Joe Lieberman

Joe Lieberman
Enlarge picture
Joe Lieberman


Preceded by
Succeeded by

BornJanuary 24 1942 (1942--) (age 65)
Stamford, Connecticut
Political partyLabour Party
Spouse1) Elizabeth Haas (div.)
2) Hadassah Lieberman
Alma materYale University
ProfessionPolitician, Lawyer
ReligionJewish

Joseph Isadore "Joe" Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. Lieberman was first elected to the United States Senate in 1988, and was elected to his fourth term on November 7, 2006. In the 2000 U.S. presidential election, Lieberman was the Democratic candidate for Vice President, running alongside presidential nominee Al Gore, becoming the first Jewish candidate on a major American political party presidential ticket. Gore and Lieberman won the popular vote, but failed to gain the electoral votes needed to win the election. However, Lieberman ran for re-election to the U.S. Senate while he was also Gore's running-mate, and he was re-elected by the voters of Connecticut. [1] He attempted a run for the Democratic nominee in the 2004 Presidential election, but was unsuccessful.

During his reelection bid in 2006, he lost the Democratic Party primary election, but won reelection in the general election as an independent candidate under the party label "Connecticut for Lieberman." Lieberman is now officially listed in Senate records for the 110th Congress as an "Independent Democrat",[2] and sits as part of the Democratic Senate caucus in the 110th Congress.

Lieberman has been one of the Senate's strongest advocates for continued prosecution of the Iraq War. He is also a consistent supporter of Israel. On domestic issues, he holds liberal views on some economic issues, though he is a supporter of free trade. Along with Lynne Cheney and others, Lieberman co-founded American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA), an educational association with ties to Campus Watch. Lieberman has also voted with Republicans on some ethical issues, and is one of the Senate's leading opponents of violence in video games and on television. Lieberman describes himself as being "genuinely an Independent," saying "I agree more often than not with Democrats on domestic policy. I agree more often than not with Republicans on foreign and defense policy."[3]

Early life

Lieberman was born in Stamford, Connecticut, to Henry Lieberman (April 3, 1915January 3, 1986), the son of Jewish immigrants from Poland, and Marcia Manger (November 1, 1914June 25, 2005), of Austrian Jewish background. The Liebermans owned the Hamilton Liquor Store, which the couple operated until Henry Lieberman's retirement in 1977.[4] The couple also had two daughters, Rietta Miller and Ellen Lieberman. Joe Lieberman attended Stamford High School and was elected president of his senior class in 1960.[5] In the fall of 1963, Lieberman traveled to Mississippi for several weeks, helping African-Americans register to vote.[6]

He received his BA in Politics and Economics from Yale University in 1964; he was the first member of his family to graduate from college. He then attended Yale Law School, receiving his LLB law degree in 1967. After graduation from law school, Lieberman worked for a New Haven-based law firm, Wiggin & Dana LLP.

Career

Lieberman was elected as a "reform Democrat" to the Connecticut Senate in 1970, campaigning on an anti-Vietnam War platform. Lieberman served for 10 years, including the last six as Majority Leader. He suffered his first defeat in Connecticut elections in the Reagan landslide year of 1980, losing the race for the Third District Congressional seat to Republican Lawrence Joseph DeNardis, a state senator from suburban Hamden with whom he had worked closely on bipartisan legislative efforts. From 1982 to 1988, he served as Connecticut's 21st Attorney General and emphasized consumer protection and environmental enforcement.

Personal life

Lieberman met his first wife, Betty Haas, at the congressional office of Senator Abraham Ribicoff (D-CT), where they worked as summer student interns. They married in 1965 while he was in law school. They had two children — Matt and Rebecca. Betty later worked as a psychiatric social worker. In 1981, the couple divorced. When asked about the divorce in an interview with New York Magazine, Lieberman said that his time intensive public life and differences on religious observance (Betty was a Reform Jew) strained the marriage. [7]

In 1982, he met his second wife, Hadassah Freilich Tucker while he was running for attorney general of Connecticut. Hadassah Lieberman is the child of a Holocaust survivor. According to Washington Jewish Week, Lieberman called her for a date because he thought it would be interesting to go out with someone named Hadassah. (Hadassah is also the name of a prominent Jewish social organization).[8] Hadassah Lieberman has held senior positions at the Hospital of Saint Raphael in New Haven, the American Committee for Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO), Pfizer, National Research Council, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Lehman Brothers. Since March 2005, she has worked for Hill & Knowlton, a lobbying firm based in New York City, as a senior counselor in its health and pharmaceuticals practice.

Joe and Hadassah Lieberman have a daughter, Hana. Lieberman also has a stepson from Hadassah's previous marriage, Ethan Tucker. Matt Lieberman graduated from Yale University in 1989, and from Yale Law School in 1994. He is the Head of School of Greenfield Hebrew Academy in Atlanta, GA. Rebecca Lieberman graduated from Barnard College in 1991, and from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1997. She is married to Jacob Wisse. Ethan Tucker graduated from Harvard College in 1997 and subsequently studied for rabbinic ordination at Yeshivat Ma'ale Gilboa in Israel and received his Ph.D. in Talmud from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Lieberman never served in the military. A spokesperson told the Hartford Courant in 1994 that Lieberman received an educational deferment from the Vietnam War draft when he was an undergraduate and law student from 1960 to 1967. Upon graduating from law school at 25, Lieberman qualified for a family deferment as he was already married and had one child.[9]

Between 2000 and 2004, the Liebermans' income ranged from $266,600 to $499,735. On their joint 2005 federal tax return, the couple's total income in 2004 was $366,084, which includes $146,608 from Joe Lieberman's job in the Senate and $76,950 from Hadassah Lieberman's job with Hill & Knowlton. The couple reported another $91,446 in income from speaking and consulting fees — largely earned by Hadassah — and $27,000 in capital gains earnings. They paid more than $60,000 in taxes. They made $13,127 in charitable contributions and received a $5,241 tax refund. Lieberman underpaid his federal taxes in 2002, resulting in a $739 penalty.

Religion

Lieberman is an Orthodox Jew, though he was less observant in 1965 when he married his first wife who was a Reform Jew. Since the death in 1967 of Lieberman's grandmother, a deeply religious immigrant, he found renewed interest in religious observance. His second wife, Hadassah, is also an observant Orthodox Jew. "Hadassah calls herself my right wing," says Lieberman.[7] In Lieberman's 1988 upset of GOP incumbent Senator Lowell Weicker, his religious observance was mostly viewed in terms of inability to campaign on Shabbat. This changed when Gore chose Lieberman as his running mate; a Lieberman press officer who spoke on condition of anonymity said:
Insert the text of the quote here, without quotation marks.
The Liebermans keep a kosher home. Nonetheless, some Orthodox Jews have voiced concerns about the Liebermans' omissions, such as Mr. Lieberman's conduct of business matters on the Sabbath[10] , and Hadassah's infrequent covering of her head.[11]

Lieberman has said that there is currently "a constitutional place for faith in our public life."[12] He attends Kesher Israel Congregation in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. and Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol - B'nai Israel, The Westville Synagogue, New Haven, Connecticut. He also attends Congregation Agudath Sholom in Stamford, CT.

Political positions

:


Lieberman has taken positions on the following issues over the years:

Domestic policy

  • Affirmative action: In 1995, he stated that he is "against group preferences," but in 2000 he recanted and said he supports affirmative action. In 2004 he supported federal funding for women and minority contractors on highway projects.
  • Consumer Protection: Lieberman has voted to limit damage awards in product liability cases.
  • Education: He has supported experimental school voucher programs, and accused President George W. Bush of failing to fund the "No Child Left Behind" program.
  • Entertainment industry and video games: Lieberman cosponsored an act to restrict the sale of violent video games to minors.
  • Environment: He cosponsored the 1990 Clean Air Act, and says the US must accept responsibility for global warming.
  • Judicial filibusters: Lieberman was one of the bipartisan "Gang of 14" that offered a compromise on using filibusters for Bush's Supreme Court nominees.
  • Gay rights: Lieberman voted against a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, but opposes legalizing it.
  • Gun control: Lieberman has supported gun control measures and has received an "F" rating from the National Rifle Association.
  • Health care: He has criticized Bush's Medicare plan for insufficient funding. He supports embryonic stem cell research.
  • Abortion Lieberman is generally considered pro-choice, even though he supported the appointment of pro-life Supreme Court justices John Roberts and Samuel Alito. He opposed the Child Custody Protection Act of 2006 that made it a crime to transport a minor across state lines for the purpose of an abortion. Lieberman has also supported the right of Catholic hospitals to refuse to provide contraceptives to rape victims, asserting that, "In Connecticut, it shouldn’t take more than a short ride to get to another hospital." [13].
  • Social Security: In 2005, Lieberman urged Congress to reject the Social Security Commission's report that recommended private accounts for social security.
  • Tax, labor, and business: In 1994, Lieberman voted to maintain a tax loophole that allowed companies to avoid recording stock options as an expense. He has opposed much of the Bush tax plan.
  • Flag burning: Lieberman voted against amending the Constitution to criminalize flag burning.

Foreign policy

Senate tenure

Enlarge picture
An earlier Senate portrait


Like Bill Clinton and Dick Gephardt, Lieberman has served as chair of the Democratic Leadership Council.

In 1998, Lieberman was the first prominent Democrat to publicly challenge Clinton for the judgment exercised in his affair with Monica Lewinsky.[14] However, he voted against removing Clinton from office.

When control of the Senate switched from Republicans to Democrats in June 2001, Lieberman became Chairman of the Governmental Affairs Committee, with oversight responsibilities for a broad range of government activities. When Republicans gained control of the Senate in January 2003, Lieberman resumed his role as ranking minority member of the committees he had once chaired.[15]

As Senator, Lieberman is Chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, which is responsible for assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of the federal government. In addition, he is a member of the Environment and Public Works Committee and chair of its Subcommittee on Clean Air, Wetlands and Private Property; the Senate Armed Services Committee, where he is Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Air Land Forces and sits on the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities; and the Small Business Committee.

Lieberman served as co-chair of the Senate Centrist Coalition alongside Maine Republican Olympia Snowe, an organization he abandoned at the end of his third term in favor of establishing his own bipartisan organization.[16]

Lieberman has toyed with the idea of switching his affiliation to Republican,[17][18] but this would not cause the Republicans to become the majority party during the 110th session of Congress.[19] [20] [21]

Elections

In 1988, Lieberman defeated moderate Republican Lowell Weicker to win election to the Senate. He was re-elected in 1994, 2000, and 2006.

Senate election, 1988

Lieberman was first elected to the Senate as a Democrat in 1988, by a margin of 10,000 votes. He scored the nation's biggest political upset that year, unseating three-term Republican incumbent Lowell Weicker. In Lieberman's 2003 memoir about the 2000 campaign, he credits Massachusetts Senator John Kerry with convincing him to run. Kerry was the 1988 election cycle chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

Aiding Lieberman's victory was the fact that Weicker was abandoned by conservative Republicans such as William F. Buckley, Jr. Consequently, Lieberman ran especially well in conservative areas of the 5th District, where Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis received fewer votes than George H.W. Bush.

During the campaign, Lieberman received support from Connecticut's Cuban-American community, which was unhappy with Weicker, who was known as a supporter of Fidel Castro. Lieberman has since remained loyal to the anti-Castro cause.[22]

1994 and 2000 campaigns

In 1994, Lieberman made history by winning by the largest landslide ever in a Connecticut Senate race, drawing 67 percent of the vote and beating Jerry Labriola, his Republican opponent, by more than 350,000 votes.

In 2000, Lieberman ran for reelection once again, and when Al Gore nominated him for Vice President Lieberman remained on the Senate ballot. This was not unprecedented; Democratic VP candidates Lyndon Johnson in 1960 and Lloyd Bentsen in 1988 both ran for Senate at the same time as running for Vice President, hoping to maintain that seat in the Senate if they lost the Vice Presidency. Unlike Johnson and Bentsen, however, Lieberman's decision would have affected control of the Senate whether he had become Vice President or Senator.

If Lieberman had won both races, he would have become Vice President, leaving his Senate seat open. The Republican Governor of Connecticut, John G. Rowland, would nominate somebody to take Lieberman's Senate seat, most likely a Republican, thus giving the Senate a Republican majority. What actually happened at the beginning of the 107th Senate was that each party had exactly 50 Senators, and the Vice President who got to break ties.

Nevertheless, Lieberman easily defeated his Republican opponent, Philip Giordano, 63 percent to 34 percent.

Vice-Presidential campaign, 2000

Enlarge picture
Gore/Lieberman 2000 campaign logo
In August 2000, Lieberman was selected as the nominee for Vice President of the United States by Al Gore, the Democratic Party nominee for President. Lieberman was the first Jewish candidate on a major political party presidential ticket. The announcement of Lieberman's selection may have resulted in an increase in support for Gore's campaign.[23] The Gore/Lieberman ticket won a plurality of the popular vote, with over half a million more votes than the Republican ticket of George W. Bush and Dick Cheney, but they were defeated in the Electoral College by a vote of 271 to 266. The Gore campaign lost Florida by only 269 votes after the U.S. Supreme Court prevented a select recount of the popular vote in four Florida counties (Broward, Miami Dade, Palm Beach, and Volusia).

Lieberman later criticized Gore for adopting a populist theme during their 2000 campaign, and stated he had objected to Gore's "people vs. the powerful" message.[24]

Presidential campaign, 2004

On January 13 2003, Lieberman announced his intention to seek the Democratic nomination as a candidate in the 2004 presidential election. Describing his Presidential hopes, Lieberman opined that his historically hawkish stance would appeal to voters. Prior to his defeat in New Hampshire, Lieberman famously declared his campaign was picking up "Joementum".[25] On February 3 2004, Lieberman withdrew his candidacy after failing to win any of the five primaries or two caucuses held that day. He acknowledged to the Hartford Courant that his support for the war in Iraq was a large part of his undoing with voters.[26]

Gore did not support Lieberman's Presidential run, and in December 2003 endorsed Howard Dean's candidacy, saying "This is about all of us and all of us need to get behind the strongest candidate."[27]

Senate election, 2006

Primary

Main article: Democratic Party primary, Connecticut United States Senate election, 2006
'''Democratic Primary Results
Candidate Votes[28] Percentage
Ned Lamont146,58752%
Joe Lieberman136,46848%
Lieberman sought the Democratic Party's renomination for U.S. Senate from Connecticut in 2006 but lost to Ned Lamont, a Greenwich businessman and Moveon.org sponsored candidate.

Lieberman was officially endorsed by the Connecticut Democratic Convention, which met in May. However, Lamont received 33 percent of the delegates' votes, forcing an August primary.

In July, Lieberman announced that he would file papers to appear on the November ballot should he lose the primary. He said, "I'm a loyal Democrat, but I have loyalties that are greater than those to my party, and that's my loyalty to my state and my country."[29] He stated that he would continue to sit as a Democrat in the Senate even if he was defeated in the primary and elected on an unaffiliated line, and expressed concern for a potentially low turnout.[30] On July 10, the Lieberman campaign officially filed paperwork allowing him to collect signatures for the newly formed Connecticut for Lieberman party ballot line.[31]

On August 8, 2006, Lieberman conceded the Democratic primary election to Ned Lamont, saying, "For the sake of our state, our country and my party, I cannot and will not let that result stand," and announced he would run (and eventually did win) in the 2006 November election as an independent candidate on the Connecticut for Lieberman ticket, against both Lamont and the Republican candidate, Alan Schlesinger.[32]

November election



On August 9, 2006, Lieberman announced his intention to run as an "independent Democrat" in the upcoming November election.[33] He petitioned to run on the ticket of Connecticut for Lieberman party, saying that this was a technicality and that he would continue to caucus in the Senate as a Democrat.[34]

Polls after the primary showed Lieberman ahead of Lamont by five points; later polls showed Lieberman leading by varying margins. Schlesinger barely registered support, and his campaign ran into problems based on his gambling debts.

On August 9, 2006, Hillary Clinton affirmed her pledge to support the primary winner, saying "voters of Connecticut have made their decision and I think that decision should be respected,"[35] and Howard Dean called for Lieberman to quit the race, saying he was being "disrespectful of Democrats and disrespectful of the Democratic Party."[36]

On August 10, in his first campaign appearance since losing the Democratic primary, referencing the 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot, Lieberman criticized Lamont, saying:[37]
If we just pick up like Ned Lamont wants us to do, get out [of Iraq] by a date certain, it will be taken as a tremendous victory by the same people who wanted to blow up these planes in this plot hatched in England. It will strengthen them and they will strike again.


Lamont augured that Lieberman was sounding like Bush, stating, “That comment sounds an awful lot like Vice President Cheney’s comment on Wednesday. Both of them believe our invasion of Iraq has a lot to do with 9/11. That’s a false premise.”[37] Lieberman's communications director replied that Lamont was politicizing national security by "portraying [Lieberman] as a soulmate of President Bush on Iraq."[37]

Lieberman was endorsed by a number of Republicans across the United States. On August 17, 2006, the National Republican Senatorial Committee stated that they would favor a Lieberman victory in the November election over Lamont. The NRSC did state, however, that they were not going so far as to actually support Lieberman.[38] He was also endorsed by numerous Republicans across the United States. They actively spoke out in favor of his candidacy. National conservative radio talk show hosts Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Glenn Beck were among those that endorsed Lieberman on their shows. Lieberman was also the focus of websites such as ConservativesforLieberman06.com.[39]

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani praised Lieberman at a South Carolina campaign stop on August 18, saying he was "a really exceptional senator."[40] Other Republican supporters of Lieberman included Mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg, Former Representative and Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Jack Kemp, Fmr. Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and Senator Susan Collins of Maine.

Five Democratic Senators maintained their support for Lieberman, and Lieberman also received the strong support of former Senator Bob Kerrey, who offered to stump for him.[41] Democratic minority leader Harry Reid, while endorsing the party nominee, Lamont, promised Lieberman that he would retain his committee positions and seniority if he prevailed in the general election.

On August 28, Lieberman campaigned at the same motorcycle rally as GOP Congressman Christopher Shays. Shays told a crowd of motorcycle enthusiasts, "We have a national treasure in Joe Lieberman."

Mel Sembler, a former Republican National Committee finance chairman, helped organize a reception that raised a "couple hundred thousand dollars" for Lieberman, who was personally in attendance. Sembler is a prominent Republican who chairs I. Lewis 'Scooter' Libby's legal defense fund.[42] New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) held a fundraiser for Lieberman at his home in November, co-hosted by former mayor Ed Koch (D) and former Senator Alfonse M. D'Amato (R).[43] Koch called Lieberman "one of the greatest Senators we've ever had in the Senate."[44]

On November 7, Lieberman won reelection as an independent candidate with 50 percent of the vote. Lamont garnered 40 percent of ballots cast and Schlesinger won 10 percent.[45] Lieberman received support from 33 percent of Democrats, 54 percent of Independents, and 70 percent of Republicans.

Following the election, Lieberman made a deal with the Democratic leadership that allowed him to keep his seniority and become chairman of the Governmental Affairs Committee. He agreed to vote with the Democrats on all procedural matters unless he asked permission of Majority Whip Richard Durbin (a request that is almost never made or granted) in return for the committee assignments that would have been available to him had he remained a Democrat. He is free to vote as he pleases on policy matters, but usually votes with the Democrats.

Popular culture and media controversy

Bush and the "kiss"

Enlarge picture
President Bush leans close to Lieberman at the 2005 State of the Union.
Following his 2005 State of the Union address, President Bush, while shaking lawmakers’ hands, abruptly grasped Lieberman’s head in both hands and leaned in close to his cheek. The incident became known as "the kiss." At first, Lieberman's staff humorously referred to the embrace as "some kind of Yale thing."[46] However, political backlash arose among Lamont supporters and other critics of Lieberman. Lamont backers used the incident in a campaign button: "The Kiss: Too Close for Comfort"[47] and a large papier-mache sculpture that followed Lieberman on the campaign trail.[48] Lieberman has since denied the kiss took place. "I don't think he kissed me, he leaned over and gave me a hug and said 'thank you for being a patriotic American,'" Lieberman told Time Magazine.[49] After Lieberman's defeat in the Democratic primary, an editorial claimed Bush's sign of affinity cost him the nomination, and referred to the incident as "the kiss of death." Lieberman would still go on to win the seat as an independent.

Donor controversy

In February 2007, Lieberman spoke before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in support of the confirmation of Sam Fox as ambassador to Belgium. Fox, a prominent Republican businessman and political donor, was a contributor to the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth campaign in 2004.[50] Fox is also reported to have donated to Lieberman's 2006 Senate campaign.[51]

Published works

Lieberman is the author of six books: The Power Broker (1966), a biography of the late Democratic Party chairman, John M. Bailey; The Scorpion and the Tarantula (1970), a study of early efforts to control nuclear proliferation; The Legacy (1981), a history of Connecticut politics from 1930 to 1980; Child Support in America (1986), a guidebook on methods to increase the collection of child support from delinquent fathers, In Praise of Public Life (2000), and An Amazing Adventure (2003), reflecting on his 2000 vice presidential run.

Electoral history

  • 1988 Connecticut Senate Election
*Joe Lieberman (D) 50.4%
*Lowell Weicker (R) inc. 49.6%
  • 1994 Connecticut Senate Election
*Joe Lieberman (D) inc. 67%
*Jerry Labriola (R) 31%
  • 2000 Connecticut Senate Election
*Joe Lieberman (D) inc. 63%
*Philip Giordano (R) 34%
  • 2000 Presidential Election
*Bush/Cheney 47.9%, 271 Electoral Votes
*Gore/Lieberman 48.4%, 266 Electoral Votes
  • 2006 Connecticut Democratic United States Senatorial Primary Election
*Ned Lamont 52%
*Joe Lieberman inc. 48%
  • 2006 Connecticut United States Senatorial Election
*Joe Lieberman (I) inc. 50%
*Ned Lamont (D) 40%
*Alan Schlesinger (R) 10%

References

1. ^ [1]
2. ^ Senators of the 110th Congress. U.S. Senate (2006-01-03)..
3. ^ Transcript: Sen. Joe Lieberman on 'FOX News Sunday' Fox News.com. January 28, 2007.
4. ^ Joe Lieberman, US Senator. Marcia Lieberman, 90, Mother of Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman, Died Sunday: Press release. June 27, 2005.
5. ^ Buckley, William F. Lieberman Bowing In. National Review. January 14, 2003.
6. ^ Slow bus to freedom. San Diego Union-Tribune January 8, 2006.
7. ^ You Go, Joe. New York Magazine November 18, 2002.
8. ^ Merida, Kevin. Lieberman's Morality Concerns Not New. ''The Washington Post September 5, 1998.
9. ^ Lieberman: A history-making candidate. CNN.com, Retrieved October 10, 2006.
10. ^ Senate Roll Call Roll Call Vote
11. ^ Goodstein, Laurie. Modern Orthodox (Sen. Lieberman) New York Times August 19, 2000.
12. ^ Gold, Matea. Lieberman and religion seem to be an easy mix. Los Angeles Times August 28, 2000.
13. ^ [2]
14. ^ Senator Joe Lieberman Attacks Clinton. AustralianPolitics.com September 3, 1998, Retrieved October 10, 2006.
15. ^ U.S. Senate Republican Congress. Committee Assignments. Retrieved October 10, 2006.
16. ^ [3]
17. ^ Quote of the Day. Political Insider (2007-02-22).
18. ^ Preview of Friday's 'Time' Magazine: Lieberman and Hagel Speak Out. Editor & Publisher (2007-02-22).
19. ^ Lieberman Switch Wouldn't Flip Senate. Political Insider (2007-02-22).
20. ^ S.RES.27. The Library of Congress (2007-01-07).
21. ^ Democrats Take Control on Hill. Washington Post (2007-01-05).
22. ^ Toobin, Jeffrey. Joe Lieberman looks hopefully toward the White House. The New Yorker December 16, 2002.
23. ^ PollingReport.com Retrieved October 10, 2006.
24. ^ Limbaugh, David. The left still controls the Democratic Party. WorldNetDaily August 6, 2002.
25. ^ Lieberman says he's got the 'Joementum' CNN.com January 26, 2004. Retrieved March 6, 2007.
26. ^ Hamilton, Elizabeth. Lieberman Reflects on Candidacy. The Hartford Courant April 15, 2004.
27. ^ Gore Endorses Dean: CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL transcipt. CNN.com December 9, 2003. Retrieved October 10, 2006.
28. ^ Election results. Hartford Courant August 10, 2006.
29. ^ Klein, Rick. Lieberman crafts backup plan: Says he'll run even if he loses primary. The Boston Globe July 4, 2006.
30. ^ Murray, Shailagh. Lieberman May Run as Independent. The Washington Post July 4, 2006.
31. ^ Haigh, Susan. Lieberman campaign files forms to run as petitioning candidate. The Boston Globe July 10, 2006.
32. ^ Barry, Ellen. Lieberman Is Defeated in Primary. Los Angeles Times August 9, 2006. pg. A1.
33. ^ Lieberman concedes to Lamont, vows to run in November. CNN August 10, 2006. Retrieved October 10, 2006.
34. ^ Associated Press. Connecticut Groups Push to Remove Lieberman From Ballot. The Washington Post August 22, 2006.
35. ^ Fouhy, Beth. Clinton Reiterates Pledge to Back Lamont. The Washington Post August 10, 2006.
36. ^ Nagourney, Adam. PRIMARY IN CONNECTICUT: NEWS ANALYSIS; A Referendum On Iraq Policy. New York Times August 9, 2006.
37. ^ Healy, Patrick and Medina, Jennifer. Lieberman Goes on the Offensive, Linking the Terror Threat to Iraq. New York Times August 11, 2006.
38. ^ NRSC Takes Lieberman. Retrieved October 10, 2006.
39. ^ [4] The Right Perspective Podcast Blog, November 11, 2006.
40. ^ First Read. MSNBC.com. August 17, 2006.
41. ^ Kerrey for Lieberman. Retrieved October 10, 2006.
42. ^ Associated Press. Top Republican co-hosted fundraiser for Lieberman. International Herald Tribune. September 21, 2006.
43. ^ Medina, Jennifer. In Connecticut Iraq Debate, Vague Policy Prescriptions.
New York Times''. September 18, 2006. pg. B3.
44. ^ Lieberman Stumps In New York, With Koch By His Side. NY1 News, October 3, 2006.
45. ^ Joe Lieberman wins CT Senate race. Retrieved November 7, 2006.
46. ^ Straw, Joseph. Washington analyzes smooch President plants a kiss on Lieberman’s cheek. New Haven Register February 4, 2005.
47. ^ Carlson, Margaret. Lieberman Is Paying Price for One Peck From W: Bloomberg.com June 29, 2005.
48. ^ Smith, Adam C. Lip service to Lieberman is his liability. St. Petersburg Times July 16, 2006.
49. ^ Bacon, Perry. Can Lieberman Survive Iraq? Time Magazine June 25, 2006.
50. ^ Akers, Mary. "Lieberman and Swiftie Donor, Bound by Admiration.... and Money", Washington Post, November 2006. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 
51. ^ Lightman, David. "Fox Makes Friends And Foes", Hartford Courant, March 8, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-03-16. 

External links

Official sites

Voting records

Interviews

Contributors

Miscellaneous

United States Senate
Preceded by
Lowell P. Weicker, Jr.
Senator from Connecticut (Class 1)
1989 – present
Served alongside: Chris Dodd
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Fred Thompson
Chairman of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee
2001 – 2003
Succeeded by
Susan Collins
Preceded by
Susan Collins
Chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee
2007 – present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Al Gore
Democratic Party Vice Presidential nominee
2000
Succeeded by
John Edwards
Legal offices
Preceded by
Carl R. Ajello
Attorney General of Connecticut
1983 – 1989
Succeeded by
Clarine Nardi Riddle
Current Committee Assignments
Committee Position
Armed ServicesSubcommittee Chairman
Environment and Public WorksSubcommittee Chairman
Homeland Security and Governmental AffairsCommittee Chairman
Small Business and Entrepreneurship


Persondata
NAMELieberman, Joseph Isadore
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTIONConnecticut politician
DATE OF BIRTHFebruary 24 1942
PLACE OF BIRTHStamford, Connecticut
DATE OF DEATHliving
PLACE OF DEATH
United States Senate

Type Upper House

President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R
since January 20, 2001
President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D
since January 4, 2007

Members 100
Political groups Democratic Party
Republican Party
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State of Connecticut

Flag of Connecticut Seal of Connecticut
Nickname(s): The Constitution State, The Nutmeg State[]
Motto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet[0]
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January 24 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

Events


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Year 1942 (MCMXLII
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Stamford, Connecticut

Seal
Nickname: The City That Works
Location in Connecticut
Coordinates:
NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford
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Labour Party

Leader Gordon Brown

Founded February 27, 1900
Headquarters 39 Victoria Street
London, SW1H 0HA

Political Ideology Democratic socialism (Official Position)
Social Democracy
Third Way


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Hadassah Lieberman (born Hadassah Freilich in the refugee camp of Prague, Czechoslovakia in Mar. 28, 1948) is the wife of Senator Joseph Lieberman (ID - CT).
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Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 as the Collegiate School, Yale is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and is a member of the Ivy League.
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A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics.
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A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is "a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law.
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Kabbalah (Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‎, Tiberian: qabːɔˈlɔh, Qabbālāh, Israeli:
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February 24 is the 1st day of the year (2nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 0 days remaining.

By Roman custom February 24
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19th century - 20th century - 21st century
1910s  1920s  1930s  - 1940s -  1950s  1960s  1970s
1939 1940 1941 - 1942 - 1943 1944 1945

Year 1942 (MCMXLII
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United States of America

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United States




Federal government
Constitution
Taxation

President Vice President
Cabinet


Congress
Senate
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State of Connecticut

Flag of Connecticut Seal of Connecticut
Nickname(s): The Constitution State, The Nutmeg State[]
Motto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet[0]
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United States Senate

Type Upper House

President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R
since January 20, 2001
President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D
since January 4, 2007

Members 100
Political groups Democratic Party
Republican Party
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Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 72006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. Senators are elected for six-year terms, with one third of the Senate seats up for a vote every two years.
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In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore after the United States Supreme Court in Bush v.
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United States of America

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United States




Federal government
Constitution
Taxation

President Vice President
Cabinet


Congress
Senate
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vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. The name comes from the Latin vice meaning in place of. In some countries, the vice president is called the deputy president.
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Albert Arnold "Al" Gore, Jr. (born March 31, 1948) was the forty-fifth vice president of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001 under President Bill Clinton. Before that, Vice President Gore served in the U. S. House of Representatives (1977–85) and the U. S.
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7,000,000
2.5% of the US population
Regions with significant populations New York City, All along the BosWash Megalopolis in the Northeastern United States, South Florida, the West Coast (especially the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas), the Chicago-Milwaukee
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An election is a decision making process where people choose people to hold official offices. This is the usual mechanism by which modern democracy fills offices in the legislature, sometimes in the executive and judiciary, and for regional and local government.
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electoral college is a set of electors, who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect a candidate to a particular office. Often these electors represent a different organization or entity with each organization or entity by a particular number of electors or with votes weighted
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The 2004 presidential election may refer to:
  • Afghan presidential election, 2004
  • Algerian presidential election, 2004
  • Austrian presidential election, 2004
  • Dominican Republic presidential election, 2004
  • Georgia presidential election, 2004

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Independent may refer to:
  • Independence, the self-government of a nation, country, or state
  • Independent (politician), not affiliated with any political party
  • Independent (voter), not a member of any political party

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Connecticut for Lieberman is the Connecticut political party created by twenty-five supporters of Senator Joe Lieberman. The party was created to enable Sen. Lieberman to run for re-election following his defeat in the Connecticut Democratic primary, as Connecticut election
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United States Senate

Type Upper House

President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R
since January 20, 2001
President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D
since January 4, 2007

Members 100
Political groups Democratic Party
Republican Party
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110th United States Congress

United States Capitol (2002)
Session: January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2009
President of the Senate: Dick Cheney
President pro tempore of the Senate: Robert Byrd
Speaker of the House: Nancy Pelosi
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Independent Democrat is a term occasionally adopted by members of the United States Congress to refer to their party affiliation.

The first Independent Democrat in the United States House of Representatives was Zadok Casey in the mid-1800s.
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