skills and ability to help win games, he was traded after just 2 years.
  • The Spurs share a unique bond with the city of San Antonio that is unmatched by other teams. Spurs players, coaches, front office personnel, Silver Dancers, The Coyote and former player George Gervin make more than 1,200 appearances in the community each year. Annually, the Spurs and Spurs Foundation support more than 1,800 area organizations with in-kind or cash contributions. They lend their names to various charities for health advocacy, at-risk youth, staying in school campaigns and literacy programs.[13]
  • The Spurs live in a small market (despite San Antonio being the 7th largest city in the United States, the entire metro area is only the 37th largest media market) and opt for endorsing city or state based companies by serving as the spokesperson. Examples include Tim Duncan for H-E-B,[14] Ginobili for Time Warner of San Antonio[15] and both Sean Elliott and Tony Parker for Taco Cabana.[16]
  • Former Spurs, although not having previous ties to the city, chose to settle in San Antonio after their retirement and continue their community involvement. A few key names are George "The Iceman" Gervin, Sean Elliott and David "The Admiral" Robinson.[17]

Season-by-season records

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, % = Win-Loss %
Season W L % Playoffs Results
Dallas Chaparrals (ABA)
(Not included in W/L totals)
1967-684632.590Won First Round
Lost ABA Semifinals
Dallas 3, Houston 0
New Orleans 4, Dallas 1
1968-694137.526Lost First RoundNew Orleans 4, Dallas 3
1969-704539.536Lost First RoundLos Angeles 4, Dallas 2
Texas Chaparrals (ABA)
(Not included in W/L totals)
1970-713054.357Lost First RoundUtah 4, Texas 0
Dallas Chaparrals (ABA)
(Not included in W/L totals)
1971-724242.500Lost First RoundUtah 4, Dallas 0
1972-732856.333
San Antonio Spurs (ABA)
(Not included in W/L totals)
1973-744539.536Lost First RoundIndiana 4, San Antonio 3
1974-755133.607Lost First RoundIndiana 4, San Antonio 2
1975-765034.595Lost First RoundNew York 4, San Antonio 3
San Antonio Spurs (NBA)
(Included in W/L totals)
1976-774438.537Lost First RoundBoston 2, San Antonio 0
1977-785230.634Lost Conference SemifinalsWashington 4, San Antonio 2
1978-794834.585Won Conference Semifinals
Lost Conference Finals
San Antonio 4, Philadelphia 3
Washington 4, San Antonio 3
1979-804141.500Lost First RoundHouston 2, San Antonio 1
1980-815230.634Lost Conference SemifinalsHouston 4, San Antonio 3
1981-824834.585Won Conference Semifinals
Lost Conference Finals
San Antonio 4, Seattle 1
Los Angeles 4, San Antonio 0
1982-835329.646Won Conference Semifinals
Lost Conference Finals
San Antonio 4, Denver 1
Los Angeles 4, San Antonio 2
1983-843745.451
1984-854141.500Lost First RoundDenver 3, San Antonio 2
1985-863547.427Lost First RoundLA Lakers 3, San Antonio 0
1986-872854.341
1987-883151.378Lost First RoundLA Lakers 3, San Antonio 0
1988-892161.256
1989-905626.683Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 3, Denver 0
Portland 4, San Antonio 3
1990-915527.671Lost First RoundGolden State 3, San Antonio 1
1991-924735.573Lost First RoundPhoenix 3, San Antonio 0
1992-934933.598Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 3, Portland 1
Phoenix 4, San Antonio 2
1993-945527.671Lost First RoundUtah 3, San Antonio 1
1994-956220.756Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Lost Conference Finals
San Antonio 3, Denver 0
San Antonio 4, LA Lakers 2
Houston 4, San Antonio 2
1995-965923.720Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 3, Phoenix 1
Utah 4, San Antonio 2
1996-972062.244
1997-985626.683Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 3, Phoenix 1
Utah 4, San Antonio 1
1998-993713.740Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Won Conference Finals
Won NBA Finals
San Antonio 3, Minnesota 1
San Antonio 4, LA Lakers 0
San Antonio 4, Portland 0
San Antonio 4, New York 1
1999-20005329.646Lost First RoundPhoenix 3, San Antonio 1
2000-015824.707Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Lost Conference Finals
San Antonio 3, Minnesota 1
San Antonio 4, Dallas 1
LA Lakers 4, San Antonio 0
2001-025824.707Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 3, Seattle 2
LA Lakers 4, San Antonio 1
2002-036022.732Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Won Conference Finals
Won NBA Finals
San Antonio 4, Phoenix 2
San Antonio 4, LA Lakers 2
San Antonio 4, Dallas 2
San Antonio 4, New Jersey 2
2003-045725.695Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 4, Memphis 0
LA Lakers 4, San Antonio 2
2004-055923.720Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Won Conference Finals
Won NBA Finals
San Antonio 4, Denver 1
San Antonio 4, Seattle 2
San Antonio 4, Phoenix 1
San Antonio 4, Detroit 3
2005-066319.768Won First Round
Lost Conference Semifinals
San Antonio 4, Sacramento 2
Dallas 4, San Antonio 3
2006-075824.707Won First Round
Won Conference Semifinals
Won Conference Finals
Won NBA Finals
San Antonio 4, Denver 1
San Antonio 4, Phoenix 2
San Antonio 4, Utah 1
San Antonio 4, Cleveland 0
Totals14931017.595
Playoffs144118.5504 Championships (Playoff series record: 30–23; Finals games record: 16–6)

Arena history

Dallas (Texas) Chaparrals San Antonio Spurs

Players of note

Basketball Hall of Famers

Retired numbers

  • 00 - Johnny Moore, G, 1980-88 & 1989-90
  • 6 - Avery Johnson, G, 1991, 1992-1993, 1994-2000 (to be retired December 22, 2007)
  • 13 - James Silas, G, 1972-81 (including the last season in Dallas)
  • 32 - Sean Elliott, F, 1989-93 & 1994-2001
  • 44 - George Gervin, G, 1974-85 (Hall of Famer, Voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996)
  • 50 - David Robinson, C, 1989-2003 (Voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996)

Notable former players

''For a complete list of current and former players, see the category.

Current roster

San Antonio Spurs roster
    [ e]
Players Coaches
Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
17USABarry, Brent ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Oregon State
15USABonner, Matt ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Florida
12USABowen, Bruce ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Cal State-Fullerton
21USADuncan, Tim ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Wake Forest
16NEDElson, Francisco ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)UC Berkeley
4USAFinley, Michael ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Wisconsin
20ARGGinobili, Manu ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Argentina
25USAHorry, Robert ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Alabama
FRAMahinmi, Ian ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)France
7ARGOberto, Fabricio ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Argentina
9FRAParker, Tony ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)France
5NGRUdoka, Ime ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Portland State*
14SVNUdrih, Beno ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Slovenia
11USAVaughn, Jacque ft  in ( m) lb ( kg)Kansas
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend:
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • Injured

RosterTransactions • updated 2007-08-02


STARTING LINEUP (as of May 14, 2007) (PG) Tony Parker (SG) Michael Finley (SF) Bruce Bowen (PF) Tim Duncan*/ Rob Horry (C) Fabricio Oberto
  • Occationally plays as Center instead of Oberto

Player positions

Table below indicates each player's most frequently played positions in bold and with link.
Secondary positions are in normal text and unlinked.
  • Primary: the usual starter and player likely to get the most minutes in that position.
  • Substitute: consistently comes off bench and receives regular minutes or often rotates into that position from a different starting position.
  • Fill-in: either plays only occasionally or fills in a non-standard role for a brief period.
Position Primary Substitute Fill-in
Point guardTony ParkerJacque Vaughn
Beno Udrih[18]
Manu Ginobili
Brent Barry
Shooting guardMichael FinleyManu Ginobili
Brent Barry
Beno Udrih
Small forwardBruce BowenMichael FinleyBrent Barry
Manu Ginobili
Power forwardTim DuncanRobert Horry
Fabricio Oberto
Francisco Elson
CenterFabricio ObertoFrancisco Elson
Tim Duncan
Robert Horry

Unsigned draftees and development league signees

The Spurs have been uncommonly successful among NBA teams in finding foreign talent as demonstrated by selecting Manu Ginobili ( 1999 NBA Draft 57th pick) and Tony Parker ( 2001 NBA Draft 29th pick) who have both become All Stars. The Spurs own the NBA rights to the players listed in the table below. The typical pattern is to allow the player to develop in leagues outside the USA. The player is free to negotiate contracts in other leagues and is not obligated to play in the NBA. Sometimes, a player's overseas contract may have an expensive buyout clause that would discourage the Spurs from seeking to bring him in.
CRobertas Javtokas2001 NBA Draft56th pick
CSergey Karaulov2004 NBA Draft58th pick
SFViktor Sanikidze2004 NBA Draft42nd pick
PFTiago Splitter2007 NBA Draft28th pick

Head coaches

Years Active Name Record (W-L) Winning Percentage Playoff Record
(W-L)
Postseason Percentage Playoff Appearances Division Titles Conference Titles NBA Championships Current Status
19961–presentGregg Popovich576-276.67692-51.64310644Head Coach, Spurs
1994–961Bob Hill124-58.68114-11.5602200Fired by Seattle SuperSonics, April 2007
19922–94John Lucas94-49.6576-8.4292000Retired from coaching
19922Jerry Tarkanian9-11.450N/AN/A0000Retired from Fresno State in 2002
19923Bob Bass26-18.5910-3.0001000Retired as GM of New Orleans Hornets in 2004
1988–923Larry Brown153-131.5397-7.5002200Executive VP, Philadelphia 76ers
1986–88Bob Weiss59-105.3600-3.0001000Fired by Seattle SuperSonics, January 2006
1984–86Cotton Fitzsimmons76-88.4632-6.2502000Deceased
19834–84Bob Bass26-25.510N/AN/A0000Retired as GM of New Orleans Hornets in 2004
19834Morris McHone11-20.355N/AN/A0000Head Coach, Sioux Falls Skyforce
1980–83Stan Albeck153-93.62213-14.4813300Partially paralyzed by stroke in 2001
19805Bob Bass8-8.5001-2.3331000Retired as GM of New Orleans Hornets in 2004
1976–805Doug Moe177-135.5679-13.4093200Assistant Coach, Denver Nuggets


1During the 1996–97 season, Bob Hill coached 18 regular season games. Hill was fired on December 10, 1996, and Gregg Popovich coached the reaming 64 regular season games.
2During the 1992–93 season, Jerry Tarkanian coached 20 regular season games. Tarkanian was fired on December 18, 1992, Rex Hughes then coached one regular season game and John Lucas coached the remaining 61 regular season games as well as the playoffs.
3During the 1991–92 season, Larry Brown coached 38 regular season games. Brown was fired on January 21, 1992, and Bob Bass coached the remaining 44 regular season games as well as the playoffs.
4During the 1983–84 season, Morris McHone coached 31 regular season games. McHone was fired on December 28, 1983, and Bob Bass coached the remaining 51 regular season games.
5During the 1979–80 season, Doug Moe coached 66 regular season games. Moe was fired on March 1, 1980, and Bob Bass coached the remaining 16 regular season games as well as the playoffs.

References

1. ^ City Celebrates NBA Title, San Antonio Style, USA Today, 1999.
2. ^ Dallas Chaparrals History
3. ^ Spurs ABA History
4. ^ Spirit of ABA deal lives on for Silna brothers. ESPN.com.
5. ^ SPORTS OF THE TIMES; THE ROBINSON PLOT THICKENS, The New York Times, May 18, 1987.
6. ^ The Summer Our Ship Came In, Tom Orsborn, San Antonio Express-News, May 20, 2007.
7. ^ "Parker perplexed once again", San Antonio Express-News, May 14, 2004.
8. ^ "S.A. is heartbreak city", San Antonio Express-News, May 14, 2004.
9. ^ Fisher’s Jumper Gives Lakers Dramatic Game 5 Win, NBA.com, May 13, 2004. Last accessed February 7, 2007.
10. ^ Triple Crown bid nabs viewers, Houston Chronicle, May 17, 2004.
11. ^ No Time to Lose, The Washington Post, May 14, 2004, Last accessed February 7, 2007.
12. ^ Rubs Me Raw: Spurs deserve more respect. MySA.com.
13. ^ The Spurs in the community. NBA.com/Spurs/.
14. ^ HEB Grocery Stores official website
15. ^ Go for 3 promotion. Time Warner Cable of San Antonio.
16. ^ Taco Cabana official website
17. ^ A tribute to David Robinson. MySA.com.
18. ^ Udrih relegated to third-string status for Spurs, San Antonio Express-News, Dec. 25, 2006.
  • All facts and records taken from the San Antonio Spurs' history section.

External links

Preceded by
Chicago Bulls
1996 and 1997 and 1998
NBA Champions
San Antonio Spurs

1999
Succeeded by
Los Angeles Lakers
2000 and 2001 and 2002
Preceded by
Los Angeles Lakers
2000 and 2001 and 2002
NBA Champions
San Antonio Spurs

2003
Succeeded by
Detroit Pistons
2004
Preceded by
Detroit Pistons
2004
NBA Champions
San Antonio Spurs

2005
Succeeded by
Miami Heat
2006
Preceded by
Miami Heat
2006
NBA Champions
San Antonio Spurs

2007
Succeeded by
Current Champions


This box:     [ edit]
Sports teams based in South Texas
BaseballTL: Corpus Christi HooksSan Antonio Missions, AA: Coastal Bend Aviators, ULB: Brownsville TorosEdinburg CoyotesLaredo BroncosRio Grande Valley WhiteWings
BasketballNBA: San Antonio Spurs, WNBA: San Antonio Silver Stars, D-League: Rio Grande Valley Vipers, CBA: Rio Grande Valley Silverados, UBL: San Antonio Soul
Footballaf2: Corpus Christi SharksLaredo LobosRio Grande Valley Dorados, IFL: Corpus Christi Hammerheads
HockeyAHL: San Antonio Rampage, CHL: Corpus Christi RayzLaredo BucksRio Grande Valley Killer Bees
SoccerPDL: Laredo Heat

(NCAA Division I)
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi • Texas State University-San Marcos • University of Texas-Pan American • University of Texas at San Antonio


    [ e]
Dallas Chaparrals/San Antonio Spurs Head Coaches
HaganWilliamsBlakelyNissalkeMcCarthyD. BrownNissalkeBassMoeBassMoeAlbeckMcHoneBassFitzsimmonsWeissL. BrownBassTarkanianHughesLucasHillPopovich








The Western Conference of the National Basketball Association is made up of fifteen teams, and organized in three divisions of five teams each.

Since 2006, the three division winners and the non-division winner with the best record are seeded 1 through 4 for the
..... Click the link for more information.
Southwest Division Current Standings
# Team W L PCT GB
1 sw-Dallas Mavericks 67 15 .817 -
2 x-San Antonio Spurs (3) 58 24 .707 9
3 x-Houston Rockets (5) 52 30 .634 15
4 New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets 39 43 .476 28
5 o-Memphis Grizzlies 22 60 .
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1930s  1940s  1950s  - 1960s -  1970s  1980s  1990s
1964 1965 1966 - 1967 - 1968 1969 1970

Year 1967 (MCMLXVII
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1930s  1940s  1950s  - 1960s -  1970s  1980s  1990s
1964 1965 1966 - 1967 - 1968 1969 1970

Year 1967 (MCMLXVII
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1967 1968 1969 - 1970 - 1971 1972 1973

Year 1970 (MCMLXX
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1968 1969 1970 - 1971 - 1972 1973 1974

Year 1971 (MCMLXXI
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1970 1971 1972 - 1973 - 1974 1975 1976
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1968 1969 1970 - 1971 - 1972 1973 1974

Year 1971 (MCMLXXI
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1970 1971 1972 - 1973 - 1974 1975 1976
..... Click the link for more information.
AT&T Center is an indoor arena located in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was completed in 2002 as the SBC Center at a cost of $175 million, financed by county issued bonds which were supported by a hotel-occupancy and car rental tax increase and an additional contribution of
..... Click the link for more information.
City of San Antonio

Flag
Seal
Nickname: Alamo City; River City; SA-Town; Countdown City (based on the "210" area code)
Location in the state of Texas
Coordinates:
..... Click the link for more information.
Peter M. Holt (born 1949 in Peoria, Illinois) is a businessman. He is the CEO of HOLT CAT, the largest Caterpillar dealership in the United States and chairman, CEO, and owner of Spurs Sports & Entertainment, which is made up by the WNBA's San Antonio Silver Stars, the AHL's San
..... Click the link for more information.
R.C. Buford is the general manager of the San Antonio Spurs NBA basketball team. He was given the title by his predecessor, Gregg Popovich, in 2002 after five seasons as team president.
..... Click the link for more information.
Gregg Popovich (Popović/Поповић in Serbian), (born January 28, 1949 in East Chicago, Indiana) is the head coach of the National Basketball Association's San Antonio Spurs.
..... Click the link for more information.
Sport Basketball
Founded 2001
No. of teams 14
Country(ies)  United States

Most recent champion(s) Dakota Wizards

Official website NBA.
..... Click the link for more information.
Austin Toros

Founded 2001
History Columbus Riverdragons
2001-2005
Austin Toros
2005-Present
Arena Austin Convention Center
City Austin, Texas
Team Colors Black, Silver
Head Coach Quin Snyder
..... Click the link for more information.
The 1999 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1998-99 NBA season. The San Antonio Spurs of the Western Conference took on the New York Knicks of the Eastern Conference for the title, with the Spurs holding home court advantage.
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The 2003 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 2002-03 NBA season. The San Antonio Spurs of the Western Conference took on the New Jersey Nets of the Eastern Conference for the title, with the Spurs holding home court advantage.
..... Click the link for more information.
The 2005 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 2004-05 National Basketball Association season. The San Antonio Spurs of the Western Conference took on the Detroit Pistons of the Eastern Conference for the title, with the Spurs holding home court advantage.
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The 2007 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 2006-07 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 2007 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion San Antonio Spurs and the Eastern Conference champion
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20th century - 21st century
1960s  1970s  1980s  - 1990s -  2000s  2010s  2020s
1996 1997 1998 - 1999 - 2000 2001 2002

Year 1999 (MCMXCIX
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20th century - 21st century - 22nd century
1970s  1980s  1990s  - 2000s -  2010s  2020s  2030s
2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006

2003 by topic:
News by month
Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun
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20th century - 21st century - 22nd century
1970s  1980s  1990s  - 2000s -  2010s  2020s  2030s
2002 2003 2004 - 2005 - 2006 2007 2008

2005 by topic:
News by month
Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun
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20th century - 21st century - 22nd century
1970s  1980s  1990s  - 2000s -  2010s  2020s  2030s
2004 2005 2006 - 2007 - 2008 2009 2010

2007 by topic:
News by month
Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1975 1976 1977 - 1978 - 1979 1980 1981

Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII
..... Click the link for more information.
19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1940s  1950s  1960s  - 1970s -  1980s  1990s  2000s
1976 1977 1978 - 1979 - 1980 1981 1982

Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins.

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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s
1978 1979 1980 - 1981 - 1982 1983 1984

Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s
1979 1980 1981 - 1982 - 1983 1984 1985

Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s
1980 1981 1982 - 1983 - 1984 1985 1986

Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII
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20th century - 21st century
1960s  1970s  1980s  - 1990s -  2000s  2010s  2020s
1987 1988 1989 - 1990 - 1991 1992 1993

Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar).
..... Click the link for more information.


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