Tree climbing

Tree climbing consists of ascending and moving around in the canopy of trees.

Tree climbing is safe when done with the proper training and equipment. Use of a rope, helmet, and harness are the minimum requirements to ensure the safety of the climber. Other equipment can also be used depending on the experience and skill of the tree climber. Some tree climbers take special hammocks called "Treeboats" with them into the tree canopies where they can enjoy a picnic or nap, or spend the night.

Tree climbing is an "on rope" activity that employs a mixture of techniques and gear derived from rock climbers, cave explorers, loggers and professional arborists. Modern tree climbing techniques are a derivative of these other activities.

History

Tree climbing is pioneered largely by environmentalists at the beginning of the Eighties in the USA. Now there are many Organizations around the world that promote tree climbing.

Ethic

Tree climbing is non-invasive, in that, a "leave no trace" ethic is practiced by tree climbers.

Technique

Many different techniques are used to climb trees depending on the climbers individual style, purpose and preferences, as well as, the type of tree and difficulty of the climb. The difficulty of any particular climb depends on many factors; the regularity of branching, the brittleness of dead wood in some species, whether the bark is rough or smooth, the width of the trunk and branches, the height of the tree, the location of the tree and the weather are all factors.
  • The simplest technique of climbing a tree, if the tree allows for it, is free solo climbing, wherein the climber climbs the tree itself without the use of a rope or ladder. This type of climbing is not recommended, especially on trees that are particularly tall or difficult to climb, because of the inherent risk of falling.
  • The main techniques used are free climbing, self-belayed climbing with a doubled rope system, Single Rope Technique, lead climbing, and spiking up with climbing gaffs. A climber can use several different techniques over the course of a climb, choosing the best method for the moment. The first obstacle is getting into the tree, which demands either employing techniques of aid climbing such as ascending a fixed rope, ladder or etrier, or else free climbing up limbs or other structures into the tree.
  • The "double rope technique" is used to self belay the climber in such a way that the rope can be retrieved without going back up the tree. One end of the rope is fastened to the climber's saddle (harness), from there the rope passes around the tree and back to a friction hitch which is also attached to the climber. This system allows the climber to easily adjust the rope to provide a belay if free climbing, or to go up or down if hanging on the rope. As long as there is minimal slack in the system, any fall will be restrained.
  • A climber may employ the techniques of lead climbing, where points of protection are formed by girthing the tree's limbs with slings. Once the lead climber ascends the tree, he or she may create a belay or top rope anchor or else simply rappel down. In the event that an anchor is created, other climbers can subsequently climb the tree on belay without having to lead. Drawbacks to this method include the probability of hitting a lower limb or the main trunk in the event of a fall. Due to this risk, climbers typically wear climbing helmets.
  • Single Rope Technique is used mainly for getting to the top of large trees which cannot be easily free climbed. With the adequate hardware, a throw line, an attached weight, and a launching system (e.g., a bow or slingshot), a climbing rope can be anchored to a branch very high in the tree. This is done by launching the weight (with the throw line attached) over the desired limb and tying the climbing rope to the unweighted end. The climbing rope is then hauled over the branch by pulling on the throw line. The line is anchored to the trunk or to the high limb itself by running one end through a closed bight made in the other end. The climber then ascends the rope using a set of friction hitchs or mechanical ascenders) to obtain the desired limb. With practice this method is typically fastest and requires the least amount of hardware. One drawback is that it does not necessarily involve directly ascending the tree itself, as the vast majority of the time spent climbing is ascending the rope, and not the tree itself. Additionally, it is typically not as safe as other methods, as the climber must trust without prior inspection a single branch high in the tree for the duration of the ascent.

See also

External links

rope (IPA: /rəʊp/) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. It has tensile strength but is too flexible to provide compressive strength (i.e.
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helmet is a form of protective gear worn on the head. Traditionally, helmets have been made of metal. In recent decades helmets made from resin or plastic and typically reinforced with Aramid fiber (e.g. Twaron or Kevlar) have become preferred for most applications.
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Harness may refer to:
  • Safety harness
  • Child harness, for walking with small children
  • Harness (comics), a villain in the the Marvel Comics universe
In sport:
  • Climbing harness, used in rock-climbing and abseiling
  • Windsurfing harness

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arborist (or tree surgeon) is a professional in the practice of arboriculture, the management and maintenance of trees. Work may also include care of shrubs, vines, and other perennial woody plants. An arborist is distinct from a forester, or from a logger.
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Free solo climbing — rock climbing with no safety equipment — is a rare and highly dangerous extreme sport. Also known as free soloing, it is a form of free climbing where the climber (the free soloist
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single rope technique (SRT) is a set of methods used to descend and ascend vertical ropes. SRT is used in caving, potholing, rock climbing, rope rescue, roped access for building maintenance and by arborists for tree climbing.
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Lead climbing is a climbing technique used to ascend a route. This technique is predominantly used in rock climbing and involves a lead climber attaching themselves to a length of rope and ascending a route whilst periodically attaching protection to the face of the route
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Aid climbing is a style of climbing in which fixed or placed protection is used to make upward progress. In the Yosemite Decimal System used in the US, it is sometimes called "6th class" climbing.
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Free climbing is the most common style of rock climbing, in which the climber uses no artificial aids to make upwards progress. In this way, the climber will use only hands, feet and other parts of the body.
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A friction hitch is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. These knots are commonly used in Single Rope Technique while climbing to ascend a hanging rope by alternately hanging on one friction hitch and sliding the other up.
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Lead climbing is a climbing technique used to ascend a route. This technique is predominantly used in rock climbing and involves a lead climber attaching themselves to a length of rope and ascending a route whilst periodically attaching protection to the face of the route
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As a nautical term, belaying refers to making a line fast to a cleat, pin or other fixed object. In climbing, it refers to the practice of controlling the rope fed out to a climber.
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Top-rope climbing (or Top roping) is a technique in climbing in which the rope runs from the belayer at the foot of the route through one or more carabiners connected to an anchor at the top of the route and back down to the climber [1] .
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Rock climbing
  • Climbing
  • History
  • Climbing system
  • Climbing techniques
  • Abseiling
  • Grade


Abseiling (from the German: abseilen, "to rope down") is the process of descending on a fixed rope.
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single rope technique (SRT) is a set of methods used to descend and ascend vertical ropes. SRT is used in caving, potholing, rock climbing, rope rescue, roped access for building maintenance and by arborists for tree climbing.
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A bow is an ancient weapon that fires arrows powered by the elasticity of the bow.
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slingshot is a small hand-powered projectile weapon. It has a pocket for holding the projectile. Each end of the pocket is attached to a rubber band, which is attached to the ends of a fork-shaped frame. There are steel hunting balls for slingshots that can kill small game.
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bight is used in knot tying to refer to any curved section, slack part, or loop between the two ends of a rope, string, or yarn.[1] An important concept, the term is used extensively in the description of knots and the discourse of knotting and related subjects.
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A friction hitch is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. These knots are commonly used in Single Rope Technique while climbing to ascend a hanging rope by alternately hanging on one friction hitch and sliding the other up.
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A Jumar is a mechanical device for ascending on a rope, named after the Swiss factory 'Jümar', and is more generically known as an ascender. The device's name also leads to the term Jumaring for the process of using such a device.
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Climbing is the activity of using one's hands or feet to ascend a steep object. It is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment) and professionally, as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure, or military operations.
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Caving is the recreational sport of exploring caves. Speleology is the scientific study of caves and the cave environment.[1]

The challenges of the sport depend on the cave being visited, but often include the negotiation of pitches, squeezes, and water
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arborist (or tree surgeon) is a professional in the practice of arboriculture, the management and maintenance of trees. Work may also include care of shrubs, vines, and other perennial woody plants. An arborist is distinct from a forester, or from a logger.
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