Curia Regis

Curia Regis is a Latin term meaning "Royal Council" or "King's court".

The Curia Regis in the Kingdom of England was a council of tenants-in-chief and ecclesiastics that advised the king of England on legislative matters. It replaced its Anglo-Saxon predecessor, the Witenagemot, after the Norman invasion of 1066.

William the Conqueror brought to England the feudal system of his native Normandy. Thus, he granted land to his most important military supporters, who in turn granted land to their supporters, thus creating a feudal hierarchy. Those who held lands directly from the King were known as tenants-in-chief, and the territories they held were called manors. William I was an absolute ruler, but, as a matter of course, he sought the advice of the curia regis, before making laws.

The tenants-in-chief often struggled with their spiritual counterparts and with the King for power. In 1215, they secured from John the Magna Carta, which established that the King may not levy or collect any taxes (except the feudal taxes to which they were hitherto accustomed), save with the consent of this council. It was also established that the most important tenants-in-chief (the earls and the barons), as well as the ecclesiastics (archbishops, bishops and abbots) be summoned to the council by personal writs from the Sovereign, and that all others be summoned to the council by general writs from the sheriffs of their counties. John later repealed the Magna Carta, but Henry III reinstated it.

The royal council slowly developed into a Parliament. In 1265, Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, who was in rebellion against Henry III, summoned a parliament of his supporters without any royal authorisation. The archbishops, bishops, abbots, earls and barons were summoned, as were two knights from each shire and two burgesses from each borough. Knights had been summoned to previous councils, but the representation of the boroughs was unprecedented. De Montfort's scheme was formally adopted by Edward I in the so-called "Model Parliament" of 1295. At first, each estate debated independently; by the reign of Edward III, however, Parliament had been separated into two Houses and was assuming recognisably its modern form.

See also

Latin}}} 
Official status
Official language of: Vatican City
Used for official purposes, but not spoken in everyday speech
Regulated by: Opus Fundatum Latinitas
Roman Catholic Church
Language codes
ISO 639-1: la
ISO 639-2: lat
..... Click the link for more information.
Kingdom of England was a state located in western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain, consisting of the modern day constituent countries of England and Wales and the modern legal entity of England and Wales.
..... Click the link for more information.
Christianity

Foundations
Jesus Christ
Church Theology
New Covenant Supersessionism
Dispensationalism
Apostles Kingdom Gospel
History of Christianity Timeline
Bible
Old Testament New Testament
Books Canon Apocrypha
..... Click the link for more information.
The Witenagemot (also called the Witan, more properly the title of its members) was a political institution in Anglo-Saxon England which operated between approximately the 7th century and 11th century.
..... Click the link for more information.
11st century - 12nd century
1030s  1040s  1050s  - 1060s -  1070s  1080s  1090s
1063 1064 1065 - 1066 - 1067 1068 1069

Lists of leaders
State leaders - Sovereign states
Birth and death categories
-

..... Click the link for more information.
William I of England (William the Conqueror; c. 1028 – 9 September 1087) was a medieval monarch. He ruled as the Duke of Normandy from 1035 to 1087 and as King of England from 1066 to 1087.
..... Click the link for more information.
Motto
Dieu et mon droit   (French)
"God and my right"
Anthem
No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is "God Save the Queen".
..... Click the link for more information.
Feudalism refers to a general set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the warrior nobility of Europe during the Middle Ages, revolving around the three key concepts of lords, vassals, and fiefs.
..... Click the link for more information.
Normandy (in French: Normandie, and in Norman: Normaundie) is a geographical region corresponding to the former Duchy of Normandy. It is situated along the coasts of the south of the English Channel between Brittany (to the west) and Picardy (to the east) and
..... Click the link for more information.
Manorialism or Seigneurialism is the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic power in a lord supported economically from his own direct landholding and from the obligatory
..... Click the link for more information.
1215 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1215
MCCXV
Ab urbe condita 1968
Armenian calendar 664
ԹՎ ՈԿԴ
Bah' calendar -629 – -628
Buddhist calendar 1759
..... Click the link for more information.
John (24 December 1166 – 18/19 October 1216) reigned as King of England from 6 April, 1199, until his death. He succeeded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I (known in later times as "Richard the Lionheart").
..... Click the link for more information.
Magna Carta (Latin for "Great Charter", literally "Great Paper"), also called Magna Carta Libertatum ("Great Charter of Freedoms"), is an English charter originally issued in 1215.
..... Click the link for more information.
Earl or Jarl was an Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian title meaning "chieftain" and referring especially to chieftains set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced with duke (hertig/hertug
..... Click the link for more information.
Baron is a specific title of nobility. The word baron comes from Spanish barón, itself from Frankish baro meaning "freeman, warrior"; it merged with cognate Old English beorn meaning "nobleman.
..... Click the link for more information.
Christianity

Foundations
Jesus Christ
Church Theology
New Covenant Supersessionism
Dispensationalism
Apostles Kingdom Gospel
History of Christianity Timeline
Bible
Old Testament New Testament
Books Canon Apocrypha
..... Click the link for more information.
Christianity

Foundations
Jesus Christ
Church Theology
New Covenant Supersessionism
Dispensationalism
Apostles Kingdom Gospel
History of Christianity Timeline
Bible
Old Testament New Testament
Books Canon Apocrypha
..... Click the link for more information.
worldwide view of the subject.
Please [ improve this article] or discuss the issue on the talk page.


The word abbot, meaning father, is a title given to the head of a monastery in various traditions, including Christianity and Buddhism.
..... Click the link for more information.
SHERIFF is a telecom fraud detection and management system, originally developed by BT and MCI. SHERIFF is an acronym for Statistical Heuristic Engine to Reliably and Intelligently Fight Fraud.
..... Click the link for more information.
Henry III
By the Grace of God, King of England,
Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine


Reign 18-19 October 1216 - 16 November 1272
Coronation 28 October 1216, Gloucester
Born 1 September 1207
..... Click the link for more information.
Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England. Its roots can be traced back to the early medieval period. In a series of developments, it came increasingly to constrain the power of the monarch, and went on after the Act of Union 1707 to form the main basis of
..... Click the link for more information.
1265 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1265
MCCLXV
Ab urbe condita 2018
Armenian calendar 714
ԹՎ ՉԺԴ
Bah' calendar -579 – -578
Buddhist calendar 1809
..... Click the link for more information.
Simon V de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III of England. After the rebellion of 1263-1264, de Montfort became de facto
..... Click the link for more information.
Henry III
By the Grace of God, King of England,
Lord of Ireland and Duke of Aquitaine


Reign 18-19 October 1216 - 16 November 1272
Coronation 28 October 1216, Gloucester
Born 1 September 1207
..... Click the link for more information.
Knight is the English term for a social position originating in the Middle Ages. In the Commonwealth of Nations, knighthood is a non-heritable form of gentility, but is not nobility.
..... Click the link for more information.
A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. In principle, the term borough designates a self-governing township although, in practice, official use of the term varies widely.
..... Click the link for more information.
Edward I
By the Grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward I depicted in Cassell's History of England (1902)
Reign 20 November 1272 – 7 July 1307
Coronation 19 August 1274
Born
..... Click the link for more information.
Model Parliament (also referred to as a Mock Parliament) is a simulation of a the parliamentary proceedings of a legislature or other deliberative assembly, often based upon the Westminster Parliamentary system.
..... Click the link for more information.
1295 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1295
MCCXCV
Ab urbe condita 2048
Armenian calendar 744
ԹՎ ՉԽԴ
Bah' calendar -549 – -548
Buddhist calendar 1839
..... Click the link for more information.
estates of the realm were the broad divisions of society, usually distinguishing nobility, clergy, and commoners recognised in the Middle Ages, and also later, in Europe. While various realms inverted the order of the first two, commoners were universally tertiary, and often
..... Click the link for more information.


This article is copied from an article on Wikipedia.org - the free encyclopedia created and edited by online user community. The text was not checked or edited by anyone on our staff. Although the vast majority of the wikipedia encyclopedia articles provide accurate and timely information please do not assume the accuracy of any particular article. This article is distributed under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.