Vierzehnheiligen

Enlarge picture
Fourteen Holy Helpers
The Fourteen Holy Helpers are a group of saints venerated together in Roman Catholicism because prayer to them was thought to be particularly effective, especially against various diseases. This group of Nothelfer ("helpers in need") originated in the 14th century at first in the Rhineland, largely as a result of the epidemic (probably of bubonic plague) that became known as the Black Death.

At the heart of the Fourteen were three virgin martyrs:

Sankt Margaretha mit dem Wurm,
Sankt Barbara mit dem Turm,
Sankt Katharina mit dem Radl,
das sind die heiligen drei Madl.


("Saint Margaret with the dragon; Saint Barbara with the tower; Saint Katharine with the wheel; those are the three holy maids.")

The Fourteen saints are: For one or another of the saints in the original set, Anthony the Anchorite, Leonard of Noblac, Nicholas, Sebastian, Oswald the King, Pope Sixtus II, Apollonia, Wolfgang of Regensburg or Roch were sometimes substituted.

While each has a separate feast day, the Fourteen Holy Helpers are honored together on August 8. Barbara, Catherine of Alexandria, Christopher, and Margaret of Antioch were dropped from the list of saints for universal veneration in the reform of the Roman Catholic liturgy in 1969 by Pope Paul VI. In 2004, Pope John Paul II reinstated the Feast of St Catherine of Alexandria, the voice to St. Joan of Arc, as an optional memorial on November 25.

The Vierzehnheiligen

Enlarge picture
Basilica Vierzehnheiligen
The fourteen holy helpers are honored in the Franconia section of Bavaria as the vierzehn Heiligen, to whom the Rococo pilgrimage church in the hamlet of Bad Staffelstein near Bamberg, designed by Balthasar Neumann (built –1774) is dedicated. On September 24, 1445 the Franciscan monastery’s young shepherd, Hermann Leicht, saw a crying child in a field—one that happened to belong to the nearby Cistercian monastery of Langheim. As he bent down to pick it up, it suddenly disappeared. A short time later, the child reappeared in the same spot and this time, two candles were burning next to it. In June 1446 the shepherd saw the child a third time, this time carrying a red cross on its chest and accompanied by thirteen children. The child said to the shepherd: ‘We are the 14 helpers and wish to erect a chapel here, where we can rest. If you will be our servant, we will be yours!’ Shortly after, the shepherd saw two burning candles descending to this spot. Soon, miraculous healings began, through the intervention of the fourteen helper saints.

The Cistercian brothers in the monastery erected a chapel, which immediately attracted pilgrims. An altar was consecrated as early as 1448. Pilgrimages to Vierzehnheiligen continue to take place each year between May and October.

The most famous group portrait of the "Fourteen Saints" is the altarpiece of 1503 painted by Matthias Grünewald for the monastery at Bindlach, near Bayreuth in Upper Franconia, the heartland of the Holy Helpers. As the cultus spread, Pope Nicholas V attached indulgences to devotion of the Fourteen Holy Helpers in the 16th century, though these no longer apply.

The "Fourteen angels" of the lost children's prayer in Engelbert Humperdinck's "fairy opera" Hansel und Gretel are the Fourteen Helpers. The English words are quite familiar:
"When at night I go to sleep,
Fourteen angels watch do keep,
Two my head are guarding,
Two my feet are guiding;
Two upon my right hand,
Two upon my left hand.
Two who warmly cover
Two who o'er me hover,
Two to whom 'tis given
To guide my steps to heaven."

See also

  • Kadaň, Czech Republic: Franciscan monastery with its pilgrimage church of Fourteen Holy Helpers.

External links

saint is one who is sanctified (cf. 2 Chron. 6:41). The early Christians were all called saints. (Heb. 13:24; Jud. 1:3; Phile. 1:5, 7) Over time, the traditional usage of the term saint
..... Click the link for more information.
Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints.

Among the Christian practices of the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, and some members of the Anglican Communion, veneration
..... Click the link for more information.
Christianity

Foundations
Jesus Christ
Church Theology
New Covenant Supersessionism
Dispensationalism
Apostles Kingdom Gospel
History of Christianity Timeline
Bible
Old Testament New Testament
Books Canon Apocrypha
..... Click the link for more information.
Prayer is the act of attempting to communicate, commonly with a sequence of words, with a deity or spirit for the purpose of worshiping, requesting guidance, requesting assistance, confessing sins, or to express one's thoughts and emotions.
..... Click the link for more information.
disease is an abnormal condition of an organism that impairs bodily functions. In human beings, "disease" is often used more broadly to refer to any condition that causes discomfort, dysfunction, distress, social problems, and/or death to the person afflicted, or similar problems
..... Click the link for more information.
14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400.

Events

  • The transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age
  • Beginning of the Ottoman Empire, early expansion into the Balkans

..... Click the link for more information.
The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany. After the collapse of the French Empire in the early 19th century, the German-speaking regions at the middle and lower course of the Rhine river
..... Click the link for more information.
In epidemiology, an epidemic (from Greek epi- upon + demos people) is a classification of a disease that appears as new cases in a given human population, during a given period, at a rate that substantially exceeds what is "expected," based on recent experience
..... Click the link for more information.
Bubonic Plague
Classification & external resources

Yersinia pestis'' seen at 2000x magnification with a fluorescent label. This bacterium, carried and spread by fleas, is the cause of the various forms of the disease plague.
ICD-10 A 20.
..... Click the link for more information.
Black Death, or The Black Plague, was one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. It began in South-western or Central Asia and spread to Europe by the late 1340s.
..... Click the link for more information.
In European folklore, a dragon is a serpentine legendary creature. The Latin word draco, as in the constellation Draco, comes directly from Greek δράκων, (drákōn, gazer).
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Agathius, also known as Achatius[1] or Acacius of Byzantium[5] was a Cappadocian centurion of the imperial army. He was arrested for his faith on charges by Tribune Firmus in Perinthus, Thrace, tortured, and then brought to Byzantium
..... Click the link for more information.
Headache
Classifications and external resources

ICD-10 R 51.
ICD-9 784.0

A headache (cephalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache.
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Barbara, known as the Great Martyr Barbara in the Orthodox church, was a Christian saint and martyr, who lived in the third century.

Her story

The hagiography of Saint Barbara says that she was born about 300 A.D. in Nicomedia, Bithynia in Asia Minor.
..... Click the link for more information.
Fever
Classifications and external resources

ICD-10 R 50.
ICD-9 780.6

DiseasesDB .htm 18924 |]

Fever (also known as pyrexia, or a febrile response from the Latin word febris
..... Click the link for more information.
Death is the permanent end of the life of a biological organism. Death may refer to the end of life as either an event or condition.[1] Many factors can cause or contribute to an organism's death, including predation, disease, habitat destruction, senescence,
..... Click the link for more information.
Bold text
Saint Blaise

Blaise confronting the Roman governor: scene from a stained glass window from the area of Soissons (Picardy, France), early 13th century.
Bishop and Martyr, Holy Helper
Born unknown, Armenia
Died ca.
..... Click the link for more information.
In anatomy, the throat is the part of the neck anterior to the vertebral column. It consists of the pharynx and larynx. An important feature of the throat is the epiglottis, a flap which separates the oesophagus from the trachea and prevents inhalation of food or drink.
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Catherine of Alexandria, also known as Saint Catherine of the Wheel and The Great Martyr Saint Catherine (Greek ἡ Ἁγία Αἰκατερίνη ἡ
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Christopher (Greek: Άγιος Χριστόφορος) was a saint venerated by Roman Catholics and Orthodox Christians, listed as a martyr killed in the reign of the 3rd century Roman emperor Decius
..... Click the link for more information.
Bubonic Plague
Classification & external resources

Yersinia pestis'' seen at 2000x magnification with a fluorescent label. This bacterium, carried and spread by fleas, is the cause of the various forms of the disease plague.
ICD-10 A 20.
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Cyriacus is a saint who lived under Roman Emperor Diocletian.

Personal life

A Roman nobleman, Cyriacus converted to Christianity during his adult life and renounced his material wealth, giving it away to the poor.
..... Click the link for more information.
temptation is an act that looks appealing to an individual. It is usually used to describe acts with negative connotations and as such, tends to lead a person to regret such actions, for various reasons: legal, social, psychological (including feeling guilt), health, economic, etc.
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Denis of Paris (also called Dionysius, Dennis, or Denys) is a Christian martyr and saint. In the third century, he was bishop of Paris. He was martyred in approximately 250, and is venerated especially in the Roman Catholic Church as patron of Paris,
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Erasmus of Formiae is a Christian saint and martyr who died ca. 303, also known as Saint Elmo. He is venerated as the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus or Elmo is also one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, saintly figures of Christian legend who were venerated especially in
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint Erasmus of Formiae is a Christian saint and martyr who died ca. 303, also known as Saint Elmo. He is venerated as the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus or Elmo is also one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, saintly figures of Christian legend who were venerated especially in
..... Click the link for more information.
In anatomy, the intestine is the segment of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.
..... Click the link for more information.
Eustace, also known as Eustachius or Eustathius, was a legendary Christian martyr who allegedly lived in the 2nd century AD.

Legend

Prior to his conversion to Christianity, he was a Roman general named Placidus, who served the emperor Trajan.
..... Click the link for more information.
Saint George (ca. 275-281–April 23, 303) was a soldier of the Roman Empire, from the then Greek-speaking Anatolia, now modern day Turkey, who was venerated as a Christian martyr.
..... Click the link for more information.
Domestication refers to the process whereby a population of animals or plants becomes accustomed to human provision and control. Humans have brought these populations under their care for a wide range of reasons: to produce food or valuable commodities (such as wool, cotton, or
..... Click the link for more information.


This article is copied from an article on Wikipedia.org - the free encyclopedia created and edited by online user community. The text was not checked or edited by anyone on our staff. Although the vast majority of the wikipedia encyclopedia articles provide accurate and timely information please do not assume the accuracy of any particular article. This article is distributed under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.