Targum Onkelos

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Interlinear text of Hebrew Numbers 6.3–10 with Aramaic Targum Onkelos from the British Library.
Targum Onkelos (or Unkelus), is the official eastern (Babylonian) targum to the Torah. However, its early origins may have been western, in Israel. Its authorship is attributed to Onkelos.

Some identify this translation as the work of Aquila of Sinope in an Aramaic translation (Chajes). The translator is unique in that he avoids any type of anthropomorphism. Samuel D. Luzzatto suggests that the translation was originally meant for the "simple people". This view was strongly refuted by Nosson Adler in his introduction to Nesinah La'Ger.

In Talmudic times, and to this day in Yemenite Jewish communities, Targum Onkelos was recited by heart as a verse-by-verse translation alternatively with the Hebrew verses of the Torah in the synagogue.

The Talmud states that "a person should complete his portions of scripture along with the community, reading the scripture twice and the targum once." This passage is taken to refer to Targum Onkelos.

See also

Sources

  • S. D. Luzatto "Oheiv Ha'ger" (Heb.)
  • N. Adler "Nesinah La'Ger" (Heb.)

External links

  • English Translation of Targum Onkelos at the Newsletter for Targumic and Cognate Studies - English translations by J.W. Etheridge
  • Mechon Mamre has the entire Aramaic text of Targum Onkelos with vowels according to Yemenite manuscripts. The Targum appears as digital text in two different user-friendly versions: (1) The Aramaic targum text with vowels can be viewed in its entirety on its own, either book-by-book or chapter by chapter. (2) The Aramaic targum can be viewed verse-by-verse parallel to the Hebrew text, within files that contain one weekly portion (parshat ha-shavua) at a time. The index to both versions is here; there is also an older version without vowels.
Ancient Mesopotamia

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Cities / Empires
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Akkadian Empire: Akkad
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Assyria: Assur Nineveh
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For other uses, see Targum (disambiguation).


A targum (Hebrew: תרגום, plural: targumim) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled in Palestine or in Babylonia from the Second
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Tanakh
Torah | Nevi'im | Ketuvim
Books of the Torah
1. Genesis
2. Exodus
3. Leviticus
4. Numbers
5.
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The Land of Israel (Hebrew: אֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל, Masoretic: ʼẸreṣ Yiśrāēl, Hebrew Academy: Éreẓ Yisrael, Yiddish:
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Rabbinical Eras
  • Zugot
  • Tannaim
  • Amoraim
  • Savoraim
  • Geonim
  • Rishonim
  • Acharonim
Onkelos (אונקלוס) is the name of a famous convert to Judaism in Talmudic times (c.35-120 CE).
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Aquila of Sinope was a 2nd Century CE native of Pontus in Anatolia known for producing a slavishly literal translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek around 130 CE.[1] He was a proselyte to Judaism and a disciple of Rabbi Akiba[1] (d. circa 135 CE).
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Zvi Hirsch Chajes (Hebrew: צבי הירש חיות - November 20, 1805 - October 12, 1855; also Chayes or Hayot) was one of the foremost Galician talmudic scholars.
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Samuel David Luzzatto (Hebrew: שמואל דוד לוצאטו) was an Italian Jewish scholar, poet, and a member of the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement.
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The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history.

The Talmud has two components: the Mishnah (c.
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Yemenite Jews (Hebrew: תֵּימָנִים, Standard  Temanim Tiberian  Têmānîm; singular
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Tanakh
Torah | Nevi'im | Ketuvim
Books of the Torah
1. Genesis
2. Exodus
3. Leviticus
4. Numbers
5.
..... Click the link for more information.
A synagogue (from ancient Greek: συναγωγή, transliterated synagogē, "assembly"; Hebrew:
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The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history.

The Talmud has two components: the Mishnah (c.
..... Click the link for more information.
For other uses, see Targum (disambiguation).


A targum (Hebrew: תרגום, plural: targumim) is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) written or compiled in Palestine or in Babylonia from the Second
..... Click the link for more information.
Targum Jonathan (תרגום יונתן בן עוזיאל) is the official eastern (Babylonian) targum to the Nevi'im. Its early origins, however, are western i.e.
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Tanakh
Torah | Nevi'im | Ketuvim
Books of the Torah
1. Genesis
2. Exodus
3. Leviticus
4. Numbers
5.
..... Click the link for more information.


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