green, leafy vegetables

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Creamed spinach
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Steamed kale


Leaf vegetables, also called potherbs, greens, or leafy greens, are plant leaves eaten as a vegetable, sometimes accompanied by tender petioles and shoots. Although they come from a very wide variety of plants, most share a great deal with other leaf vegetables in nutrition and cooking methods.

Nearly one thousand species of plants with edible leaves are known. Leaf vegetables most often come from short-lived herbaceous plants such as lettuce and spinach. Woody plants whose leaves can be eaten as leaf vegetables include Adansonia, Aralia, Moringa, Morus, and Toona species.

The leaves of many fodder crops are also edible by humans, but usually only eaten under famine conditions. Examples include alfalfa, clover, and most grasses, including wheat and barley. These plants are often much more prolific than more traditional leaf vegetables, but exploitation of their rich nutrition is difficult, primarily because of their high fiber content. This obstacle can be overcome by further processing such as drying and grinding into powder or pulping and pressing for juice.

During the first half of the 20th century many grocery stores with vegetable sections sold small bunches of herbs tied with a string to small green and red peppers known as "potherbs."

Nutrition

Leaf vegetables are typically low in calories, low in fat, high in protein per calorie, high in dietary fiber, high in iron and calcium, and very high in phytochemicals such as vitamin C, vitamin A, lutein and folic acid.

Preparation

Most leaf vegetables can be eaten raw, for example in salads. Leafy greens can be used to wrap other ingredients like a tortilla. They may also be stir-fried, stewed or steamed. Leaf vegetables stewed with pork are a traditional dish in soul food, and southern U.S. cuisine. They are also commonly eaten in a variety of South Asian dishes such as Saag.

See also

External links

leaf is an above-ground plant organ specialized for photosynthesis. For this purpose, a leaf is typically flat (laminar) and thin, to expose the cells containing chloroplast (chlorenchyma tissue, a type of parenchyma) to light over a broad area, and to allow light to penetrate
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Vegetable is a term which generally refers to an edible part of a plant. The definition is traditional rather than scientific and is somewhat arbitrary and subjective. All parts of herbaceous plants eaten as food by humans, whole or in part, are normally considered vegetables.
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petiole ('pet-ee-ohl'; from Latin peciolus "little foot," diminutive of pediculus "foot stalk," itself a diminutive of pes "foot") is the small stalk attaching the leaf blade to the stem. The petiole usually has the same internal structure as the stem.
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Shoots are fresh new plant growth, they can include stems, flowering stems with flower buds, leaves. The new growth from seed germination that grows upward is a shoot where leaves will develop.
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Nutrition is a science that examines the relationship between diet and health. Dietitians are health professionals who specialize in this area of study, and are trained to provide safe, evidence-based dietary advice and interventions.
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Cooking is the act of preparing food for eating by the application of heat. It encompasses a vast range of methods, tools and combinations of ingredients to alter the flavor or digestibility of food.
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Ecoport are from the Ecoport Web site, an ecology portal developed in collaboration with the FAO.[3].
  • Those marked with GRIN are from the GRIN Taxonomy of Food Plants.
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  • Herbs (IPA: hə(ɹ)b, or əɹb; see pronunciation differences) are seed-bearing plants without woody stems, which die down to the ground after flowering.
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    L. sativa

    Binomial name
    Lactuca sativa
    L.

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    S. oleracea

    Binomial name
    Spinacia oleracea
    L.

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a flowering plant in the family of Amaranthaceae, native to central and southwestern Asia.
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    Baobab is the common name of a genus (Adansonia) containing eight species of trees, native to Madagascar (the centre of diversity, with six species), mainland Africa and Australia (one species in each).
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    Aralia
    L.

    Species
    • Aralia apioides
    • Aralia armata
    • Aralia atropurpurea
    • Aralia bicrenata
    • Aralia bipinnata
    • Aralia cachemirica
    • Aralia caesia

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    Moringaceae

    Genus: Moringa

    Species

    Moringa arborea
    Moringa borziana
    Moringa concanensis
    Moringa drouhardii
    Moringa hildebrandtii

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    Morus
    L.

    Species
    See text.

    Mulberry (Morus) is a genus of 10–16 species of deciduous trees native to warm temperate and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa and North America, with the majority of the species native to
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    Toona

    species

    See text.

    Toona is a genus of five or six species of trees in the mahogany family Meliaceae, native from eastern China south to India, southeast Asia and northern Australia.
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    fodder or animal feed is any foodstuff that is used specifically to feed domesticated livestock, including cattle, goats, sheep, horses, chickens and pigs. Most animal feed is from plants but some fodder is of animal origin.
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    A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic, and increased mortality.

    Although many famines coincide with national or regional shortages of food, famine has also occurred amid plenty or on account of
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    M. sativa

    Binomial name
    Medicago sativa
    L.

    Subspecies

    Medicago sativa subsp. ambigua (Trautv.) Tutin
    Medicago sativa subsp.
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    Trifolium
    L.

    Species
    See text

    Clover (Trifolium) is a genus of about 300 species of plants in the pea family Fabaceae.
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    Poaceae
    (R.Br.) Barnhart

    Subfamilies

    There are 7 subfamilies:
    Subfamily Arundinoideae
    Subfamily Bambusoideae
    Subfamily Centothecoideae
    Subfamily Chloridoideae
    Subfamily Panicoideae
    Subfamily Pooideae
    Subfamily Stipoideae


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    H. vulgare

    Binomial name
    Hordeum vulgare
    L.

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is an annual cereal grain, which serves as a major animal feed crop, with smaller amounts used for malting and in
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    Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. Dietary fiber consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as cellulose and many other plant components such as dextrins, inulin,
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    Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. The food processing industry utilises these processes.
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    Fat

    Fat may refer to:
    • Fat, a group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water
    • Adipose tissue, an anatomical term for loose connective tissue composed of adipocytes

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    Proteins are large organic compounds made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain and joined together by peptide bonds between the carboxyl and amino groups of adjacent amino acid residues.
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    Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. Dietary fiber consists of non-starch polysaccharides such as cellulose and many other plant components such as dextrins, inulin,
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    3, 4, 6
    (amphoteric oxide)
    Electronegativity 1.83 (Pauling scale)
    Ionization energies
    (more) 1st: 762.5 kJmol−1
    2nd: 1561.9 kJmol−1
    3rd: 2957 kJmol−1

    Atomic radius 140 pm
    Atomic radius (calc.
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    Calcium (IPA: /ˈkalsiəm/) is the chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Ca and atomic number 20. It has an atomic mass of 40.078.
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    The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed.
    Please see the relevant discussion on the .
    Phytochemicals are plant or fruit derived chemical compounds. "Phytonutrients" refer to phytochemicals or compounds that come from edible plants.
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