Zappeion

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The Zappeion. Lycabettus Hill can de seen behind.
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The Zappeion


The Zappeion is a building in the National Gardens of Athens in the heart of Athens, Greece. It is generally used for meetings and ceremonies, both official and private.

Constructing the Zappeion

In 1869, the Greek Parliament allocated 80,000 m² of public land between the Palace Gardens and the ancient Temple of Olympian Zeus, and also passed a law on November 30, 1869, "for the building works of the Olympic Games" , as the Zappeion was the first building to be erected specifically for the revival of the Olympic Games in the modern world. [1][2] The ancient Panathenian stadium was also refurbished as part of the works for the Olympic Games. Following some delay, on January 20 1874 the cornerstone of the building was laid; [3] this new building would be designed by Danish architect Theophil Hansen. [4] Finally, on October 20 1888, the Zappeion opened.[5] Unfortunately for its benefactor, Evangelos Zappas, he did not live long enough to see the Zappeion built, and his cousin Konstantinos Zappas was nominated by Evangelos Zappas to complete the building.[6]

History

The Zappeion was used during the 1896 Summer Olympics as the main Fencing Hall. A decade later, at the 1906 Summer Olympics, it was used as the Olympic Village.[7]

A number of historical events have taken place at the Zappeion, including the signing of the documents formalizing Greece's accession to the European Union on January 1, 1981, which took place in the building's marble-clad, peristyle main atrium.

Current Building Uses

The Zappeion is currently being used as a Conference and Exhibition Center for both public and private purposes.

Halls and Floor Plans

The building contains about 25 distinct rooms that range in size from 97 m² to 984 m².

References

1. ^ Dimitri Iatridi, Grigori Ksirogianni, Georgio Andreaki, Konstantino Zappa, Iaonni Joachimidi, Panagioti Samartzi, Georgio Tsiami (1988). Επιτροπή Ολυμπίων και Κληροδοτημάτων, Ζάππειο 1888-1988 (in Greek). Economic Ministry of the Olympic Committee and Legacy at the Zappeion Megaro. 
2. ^ David C. Young (1996). The Modern Olympics - A Struggle for Revival. The Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-5374-5. 
3. ^ [1]
4. ^ [2]
5. ^ [3]
6. ^ [4]
7. ^ [5]

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National Garden (formerly the Royal Garden) (Greek: Εθνικός Κήπος) is a peaceful, green refuge of 15.5 hectares in the center of the Greek capital.
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Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 70 - 338 m (0 - 0 ft)
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The name Temple of Olympian Zeus can refer to the following ancient Greek temples:
  • Temple of Olympian Zeus (Agrigento)
  • Temple of Olympian Zeus (Athens)
There was also a Temple of Zeus at Olympia. It is southeast from the Acropolis. It was built in the Fifth Century BCE.
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November 30 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events


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18th century - 19th century - 20th century
1830s  1840s  1850s  - 1860s -  1870s  1880s  1890s
1866 1867 1868 - 1869 - 1870 1871 1872

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Olympic Games (often referred to simply as The Olympics or The Games[1]) is an international multi-sport event subdivided into summer and winter sporting events. The summer and winter games are each held every four years (an Olympiad[2]).
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The Panathinaiko (Panathenaic) Stadium (also known as the Kallimarmaron, i.e. the "beautifully marbled") in Athens is the only major stadium in the world built fully of white marble (from Mount Penteli).
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Olympic Games (often referred to simply as The Olympics or The Games[1]) is an international multi-sport event subdivided into summer and winter sporting events. The summer and winter games are each held every four years (an Olympiad[2]).
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January 20 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

In astrology, it is the cusp day between Capricorn and Aquarius.
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18th century - 19th century - 20th century
1840s  1850s  1860s  - 1870s -  1880s  1890s  1900s
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Theophil Edvard Freiherr von Hansen (original Danish name: Theophilus Hansen) (July 13, 1813 in Copenhagen - February 17, 1891 in Vienna) was a Danish architect.
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October 20 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

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Evangelis Zappas aka Evangelos Zappas (1800–1865) was a Greek businessman, philanthropist, and founder of the modern international Olympic Games.

He was born in northern Epirus (today part of Albania) in 1800 and moved to Bucharest in 1831.
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The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were held in 1896 in Athens, Greece. These games were the first modern international Olympic Games to be organised by the International Olympic Committee.
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The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. These games are not awarded the title of Olympiad because they were held between the III and IV Olympiads.
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Frequently, an Olympic Village is built within an Olympic Park or elsewhere in a host city. Olympic Villages are built to house all participating athletes, as well as officials, trainers, etc. The idea of the Olympic Village comes from Pierre de Coubertin.
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Marble is a nonfoliated metamorphic rock resulting from the metamorphism of limestone, composed mostly of calcite (a crystalline form of calcium carbonate, CaCO3). It is extensively used for sculpture, as a building material, and in many other applications.
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peristyle is a columned porch or open colonnade in a building that surrounds a court that may contain an internal garden. "Tetrastoon" (Greek: "four arcades") is another name for this feature.
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Atrium may refer to:
  • Atrium (heart), an anatomical structure of the heart
  • Atrium (architecture), a large open space within a building

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Greek}}} 
Writing system: Greek alphabet 
Official status
Official language of:  Greece
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recognised as minority language in parts of:
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landmark literally meant a geographic feature used by explorers and others to find their way back or through an area.

In modern usage, it includes anything that is easily recognizable, such as a monument, building, or other structure.
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Location

Coordinates Coordinates:
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 70 - 338 m (0 - 0 ft)
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State Party  Greece
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv, vi
Reference 404
Region Europe and North America

Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
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Ancient Agora of Athens is the most well-known agora, located in Athens, Greece.

The agora in Athens had private housing, until it was reorganized by Peisistratus in the 6th century BC.
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Arch of Hadrian is a monumental gateway resembling – in some respects - a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus.
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Choragic Monument of Lysicrates near the Acropolis of Athens was erected by the choregos Lysicrates, a patron of many theatrical performances in the Theater of Dionysus, to commemorate the award of first prize in 335 BC or 334 BC, to one of the performances he had
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Hellenic Parliament
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Speaker Dimitris Sioufas, New Democracy
since September 27 2007
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Members 300
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Kerameikos is the name of the deme or part of Athens to the northwest of the Acropolis and includes an extensive area both within and outside the city walls, on both sides of the Dipylon Gate and by the banks of the Eridanos River.
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