Utah English

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Utah English, sometimes humorously referred to as "Utahnics", is a dialect of the English language spoken in the U.S. state of Utah. Influences are as varied as ancestries of its immigrants, from Scottish to Mexican Spanish. Since the field of sociolinguistics is relatively new to academia, very little research has been done on the dialect. However, a research team at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah has begun a comparative project on the topic.[1]

Distinctions of the dialect

Vowel shifts

  • The merger of /ɑr/ and /ɔr/, such that "born" may be pronounced "barn" and the town of "American Fork" becomes "American Fark." This also takes place among older speakers in St. Louis.
  • "egg," "leg," "measure," "treasure," and similar words pronounced with the "ay" sound of "hay," rather than the "eh" sound of "wet."

Introduction, removal, and morphing of stops and plosives

  • Introduction of a "T" into certain words: "teacher" pronounced "teat-chur;" "preacher" as "preat-chur;" other examples include between the sounds "L" and "S" ("Nelson" and "Wilson" pronounced as "Neltson" and "Wiltson").
  • Shortening of some words from several syllables to one or two (different from general consonant cluster reduction): "corral" as "crall", "probably" to "probly," "prolly," or "pry."
  • Removal of the hard T sounds in the middle of words and replacement of them with glottal stops. Layton is /leɪʔun/. Mountain to /maʊʔun/. This happens in most American dialects.

Changes

The unique pronunciations of the dialect, as is typical of American accents, are most marked in the speech of rural and older residents. Much of the state continues to move towards the General American accent (due in large part to immigration and technological/communication advances within the last fifty years, specifically the ubiquity of the television).

Sample Vocabulary

  • Borrow Pit = General American "Ditch" I almost drove in to the borrow pit.
  • Jockey Box = General American "Glove Box" / Hand me a tissue out of the jockey box.
  • Spinnin' Brodies = General American "Doing Doughnuts" (i.e. to make a circle in the dirt with your tires) / He was spinnin' brodies in the driveway in his new truck.
  • Fer = an intensifier. the longer the word following "fer" the more intense. / That blouse is fer cuuute!.
  • Sluff = General American "Ditch School" or "Play Hookey" / I sluffed a lot of classes in high school.

Notes

1. ^ [1]

References



A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the language's speakers.
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English}}} 
Writing system: Latin (English variant) 
Official status
Official language of: 53 countries
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: en
ISO 639-2: eng
ISO 639-3: eng  
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Motto
"In God We Trust"   (since 1956)
"E Pluribus Unum"   ("From Many, One"; Latin, traditional)
Anthem
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State of Utah

Flag of Utah Seal
Nickname(s): Beehive State
Motto(s): "Industry"

Official language(s) English

Capital Salt Lake City
Largest city Salt Lake City

Area
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Sociolinguistics is the study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context on the way language is used. Sociolinguistics overlaps to a considerable degree with pragmatics.
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Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church).

About 98% of the students at BYU are Mormon and two-thirds of the students come from outside the state of Utah.
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Provo, Utah

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Motto:
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Utah
County Utah
Area
 - City  41.8 sq mi (108.
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General American (sometimes called Standard Midwestern, Standard Spoken American English or American Broadcast English) is the accent of American English perceived by Americans to be most "neutral" and free of regional characteristics.
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All Things Considered

Genre News: analysis, commentary, features, interviews, specials
Running time 105 min. weekdays;
50 min. weekends
Country  United States

Home station National Public Radio

Host(s)
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National Public Radio

Type Public radio network
First air date April 1971
Country  United States
Availability    Global
Founded 1970
Owner National Public Radio, Inc.
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This is a list of varieties of the English language. Dialects are varieties differing in pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar from each other and from Standard English (which may itself be considered a dialect).
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English}}} 
Writing system: Latin (English variant) 
Official status
Official language of: 53 countries
Regulated by: no official regulation
Language codes
ISO 639-1: en
ISO 639-2: eng
ISO 639-3: eng  
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Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. Physically and geologically, Europe is the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, west of Asia. Europe is bounded to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea,
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British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world.
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Received Pronunciation (RP) is a form of pronunciation of the English language which has been long perceived as uniquely prestigious amongst British accents.

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The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. It is also often used in reference to the "cockney accent.
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English language in England refers to the English language as spoken in England, part of the United Kingdom. In English-speaking countries outside the United Kingdom, the term "British English" is more frequently used for this variety of English.
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Estuary English is a name given to the formulation(s) of English widely spoken in South East England and the East of England; especially along the River Thames and its estuary, which is where the two regions meet.
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Guernsey English is the dialect of English spoken by natives of the Bailiwick of Guernsey, distinguished by the fact that it has considerable influence from Dgèrnésiais, the variety of Norman indigenous to Guernsey.
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Mid Ulster English is the dialect of most people in the traditional province of Ulster in Ireland, including those in the two main cities. It represents a cross-over area between Ulster Scots and Hiberno-English.
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East Midlands English was a dialect traditionally spoken in those parts of Mercia lying East of Watling Street (the A5 London - Shrewsbury Road). Today this area is represented by the counties of the East Midlands of England, (Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire,
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West Midlands English is a group of dialects of the English language. The traditional Black Country dialect preserves many archaic traits of Early Modern English and even Middle English, and can be very confusing for outsiders. Thee, Thy and Thou are still in use.
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Northern English is a group of dialects of the English language. It includes Northumbrian, which is more similar in some respects to Scots. Among the other dialects are Cumbrian, Tyke (Yorkshire dialect) and Scouse.
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Scouse is the accent and dialect of English found in the north-western English city of Liverpool and in some adjoining urban areas of Merseyside. The Scouse accent is highly distinctive and sounds wholly different from the accents used in the neighbouring regions of Cheshire and
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Scottish English is usually taken to mean the standard form of the English language used in Scotland, often termed Scottish Standard English[1][2]. It is the language normally used in formal, non-fiction written texts in Scotland.
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Glasgow patter or Glaswegian is a dialect spoken in and around Glasgow, Scotland. Glasgow patter has evolved over the centuries amongst the working classes, Irish immigrants and passing seamen in the dockyards.
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Highland English is the variety of Scottish English spoken by many in the Scottish Highlands, more heavily influenced by Gaelic than most other Scottish English dialects. Island English is the variety spoken as a second language by native Gaelic speakers in the Outer Hebrides.
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