Top Gun (film)

Top Gun

Promotional movie poster
Directed byTony Scott
Produced byDon Simpson Jerry Bruckheimer
Written byEhud Yonay (article) Jim Cash (screenplay) Jack Epps Jr. (screenplay)
StarringTom Cruise Kelly McGillis Val Kilmer Anthony Edwards Tom Skerritt
Music byHarold Faltermeyer
Distributed byParamount Pictures
Release date(s)May 16, 1986
Running time109 min.
LanguageEnglish
Budget$15,000,000 (estimated)
IMDb profile


Top Gun is a 1986 American film directed by Tony Scott and produced by Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer in association with Paramount Pictures. The screenplay was written by Jim Cash and Jack Epps Jr., and was inspired by an article written by Ehud Yonay for California Magazine entitled "Top Guns." The film stars Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards, Val Kilmer, Tom Skerritt, Michael Ironside, Tim Robbins, and Meg Ryan.

Filming took place over the summer of 1985, almost a year before the film was released. A real-life pilot called Art Scholl was killed during filming in September 1985, and the film was dedicated to his memory.

The film follows LT Pete "Maverick" Mitchell, a young Naval aviator who aspires to be a top fighter pilot in the United States Navy Fighter Weapons School, which trains the top 1% of all Naval aviators. Maverick gets his chance to attend the school after one pilot drops out, allowing him and his RIO (Radar Intercept Officer, the "back seater" in the two-man F-14) LTJG Nick 'Goose' Bradshaw to train with the best. The film opened on May 16, 1986 to good reviews, the aerial scenes being most notably praised. The film accumulated over $350 million world-wide, and broke home-video sales records.

Plot summary

Tom Cruise plays Pete "Maverick" Mitchell, a cocky young United States Navy F-14 Tomcat pilot aboard the USS Enterprise. Maverick is the son of Duke Mitchell, a fighter pilot shot down during the Vietnam War and listed as missing in action with no details, a mystery which haunts Maverick. Former Top Gun instructor pilot (and later Member of Congress) Randy “Duke” Cunningham claimed to have been the inspiration for Maverick, although the movie's producer denied this, saying that the character was not based on any specific aviator.[1] In any case, Duke Mitchell died; Duke Cunningham survived.

The film begins "somewhere in the Indian Ocean" with Maverick and his Radar Intercept Officer (RIO) "Goose" (Anthony Edwards) flying wingman to lead pilot "Cougar" and his RIO "Merlin" (Robbins), en route to intercept an unknown inbound aircraft (a bogey). It turns out to be two hostile MiG-28 aircraft; the country is unnamed, though the adversary pilots (masked by flight helmets) are presumably Soviet advisors flying for some country that is presumably equipped with Soviet equipment and having Soviet military advisors, such as South Yemen. Though restrained by rules of engagement against pre-emptive fire, and despite Cougar being outflown and trapped almost immediately, Maverick manages to intimidate both "bandits" into withdrawing by playing "chicken" with them—gaining a missile lock on the first and outflying the second by entering an inverted dive with the other pilot, as well as flipping him off. Despite this, Cougar is thoroughly shaken and does not obey return-to-base orders, despite his fighter's dwindling fuel supply. Maverick, also low on fuel, disobeys orders and risks his own plane to guide Cougar home.

Enlarge picture
The famous scene where Maverick and Goose along with others sing Righteous Brothers' song You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' to Charlie in an attempt to charm her. The bar they sang in, which has since been demolished, was called "Roxy West."


Cougar is deeply troubled by the incident, risking his life when he has a family to think about. He realizes he has "lost the edge" and "turns in his wings" (resigns). This is serendipitous timing for Maverick and Goose, now the top driver-RIO team in the squadron, as squadron commander Stinger has been called upon to send his best pilot-RIO team to the Navy's elite "TOPGUN" fighter-pilot school (US Navy Fighter Weapons School) at NAS Miramar in San Diego, California. With Cougar gone, Stinger must send Maverick and Goose—something he is reluctant to do, not least because of Maverick's attitude.

While testing his instructors' patience with his reckless flying (on his very first day, he outflies an instructor but breaks two major flight-safety rules in the process) and establishing a rivalry with top student Tom "Iceman" Kazanski (Val Kilmer), Maverick falls in love with his beautiful female civilian instructor, Charlotte "Charlie" Blackwood (Kelly McGillis). Though a talented pilot, Maverick lives up to his name when called upon to be a team player. At one point, flying a mock combat mission with the pilot-RIO team of "Hollywood" and "Wolfman," he abandons his teammates to chase after TOPGUN's chief instructor, Commander Mike "Viper" Metcalf (Tom Skerritt). Though he gives the older pilot a run for his money, Viper's wingman, "Jester" (Michael Ironside), easily defeats first Hollywood and then Maverick himself, proving that teamwork outweighs sheer flying ability.

One of the biggest sub-plots to the film is the love interest between the Cruise and McGillis characters. The MIG incident over the Indian Ocean sparks her initial interest. In an attempt to hear more details, Maverick utters to her a line now entrenched in the American lexicon: "It's classified...I could tell you...but then I'd have to kill you."

Enlarge picture
Maverick contemplates whether he should return to the Navy.
During the next engagement, Maverick and Iceman, ever competitive, chase the same target, with Maverick tailgating Iceman while the latter attempts to gain a missile lock. When Iceman gives up and pulls out, Maverick gets caught in his jet wash; his F-14's engines flame out, and he enters a flat spin from which he cannot recover (not unexpected behavior from the TF30 turbofan engines used in early-model F-14s). He and Goose are forced to eject; echoing a real-life accident, Goose hits the cockpit canopy and is killed. Although Maverick is officially exonerated of fault, he is overwhelmed with guilt and subsequently loses his competitive edge, refusing to take risks and engage enemy targets. During one training exercise, Jester deliberately makes himself an easy target and literally begs to be attacked; despite this, Maverick disengages and retreats.

Finally, unsure of his future and having alienated Charlie with his defeatist attitude, Maverick begins to wonder whether he should remain in the Navy. When he goes to Viper for advice, Viper tells him that he served with Maverick's father in Vietnam, with the VF-51 Screaming Eagles off USS Oriskany. During a fierce dogfight, Duke Mitchell's F-4 was hit, but he refused to disengage, saving three Allied pilots before being downed himself. Unfortunately, the engagement took place "over the wrong line on some map," and the State Department, hoping to avoid an international incident, covered up the details. It is most likely that the dogfight took place over Laos or Cambodia ,where U.S. forces weren't allowed to go as of 1964 (when the dog fight took place) despite the fact that the Viet Cong ran supplies through these countries. Maverick decides that he will graduate from TOPGUN and remain a pilot. (Later in the Vietnam War, U.S. pilots were bombing Cambodia.)

During the post-graduation party, the best graduating teams—Iceman/Slider, Hollywood/Wolfman, and Maverick—are ordered to report to Enterprise. (Viper, to bolster Maverick's confidence, offers to fly as his RIO if no one else can be found; ultimately, Cougar's ex-RIO Merlin takes Maverick's back seat.) An intelligence-gathering ship has 'broken down' inside hostile waters and the pilots are to fly cover for it until repairs are completed, with the other two teams in the air and Maverick as back-up on Ready Five. While Hollywood and Iceman are on patrol, six MiGs ambush them, downing Hollywood's craft (the crew safely ejects) and damaging Iceman's. When Maverick reaches the dogfight, he inadvertently flies through a MiG-28's jet wash and starts spinning out of control—circumstances identical to those that caused Goose's death. Though he manages to recover, his confidence is gone and he flees the scene. (The Enterprise cannot launch additional craft due to its catapults being "broken.") Clutching Goose's dog tags and begging his friend to speak to him one last time, Maverick finds his courage. He re-engages the enemy and downs three MiGs while covering Iceman (who scores a single kill of his own), employing both team thinking as well as his signature high-risk flying style. Returning to Enterprise as a hero, Maverick is given his choice of any posting, and he decides to return to Miramar as an instructor, much to Stinger's amusement. On Maverick's return to Fightertown USA, he goes for a drink in the local bar when "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" starts playing on the jukebox. Charlie appears, and the two rekindle their romance as the movie closes.

Production

Background

The primary inspiration for the film was an article, Top Guns by Ehud Yonay in the May 1983 issue of California magazine, which also featured aerial photography by then-Lieutenant Commander Charles "Heater" Heatley. [1] The article detailed the TOPGUN fighter pilots at the Miramar Naval Air Station, located in San Diego, self-nicknamed as "Fightertown USA". Numerous screenwriters allegedly turned down the project.[2] Bruckheimer and Simpson went on to hire Jim Cash and Jack Epps, Jr., to write the first draft. The research methods, by Epps, included an attendance at several declassified Top Gun classes at Miramar and gaining experience by being flown in an F-14. The first draft failed to capture the imagination of Bruckheimer and Simpson, and the first draft is considered to be very different from the final product in numerous ways.[2]

The producers wanted the assistance of the United States Navy in production of the film. The US Navy was influential in relation to script approval, which saw changes being made; the opening dogfight was moved to international waters as opposed to Cuba, salty language was trimmed down, and a scene that involved a crash on the deck of an aircraft carrier was also scrapped.[3] Also, Maverick's love interest in the film was originally intended to be a female enlisted member of the Navy, but due to the US Department of Defense prohibition of fraternization between officer and enlisted personnel, her position was changed to be that of an outside contractor.[3]

Other changes included the introduction of the semi-fictional Top Gun trophy (there had been an inter-service air-to-air gunnery competition in the 1940s and 50s; but it is defunct, as the Navy discourages competitive flying). There were also concerns that the lead female was not appropriate and was a stereotype; subsequently changes were made to the lead female character, Charlotte "Charlie" Blackwood. She was loosely based on the real-life Christine H. Fox, a mathematician, who at the time was a representative of the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) at NAS Miramar. She briefed air crew members for multiple types of aircraft prior to a series of exercises known by the name Hey, Rube!. She was later appointed as the President of CNA in March, 2004.[4], [5]

Cast

Aircraft

Enlarge picture
A formation of F-14A Tomcats of Fighter Squadrons VF-51 Screaming Eagles and VF-111 Sundowners, and F-5E/F Tiger II's of the Navy Fighter Weapons School. Note the ficticious markings on the tail of at least one of the F-14's.
  • F-14 Tomcat. The major US aircraft featured in the movie and, at the time, was the Navy's primary Air superiority fighter.
  • A-4 Skyhawk. Also called "Scooter", this small attack aircraft is used to simulate subsonic Russian aircraft such as the MiG-17.
  • F-5E and F-5F Tiger II. This aircraft was intended as a low cost supersonic fighter for allies which could not afford the best US fighters. The F-5 was used by the Navy to simulate the supersonic MiG-21 in dissimilar training because of its similar flight characteristics, and difficult to spot small size in comparison with the much larger Tomcat. In the movie F-5s are painted black to depict the fictional MiG-28 (some of which kept this fictional paint scheme after filming while flying at the real Top Gun school).
  • The film also features US Navy Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King and US Coast Guard HH-3F Pelican helicopters conducting search and rescue operations.

Music

Further information: Top Gun (soundtrack)
The Top Gun soundtrack is one of the most popular soundtracks to date. Harold Faltermeyer, who previously worked with both Jerry Bruckheimer and Don Simpson on the films Flashdance and Beverly Hills Cop, was sent the script of Top Gun by Bruckheimer before filming began. Giorgio Moroder and Tom Whitlock worked on numerous songs including "Take My Breath Away" and "Danger Zone". Kenny Loggins had two songs on the soundtrack; "Playing with the Boys", and Danger Zone. Berlin recorded the song "Take My Breath Away", which would later win numerous awards, sending Berlin to international acclaim. After the release of Loggins' "Danger Zone", sales of the album exploded, selling 7 million in the United States alone. On the re-release of the soundtrack in 2000, two songs that had been omitted from the original album, "Great Balls of Fire" by Jerry Lee Lewis and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" by The Righteous Brothers, were added. However, no soundtrack release to date has included the Faltermeyer score (apart from the Memories and Top Gun Anthem pieces.)

Other artists were considered for the soundtrack project, but did not participate. Bryan Adams was considered as a potential candidate, but refused to participate because he felt the film glorified war.[6] Likewise, REO Speedwagon was considered, but backed down because they would not be allowed to record their own composition.

Fatal accident during filming

Renowned aerobatic pilot Art Scholl, 53, was hired to do in-flight camera work for the film. The original script called for an inverted flat spin which he was to perform and capture on an onboard camera. Scholl entered the spin, but was unable to recover from it and crashed his Pitts S-2 in to the Pacific Ocean off the Southern California coast. The cause of the accident remains unknown.

Top Gun was dedicated to the memory of Art Scholl.

MiG-28 goofs

There are two goofs involving the MiG-28. Mikoyan aircraft models are named in odd numbers, so there could never be a MiG-28. And the MiG-28s are clearly identifiable as F-5 Tigers. The numbering, however, guaranteed that there would not be a real MiG-28 to confuse anyone, and a line of dialogue was added to indicate that F-5s and MiG-28s were very similar.

Reception

The film opened in the United States in 1,028 cinemas on May 16, 1986. On its first weekend, it came in at number one with a $8,193,052 gross, and went on to a total domestic figure of $176,786,701. Internationally it took in $177,030,000 for a worldwide box office total of $353,816,701.[4] The film was highly praised for the action sequences. Roger Ebert said of the film; "The dogfights are absolutely the best since Clint Eastwood's electrifying aerial scenes in Firefox.".[5]

Top Gun went on to break further records in the then still-developing home video market. Backed by a massive $8 million marketing campaign including a Top Gun-themed Pepsi commercial, the advanced demand was such that the film became the best-selling videocassette in the industry's history on pre-orders alone. Top Gun's home video success was again reflected by strong DVD sales, which were furthered by a special-edition release in 2004. Bomber jacket sales increased and Ray Ban 'Aviator' sunglasses jumped 40%, due to their use by characters in the film.[6] The movie also boosted Air Force and Navy recruitment. This was evident in the fact that the Navy used its success by having recruitment booths in some theaters to lure enthusiastic patrons.[7] Despite the fact that they used the film as an informal marketing tool, real Navy fighter pilots that saw it ridiculed the film, citing numerous inaccuracies. Several said that if they'd done any of the things that the main character did, e.g., refusing to land when low on fuel, flying at high speed by air control towers, they'd have faced a court-martial and prison time and at the very least, probably would've been kicked out of the Navy.

The AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movie Quotes list had the line "I feel the need — the need for speed!" from Top Gun on the list.

Awards and nominations

The film won the following awards:

Year Award Category - Recipient(s)
1987ASCAP Film and Television Music AwardMost Performed Songs from Motion Pictures - Giorgio Moroder and Tom Whitlock for the song "Take My Breath Away".
1987Academy AwardBest Music, Original Song - Giorgio Moroder (music) and Tom Whitlock (lyrics) for the song "Take My Breath Away".
1986Apex Scroll AwardAchievement in Sound Effects
1987BRIT AwardBest Soundtrack
1987Golden GlobeBest Original Song - Motion Picture - Giorgio Moroder (music) and Tom Whitlock (lyrics)for the song "Take My Breath Away".
1987Golden Screen
1987Grammy AwardsBest Pop Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group or Soloist) - Harold Faltermeyer and Steve Stevens for "Top Gun Anthem".
1987Motion Picture Sound Editors Golden Reel AwardBest Sound Editing
Best Sound Editing - Sound Effects
1987People's Choice AwardFavorite Motion Picture
1988Award of the Japanese AcademyBest Foreign Language Film
1993GLAAD Rainbow Awards FestivalGayest Movie of the 1980s


The film was nominated for the following awards:
  • Academy Award (1987)
  • Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing - Cecelia Hall and George Watters II
  • Best Film Editing - Billy Weber and Chris Lebenzon
  • Best Sound - Donald O. Mitchell, Kevin O'Connell, Rick Kline and William B. Kaplan
  • Apex Scroll Awards (1986)
  • Actress in a Supporting Role- Meg Ryan
  • Film Editing - Billy Weber and Chris Lebenzon
  • Best Original Song - Motion Picture - Giorgio Moroder (music) and Tom Whitlock (lyrics) for the song "Take My Breath Away".
  • Achievement in Compilation Soundtrack
  • Achievement in Sound
  • Golden Globe (1988)
  • Best Original Score - Motion Picture - Harold Faltermeyer
  • Award of the Japanese Academy (1988)
  • Best Foreign Language Film
  • Fennecus Awards (1986)
  • Achievement in Compilation Soundtrack
  • Best Original Song - Motion Picture - Giorgio Moroder (music) and Tom Whitlock (lyrics) for the song "Take My Breath Away".
  • Film Editing - Billy Weber and Chris Lebenzon
  • Achievement in Sound
  • Achievement in Sound Effects

Video games

Main article: Top Gun (video game)


Top Gun also spawned a number of video games for various platforms. The original game was released in 1987 under the same title as the film. It was released on five platforms in total: PC, Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC and Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) (with an equivalent version for Nintendo's "VS." arcade cabinets). In the game, the player pilots an F-14 Tomcat fighter, and has to complete four missions. A sequel, Top Gun: The Second Mission, was released for the NES three years later.

Another game, Top Gun: Fire at Will, was released in 1996 for the PC and later for the Sony PlayStation platform. Top Gun: Hornet's Nest was released in 1996. was released for PlayStation 2 in 2001 and was ported to the Nintendo Game Cube and Windows PCs a year later. Combat Zones was considerably longer and more complex than its predecessors, and also featured other aircrafts besides the F-14. In late 2005, a fifth game, simply titled Top Gun, was released for the Nintendo DS.

Mobile Game Publisher Hands-On Mobile (formerly knows as Mforma) have published three mobile games based around Top Gun. The first two were top-down scrolling arcade shooters. The third game takes a different approach as a third-person perspective game, similar to Sega's 'Afterburner' games.

Use by the Military

Somewhat ironically, since the movie is about naval aviation, incoming Cadets at the United States Air Force Academy are shown the introductory scene depicting Maverick guiding Cougar back to the carrier in defiance of the ship's captain. The moral dilemma presented in the scene is used to illustrate the necessity to follow the chain of command in all situations.

References in popular culture

The success of Top Gun has seen it have a cultural influence in society which has spawned many references, some of which lampoon the film:
  • The most notorious of these was the 1991 film Hot Shots!. The spoof film primarily makes fun of Top Gun, following the protagonist Topper Harley played by Charlie Sheen, an American fighter pilot who must overcome the ghosts of his father and return to duty for a special assignment.
  • Top Gun has often been referred to as a homoerotic film. The romantic comedy Sleep with Me (1994) includes a sequence in which a character, played by Quentin Tarantino, describes in detail his theory that Top Gun has a gay subtext. That sequence was written by Roger Avary. Many people, particularly sports commentator Jim Rome, reference the scene where Maverick, Goose, Iceman and Slider all play beach volleyball in particular.
  • In an episode of The Simpsons, the family goes to an air show, and a geeky teenager tells them where to park. Bart yells, "Way to guard the parking lot, Top Gun!". Later on, Col. Leslie Hapablab asks the audience "Anybody out there have the need for speed?"
  • In an episode of the Canadian comedy Corner Gas, one Snowbird pilot says to another, "Let it go, Iceman".
  • In Origin Systems's Wing Commander series, character Christopher Blair's call sign was originally intended to be "Falcon", but was later changed to "Maverick" as an homage to Top Gun. In addition, the character Maj. Michael Casey went by the call sign "Iceman".
  • In the space-combat simulation Starlancer, by Wing Commander creator Chris Roberts and his post-Origin company Digital Anvil, several members of the 45th Volunteers, the player's fighter wing, have callsigns referencing Top Gun: Viper, Cougar, and the player character's co-pilot, "Moose."
  • The satirical newspaper The Onion listed inaccuracies from the movie Pearl Harbor, one of which was, "Maverick, Goose and Iceman were not actually at Pearl Harbor". Jerry Bruckheimer was a producer for both films.
  • In an episode of JAG, main character Harmon Rabb Jr. is being held at gunpoint by gang members, one of whom keeps addressing him as "Top Gun." Harm is a Navy F-14 pilot like Maverick.
  • In another episode, the character of Admiral Chegwidden tells Harmon Rabb that his record is something of a cross between Top Gun and A Few Good Men; both movies starred Tom Cruise.
  • The film Meet the Parents references the call-signs of Maverick, Iceman, and Goose when two of the characters are congratulating each other after scoring in a game of pool volleyball.
  • The film Valiant, a 2005 animation, sampled the Kenny Loggins track "Danger Zone" in one of its trailers. The film is about a pigeon who overcomes his small size to become a hero in the air force.
  • The Chinese-American bowler Michael Chang went by the name of "Iceman" on overhead scoreboards in his amateur career, reportedly because his fans claimed he was at his best in close matches, especially in late-game situations in which his opponents would yield to pressure.
  • The band Bury Your Dead has also used the movie title as a name to one of their songs off their 2005 album Cover Your Tracks (all the songs are named after Tom Cruise movies).
  • is a roller coaster themed after the movie. It is located in Carowinds, and is one of the park's most popular rides. Other Top Gun-themed roller coasters are located in Kings Island, Canada's Wonderland and Great America.
  • In the video game , the player can earn an aviation rank by logging many flight hours. Some of the various ranks are from the movie, such as "Goose" and "Maverick."
  • In the video game World of Warcraft, there are six wind riders/gryphon riders (aerial soldiers) named "Guse", "Mulverick", "Jeztor", "Ichman", "Slidore" and "Vipore" inside of the Alterac Valley zone.
  • Val Kilmer hosted the December 9, 2000 episode of Saturday Night Live reprising his role of his "Top Gun" character Tom "Iceman" Kazanski in a segment titled "Iceman: The Later Years". The comedy sketch runs with the notion of Iceman as an airline captain after performing his duties as a Naval Aviator.
Enlarge picture
CD cover of Will Young's single, "Switch It On", which spoofs Top Gun.
  • British singer Will Young's "Switch It On" single CD cover parodies Top Gun. The font in which the title is written parodies that of the film logo, and Young is dressed in flight gear standing right outside of a jet fighter. His helmet even has the VF-1 designation on it, just like Goose's from the movie. The music video for "Switch It On" is dubbed "Hot Gun" and parodies several scenes from the film.
  • In Blizzard's PC game Starcraft, there is a hero Wraith pilot by the name of Tom Kazansky, obvious homage to Tom "Iceman" Kazanski.
  • In the 2005 film Waiting, Monty (Ryan Reynolds) tries to coax Dean (Justin Long) into telling him his thoughts by using the Top Gun quote "Talk to me, Goose".
  • In Marvel Comics' adaptation of the Television Series Captain Planet (issue #3), three pilots are seen chasing a large dragon formed from smog; their callsigns are Iceman, Maverick, and Goose.
  • In the "Slutty Pumpkin" episode of How I Met Your Mother, Barney dresses up in a Top Gun flight suit for Halloween and refers to Ted as Maverick with a direct quote from the movie, and also plays Danger Zone before he enters the apartment.
  • On the popular social-networking website Facebook.com, the quote on the bottom of "My Friends" link reads "Too close for missiles, I'm switching to guns", an echo of Iceman's line during the training engagement that leads to Goose's death. At the bottom of Facebook's "Social Timeline" feature, the Air Boss's often-ignored response to Maverick's request for a fly-by, "Negative, ghostrider, the pattern is full", appears as well.
  • In an episode of DuckTales entitled "Top Duck", Launchpad McQuack tries to prove himself as a pilot to his family.
  • In Unreal Tournament 2004, if you shoot down a raptor using another raptor's anti-air missile, you get an award called "Top Gun."
  • In the audio commentary on the Revenge of the Nerds "Panty Raid" DVD, Robert Carradine refers to Anthony Edwards as "Goose."
  • In the video game Airforce Delta Strike from the Konami Airforce Delta series, there are 3 pilots that have the callsigns Maverick 1, 2, and 3, who fly the F-14 Tomcat in one mission.
  • In Family Guy season-five episode "Airport '07", the Top Gun Anthem can be heard while Peter is in his "flying truck" fantasy and while flying upside-down, approaches an enemy fighter pilot and takes a picture of him as Goose did at the beginning of the film.
  • My Life In Film, a BBC comedy show that has episodes following the plot of major movies, also had an episode based on Top Gun. The pilot training school was replaced with driving school, and had scenes (pared to a 30min running time) that were basically the same as the movie.
  • In the FedEx ad titled "Carpet" the warehouse tourguide radio's to a worker "Goose this is Iceman, we've got a wild bird," referring to a flying carpet that is getting away. (http://www.fedex.com/us/about/unitedstates/advertising/tvads/player1.html?link=4)
  • In the 8th episode of the HBO TV Series: Flight of the Conchords, one of the main characters compares aspects of daily life to the film in many parts of the episode.
  • In a 2005 Top Gear episode (Bugatti Veyron vs plane), Jeremy Clarkson reffers to Richard Hammond and James May as Maverick and Iceman.

See also

Historical incidents similar to those in the film's climax: Similar films

References

1. ^ Roth, Alex. "down Cunningham's legend", The San Diego Union-Tribune, 2006-01-15, p. A-1. Retrieved on 2006-02-19. 
2. ^ Special Edition DVD, Interview with Jack Epps
3. ^ Special Edition DVD, Interview with the producers
4. ^ boxofficemojo.com. Top Gun (box office). Retrieved on 8 November 2006.
5. ^ rogerebert.com. Sun Times:Top Gun review. Retrieved on 15 January 2006.
6. ^ time.com. Through A Glass Darkly. Retrieved on 8 November 2006.

External links

Anthony D. L. "Tony" Scott (born July 21, 1944) is a British film director. His films include Top Gun and True Romance. He is the brother of director Ridley Scott.
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Donald Clarence Simpson (October 29, 1943 - January 19, 1996) was an American film producer. He is known for such hits as Flashdance, Beverly Hills Cop, Top Gun and The Rock.
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Jerry Bruckheimer

Birth name Jerome Leon Bruckheimer
Born September 21 1945 (1945--) (age 62)
Detroit, Michigan

Nationality American


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Jim Cash (17 January 1941 – 25 March 2000) was a film writer, noted for writing such 1980s films such as Top Gun and The Secret of My Success. He was born in Boyne City, Michigan, USA), and later lived in Grand Rapids. He received a B.A.
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Tom Cruise

Birth name Thomas Cruise Mapother IV
Born July 3 1962 (1962--) (age 45)
Syracuse, New York

Years active 1981 - present

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Kelly McGillis

Birth name Kelly Ann McGillis
Born July 9 1957 (1957--) (age 50)
Newport Beach, California

Spouse(s) Boyd Black (1979-1981)
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Val Kilmer

Val Kilmer in 2005
Birth name Val Edward Kilmer
Born November 31 1959 (1959--) (age 49)
Los Angeles, California
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Anthony Edwards

Anthony Edwards in the Tower Terrace Suites, at the 2002 Indianapolis 500.
Birth name Anthony Charles Planck Edwards
Born July 19 1962 (1962--)
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Tom Skerritt

Tom Skerritt at the 47th Emmy Awards
Birth name Thomas Roy Skerritt
Born July 25 1933 (1933--) (age 74)
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
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Harold Faltermeyer (born October 5, 1952 in Munich) is a German musician, keyboardist, composer and record producer.

He is recognized as one of the composers/producers who best captured the zeitgeist of 1980s synth-pop in film scores.
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Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. Films are produced by recording images from the world with cameras, or by creating images using animation techniques or special effects.
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Anthony D. L. "Tony" Scott (born July 21, 1944) is a British film director. His films include Top Gun and True Romance. He is the brother of director Ridley Scott.
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Donald Clarence Simpson (October 29, 1943 - January 19, 1996) was an American film producer. He is known for such hits as Flashdance, Beverly Hills Cop, Top Gun and The Rock.
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Paramount Pictures Corporation

Subsidiary
Founded Los Angeles, California, USA (1912)
Headquarters Los Angeles, California, USA

Key people Brad Grey, Chairman and CEO
Frederick D. Huntsberry, COO

Industry Motion pictures
Revenue $3.
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Tom Cruise

Birth name Thomas Cruise Mapother IV
Born July 3 1962 (1962--) (age 45)
Syracuse, New York

Years active 1981 - present

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Kelly McGillis

Birth name Kelly Ann McGillis
Born July 9 1957 (1957--) (age 50)
Newport Beach, California

Spouse(s) Boyd Black (1979-1981)
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Anthony Edwards

Anthony Edwards in the Tower Terrace Suites, at the 2002 Indianapolis 500.
Birth name Anthony Charles Planck Edwards
Born July 19 1962 (1962--)
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Val Kilmer

Val Kilmer in 2005
Birth name Val Edward Kilmer
Born November 31 1959 (1959--) (age 49)
Los Angeles, California
Died


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Tom Skerritt

Tom Skerritt at the 47th Emmy Awards
Birth name Thomas Roy Skerritt
Born July 25 1933 (1933--) (age 74)
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
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Michael Ironside

Michael Ironside as Seevis in Stargate SG-1
Birth name Frederick Reginald Ironside
Born January 12 1950 (1950--) (age 57)
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Tim Robbins

Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001
Birth name Timothy Francis Robbins
Born September 16 1958 (1958--) (age 49)
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Meg Ryan

Birth name Margaret Mary Emily Hyra
Born November 19 1961 (1961--) (age 47)
Fairfield, Connecticut

Years active 1981 - present

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20th century - 21st century
1950s  1960s  1970s  - 1980s -  1990s  2000s  2010s
1982 1983 1984 - 1985 - 1986 1987 1988

Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar).
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Art Scholl (24 December 1931 - 16 September 1985) was a renowned American aerobatic pilot, aerial cameraman, flight instructor and educator based in Southern California. He died during filming of Top Gun
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2007 September >>
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
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2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30

September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days.
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