William Greenfield


William Greenfield
Archbishop of York
Birth nameWilliam Greenfield
EnthronedDecember 4, 1304
EndedDecember 6, 1315
PredecessorThomas of Corbridge
SuccessorWilliam Melton
DiedDecember 6, 1315
Cawood
BuriedYork Minster


William Greenfield (died 6 December 1315) served as both the Lord Chancellor of England and the Archbishop of York. He was also known as William of Greenfield.

Life

Greenfield was born in the eponymous Lincolnshire hamlet of Greenfield - but the date of his birth is now lost but we do know that he was related to a predecessor in the See, Archbishop Giffard - and it was Giffard that paid for the young Greenfield's Oxford education. in the year 1269 Giffard instructed that his bailiff at Churchdown (near Gloucester), "...to pay to Roger the miller of Oxford twenty shillings, for our kinsman William of Greenfield while he is studying there, because it would be difficult for us to send the money to him on account of the perils of the ways". After Oxford Greenfield studied in Paris, where he became a doctor of both civil and canon law. Giffard's brother was Bishop Godfrey Gifford - the Bishop of Worcester.

Greenfield was the first of a number of Archbishops who ruled the northern English Archiepiscopal diocese as well as being significant statesmen during the fourteenth century.

Before being made Archbishop he was variously:
  • Dean of Chichester,
  • Rector of Stratford-upon-Avon
  • Prebend of Ripon - where his stall was for a time sequestrated, on account of his non-residence - as at this time he was mainly occupied on affairs of state as a clerk and counsellor to Edward I
  • Temporal Chancellor of Durham
  • Chancellor of England (1302-1305).[1] On 30 September 1302 Greenfield received the custody of the great seal as chancellor at St. Radegund's (near Dover). During his absence in France, one Adam of Osgodby, then the Master of the Rolls, acted as his substitute.
  • Employed in the service of the State by King Edward I from 1290 onwards.

Election to the See of York

Greenfield was elected by the Chapter of York on the 4th December 1304; however there was delay in his consecration due to the death of Pope Benedict X; when finally consecrated it was by Clement V at Lyons, on the 30th January 1306.[2] Greenfield was strongly commended to the pope and cardinals by the King, who told them of his "...wisdom in council, industry, literary knowledge, and usefulness to the state".

Before his appointment Greenfield had lived for some time resident in Rome where the cost of his living and the procuring of the Papal assent were very heavy leaving Greenfield obliged to borrow money and to remark, "All the money lenders were ecclesiastics. The Jews had disappeared some years before and the greater part of the treasure of the country was now stored away in the chests of some wealthy clerk or in the coffers of the monastery." He was forced to raise money to pay his debts from the company of the Bellardi of Lucca. In an attempt to free himself from the Italian money lenders he exacted aids from the clergy, and borrowed from many church dignitaries in the north of England.

As a result of the ongoing war with Scotland York became almost the de facto capital of England, with Parliament being held there in 1298,9 and 1300. The Courts of Justice were also moved to York and did not return to London for seven years.

When the attack on the Templars in England began in 1308 Greenfield was favourable to them and so refused to take any part in actions against them within the province of Canterbury; he was however present at the Great Council of Vienne in 1312, when Pope Clement V issued an edict dissolving the Order of the Templars.

Greenfield died at his palace of Cawood, on the 6th December 1315,[2] and was buried in the eastern part of the north transept of York Minster, where his monument still remains. A gold ring with a ruby was taken from his finger when in 1735 his tomb was opened; these mementoes have been preserved by the Cathedral authorities.

See also

Notes

1. ^ Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 83
2. ^ Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 264

References

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
John Langton
Lord Chancellor
13021305
Succeeded by
William Hamilton
Religious titles
Preceded by
Thomas of Corbridge
Archbishop of York
13061315
Succeeded by
See vacant for two years, then
William Melton


Wilfrid II1 Egbert2 Ethelbert Eanbald I Eanbald II Wulfsige Wigmund Wulfhere thelbald Hrotheweard Wulfstan Oskytel Edwald Oswald Ealdwulf Wulfstan II Aelfric Puttoc Cynesige Aldred Thomas of Bayeux Gerard Thomas of York Thurstan William FitzHerbert Henry Murdac William FitzHerbert Roger de Pont L'Evque Geoffrey Plantagenet Simon Langton Walter de Gray Sewal de Bovil Godfrey Ludham William Langton Bonaventure Walter Giffard William de Wickwane John le Romeyn Henry of Newark Thomas of Corbridge William Greenfield William Melton William Zouche John of Thoresby Alexander Neville Thomas Arundel Robert Waldby Richard le Scrope Thomas Langley Robert Hallam Henry Bowet Philip Morgan Richard Fleming John Kempe William Booth George Neville Lawrence Booth Thomas Rotherham Thomas Savage Christopher Bainbridge Thomas Wolsey Post-Reformation
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Persondata
NAMEGreenfield, William
ALTERNATIVE NAMESWilliam of Greenfield
SHORT DESCRIPTIONArchbishop of York, Lord Chancellor
DATE OF BIRTH
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATHDecember 6, 1315
PLACE OF DEATHCawood
Thomas of Corbridge was Archbishop of York between 1300 and 1304.

Life

He was a canon of York before September 11 1277 and held the prebend of Osbaldwick.[1] He was a Doctor of Theology, probably from Oxford University.
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William Melton (died April 5, 1340) was the 43rd Archbishop of York (1317–1340).

Life

He was the son of Nicholaas of Melton, and the brother of John de Melton. He was born in Melton in the parish of Welton, about nine miles from Kingston upon Hull.
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December 6 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events


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1315 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1315
MCCCXV
Ab urbe condita 2068
Armenian calendar 764
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Bah' calendar -529 – -528
Buddhist calendar 1859
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The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom. He is the second highest ranking of the Great Officers of State and is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister.
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See also:
The Archbishop of York is a high-ranking cleric in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury.
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Walter Giffard (died April 1279) was Chancellor of England and Archbishop of York.

Family

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University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. for post-nominals, from "Oxoniensis"), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world.
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Churchdown

Churchdown, Gloucestershire ()
|240px|Churchdown, Gloucestershire (

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Godfrey Giffard, (c. 1235 – 1302) was Chancellor of the Exchequer of England, Lord Chancellor of England and Bishop of Worcester.

Family

Giffard was the son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton in Wiltshire, a royal justice, and of his wife Sibyl, daughter and
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The Bishop of Worcester is the ordinary in the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. The diocese covers the county of Worcestershire, the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, and parts of the City of Wolverhampton.
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A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. It is used mainly in the Anglican Communion and the Catholic Church.
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Chichester

Chichester (United Kingdom)

Chichester shown within the United Kingdom
Population 23,731
OS grid reference SU865045
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The word rector ("ruler," from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something.

The word "rector" also appears in many modern languages, such as Dutch and Spanish.
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Stratford-upon-Avon

Stratford-upon-Avon ()
|240px|Stratford-upon-Avon (

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A prebendary is a post connected to an Anglican or Catholic cathedral or collegiate church and is a type of canon. Prebendaries have a role in the administration of the cathedral.
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Ripon

Ripon ()
|240px|Ripon (

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The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom. He is the second highest ranking of the Great Officers of State and is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister.
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The Keeper or Master of the Rolls and Records of the Chancery of England, known as the Master of the Rolls, is the third most senior judge of England and Wales, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain traditionally being first and the Lord Chief Justice second.
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Templar may refer to:
  • Knights Templar, a medieval Christian military order that was very prominent in the Crusades, from the early 1100s until the early 1300s

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Canterbury

The city lies on the Great Stour River
Canterbury ()
|240px|Canterbury (

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Vienne

Coat of arms of the Vienne department
Location

Administration
Department number: 86
Region: Poitou-Charentes
Prefecture: Poitiers
Subprefectures: Châtellerault
Montmorillon
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The Priory (or rather Nunnery) of Arthington, in the Yorkshire village of Arthington was established by Peter de Arthington - nothing remains of the Priory today.

Foundation of the Priory

Arthington gave the nuns
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The following is a list of Lord Chancellors and Lord Keepers of the Great Seal of England and Great Britain.

Early Chancellors of England

  • Angmendus (605)
  • Cenmora (?)
  • Bosa (?)
  • Swithulplus (?)
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Pre-Reformation
Paulinus 1 Chad 1 Wilfrid 1 Bosa 1 John of Beverley 1 Wilfrid II 1 Egbert 2 Ethelbert Eanbald I
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The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB
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Sir (Frederick) Maurice Powicke (1879-1963) was an English medieval historian. He was a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford, delivered the Ford Lectures in 1927, and from 1929 was Regius Professor of History at Oxford.
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