State of Nagar

State of Nagar

This article is part of the series:
Historical regions of Pakistan
Enlarge picture
Map of Pakistan with State of Nagar highlighted
Capital
Nagar
Area
5,000 km²
Main language(s)Burushaski, Shina
Established14th century
Abolished25th September, 1974
'''Historic regions of Pakistan
Original Provinces

One-Unit Provinces
Former States
Other subdivisions
Northern Areas Government Website
The State of Nagar(Urdu.ریاست نگر) is a former princely state in the northernmost part of the Northern Areas of Pakistan, which existed until 1974. The state bordered the Gilgit Agency to the south and west, and the former princely state of Hunza to the north and east. The state capital was the town of Nagar. The area of Nagar now forms two tehsils of Gilgit District. Nagar along with Gilgit and Baltistan is claimed by India as part of the state of Jammu & Kashmir.

History

Nagar was an autonomous principality in close association with neighbouring Hunza. The British gained control of both states 1889 and 1892. The British retained Nagar's status as a 'principality' until 1947 but together with Hunza it was considered a vassal of Kashmir, although never ruled directly by it. The rulers of Nagar sent annual tributes to the Kashmir Durbar until 1947, and along with the ruler of Hunza, were considered amongst the most loyal vassals of the Maharaja of Kashmir.

In 1947, the state acceded to Pakistan, but continued as semi autonomous state. A freedom movement for democracy against the Mir's monarchy started in 1968 led by Syed Yaha Shah the first educated politician of Nagar studied from Adward College Peshawar.The movement demanded democracy and right of people to get education and to end the heavy taxation of the people. As a result dozens of people and the main leaders including Syed Yahya Shah were imprisoned for life with the help of Government of Pakistan prosecuting them as rebels of the State. Nine people were killed on demonstrating against imprisonment of their leaders. When Ayub Khan's dictatorship ended in Pakistan and the democratic government of the Pakistan Peoples Party under Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto came into power through elections it realized the sentiments of the people against the Mir for democracy so the Government freed the prisoners of the movement and dissolved the Mirs of Hunza and Nagar and were merged into the Northern Areas in 1974.[1]
Enlarge picture
The Hunza valley looking across the river to Nagar
Enlarge picture
Mount Rakaposhi

Government

The state was governed by the hereditary rulers of the Maghlot dynasty who were styled as Mir and were assisted by a council of Wazirs or Ministers. Details for early rulers are uncertain with the first definite dates available from 1839 CE onwards.

ReignMirs of Nagar[2]
Unknown datesFadl Khan
Unknown datesDaud Khan
Unknown datesAli Dad Khan (1st time)
Unknown datesHari Tham Khan
Unknown datesAli Dad Khan (2nd time)
Unknown datesKamal Khan
Unknown datesRahim Khan I
Unknown date - 1839Rahim Khan II
1839 - 1891Jafar Zahid Khan (1st time)
1891 - 1892Raja Azur Khan (acting)
1892 - 1904Jafar Zahid Khan (2nd time)
1905 - 17th March 1940Raja Mir Iskandar Khan
17th March 1940 - 25th September 1974Shaukat Ali Khan
25th September 1974State of Nagar dissolved

Geography

The geography of Nagar was very mountainous difficult terrain which provided a certain degree of protection against invading forces. The highest mountain was the 7,788 m (25,551 ft) Mount Rakaposhi which lay to the south of the town of Nagar.

Today, the famous Karakoram Highway crosses Nagar, connecting Pakistan to China via the Khunjerab Pass. The road follows the Hunza river for some distance through Nagar and into the Hunza region.

Demographics

The inhabitants of the Nagar valley is around 90,000 (AKRSP Census, 2000). Nagar is home of people of two main ethnicities - the Burushaski speakers and the Shina speakers. The older type of Broshuski is still spoken in this valley with mild modern accent.

Religion

The population are entirely Shia Muslims, of the Isna Ashree sect.

References

1. ^ Buroshall Say Nagar Tak ka Safar, by Muhammad Ismail Tehseen, Brushal ke Qabail by Syed Yahya Shah,books written in Urdu available in Muncipal library Gilgit
2. ^ Ben Cahoon, WorldStatesmen.org. Pakistan Princely States. Retrieved on 2007-10-03.

Further reading

  • Buroshall say Nagar Tek Ka Safar by Mohammad Ismail Nashad.
  • Rasala Buroshall by Syed Mohammad Yahya Shah.
  • Where the three Empires meet by E.F.Knight /Zafar Hayat Paul

See also

External links

The historical regions of Pakistan are former states, provinces and territories which mainly existed between 1947 and 1975 when the current provinces and territories were finally established.
..... Click the link for more information.
Burushaski (Urdu: بروشسکی - burū́šaskī) is a language isolate spoken by some 87,000 (as of 2000) Burusho people in the Hunza, Nagar, Yasin, and parts of the Gilgit valleys in
..... Click the link for more information.
Shina (also known as Tshina) is a Dardic language and is spoken by a plurality of people in Northern Areas of Pakistan. The Valleys include Astore, Chilas, Dareil, Tangeer, Gilgit, Ghizer, and a few parts of Baltistan and Kohistan.
..... Click the link for more information.
14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400.

Events

  • The transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age
  • Beginning of the Ottoman Empire, early expansion into the Balkans

..... Click the link for more information.
Chief Commissioners Province of Baluchistan was a former province of British India located in the northern parts of modern Balochistan province.

History

The province was originally formed over the period 1876-1891 by three treaties between Robert Sandeman and the Khan of
..... Click the link for more information.
East Bengal was the name used during two periods in the 20th century for a territory that roughly corresponded to the modern state of Bangladesh. Both instances involved a violent partition of Bengal.
..... Click the link for more information.
Federal Capital Territory (FCT) around Karachi was the original capital territory of Pakistan. The FCT was created in 1948 from the city of Karachi and surrounding areas as the location for Pakistan's capital following independence.
..... Click the link for more information.
North-West Frontier Province is a former province of Pakistan which was established in 1901 and dissolved in 1955. The province covered an area of 70,709 km² including much of the current North-West Frontier Province province but excluding the former princely states of Amb,
..... Click the link for more information.
Sind is a former province of Pakistan and British India which existed from 1936 to 1955. The province covered an area of 123,080 km² including much of the current Sindh province but excluding the Federal Capital Territory and the former princely state of Khairpur.
..... Click the link for more information.
West Punjab was a former province of Pakistan which existed from 1947 to 1955. The province covered an area of 160,622 km² including much of the current Punjab province and the Islamabad Capital Territory but excluding the former princely state of Bahawalpur.
..... Click the link for more information.
East Pakistan (now independent Bangladesh) was a former province of Pakistan which existed between 1955 and 1971. East Pakistan was partitioned from Bengal based on plebiscite in then British India in 1947.
..... Click the link for more information.
West Pakistan was the popular and sometimes official (1955–1970) name of the western wing of Pakistan until 1971, when the eastern wing (East Pakistan) became independent as Bangladesh.
..... Click the link for more information.
Amb was a princely state in what is today the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. The state ceased to exist in 1969, when it was merged with the province of West Pakistan.
..... Click the link for more information.
The State of Bahawalpur was a princely state of the Punjab in what is now Pakistan, stretching along the southern bank of the Sutlej and Indus Rivers, with its capital city at Bahawalpur. The state was counted amongst the Rajputana states (now Rajasthan) to the southeast.
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Chitral, or Chitrāl (Urdu: ریاست چترال), was a former princely state of Pakistan and British India which ceased to exist in 1969.
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Dir was a small former princely state located in the modern North-West Frontier Province in Pakistan. The state ceased to exist in 1969 when it was incorporated into Pakistan.
..... Click the link for more information.
''This article is about the former State of Hunza, for the main article see Hunza Valley


Hunza (Urdu: ہنزہ) was a former princely state in the northernmost part of the Northern Areas of Pakistan, which existed until
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Kalat or State of Qalat (Urdu: ریاست قلات) was a princely state located in the centre of the modern province of Balochistan, Pakistan. The state capital was the town of Kalat.
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Khayrpur was a princely state on the Indus River in what is now Pakistan, with its capital city at Khayrpur. Together with Bahawalpur to the north-east, the state was counted amongst the Punjab states rather than the neighbouring Rajputana states (now Rajasthan) to the
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Kharan was an autonomous princely state of both British India and Pakistan, located in the southwest of modern Pakistan.

History

The state of Kharan was established in about 1697 CE as a vassal state of Kalat, a status which remained until 1940.
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Las Bela was princely state of Pakistan and British India which existed until 1955. The state occupied an area of 18,254 km² in the extreme southeast of the Balochistan province with an extensive coastline on the Arabian Sea to the south.
..... Click the link for more information.
See also:


The State of Makran was an autonomous princely state of both British India and Pakistan, which ceased to exist in 1955.
..... Click the link for more information.
The State of Nagar(Urdu.ریاست نگر) is a former princely state in the northernmost part of the Northern Areas of Pakistan, which existed until 1974.
..... Click the link for more information.
The State of Phulra was a minor princely state of both Pakistan and British India, located in the modern North-West Frontier Province. It was situated east of the nearby princely State of Amb.
..... Click the link for more information.
State of Swat (Urdu: ریاست سوات) was a princely state which existed in the north of the modern North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan until it was dissolved in 1969.
..... Click the link for more information.
Baluchistan States Union existed between 3rd October 1952 and 14th October 1955 in southwest Pakistan. It was formed by the states of Kalat, Kharan, Las Bela and Makran with the capital at the town of Kalat.
..... Click the link for more information.
Gilgit Agency was the name of most of the area of northern Kashmir which formed a de facto dependency of Pakistan from 1947 to 1970, which was then merged into Northern Areas.
..... Click the link for more information.
The Trans-Karakoram Tract is an area of nearly 5,800 km² that India claims, was transferred by a border agreement from the Pakistani-administered Northern Areas to China in 1963 with the proviso that the settlement was subject to the final solution of the Kashmir dispute.
..... Click the link for more information.
The Divisions of Pakistan were previously the third tier of government in Pakistan until they were abolished in 2000. The four provinces of Pakistan had been subdivided into administrative "Divisions", which were further subdivided into districts and tehsils.
..... Click the link for more information.
Urdu}}} 
Writing system: Urdu alphabet (Nasta'liq script) 
Official status
Official language of:  Pakistan ;
..... Click the link for more information.


This article is copied from an article on Wikipedia.org - the free encyclopedia created and edited by online user community. The text was not checked or edited by anyone on our staff. Although the vast majority of the wikipedia encyclopedia articles provide accurate and timely information please do not assume the accuracy of any particular article. This article is distributed under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.