long title

The long title (properly, the title) is one of the parts, together with the short title, and the operative provisions (sections and Schedules), which comprise an Act of Parliament or Bill in the United Kingdom and certain other Commonwealth Realms. An Act or Bill is usually identified by its short title, but the long title provides a longer description of the purposes or scope of the Act. The long title appears at the beginning of every Act, and opens with the words "An Act to ..." (or, before the Act is enacted, "A Bill to...").

For example, the short title of the House of Lords Act 1999 is House of Lords Act 1999, but its long title is An Act to restrict membership of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; to make related provision about disqualifications for voting at elections to, and for membership of, the House of Commons; and for connected purposes.

Like other descriptive components of an act (such as the preamble, section headings, side notes, and short title), the long title seldom affects the operative provisions of an Act, except where the operative provisions are unclear or ambiguous and the long title provides a clear statement of Parliament's intention.

The long title is important since, under the procedures of Parliament, a Bill cannot be amended to go outside the scope of its long title. For that reason, the long title tends to be rather vague, ending with the formulation "and for connected purposes".

Many early Acts were enacted without a short title, and the long title was used to identify the Act, although short titles were given to many of the extant Acts at later dates. The Bill of Rights was given that short title by the Short Titles Act 1896; previously, it was formally known by its long title, An Act Declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject and Settling the Succession of the Crown. The long title for older Acts is sometimes termed its rubric because it was sometimes printed in red.

The long title should be distinguished from the preamble, which is an optional part of an Act or Bill and follows immediately after the long title and date of Royal Assent, consisting of a number of preliminary statements of facts similar to recitals, each starting Whereas....

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The short title is the formal name by which a piece of primary legislation is usually referred to in the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia).
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An Act of Parliament or Act is law by the parliament (see legislation).
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A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent.
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Motto
"Dieu et mon droit" [2]   (French)
"God and my right"
Anthem
"God Save the Queen" [3]
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The reason for its protection is listed on the protection policy page. The page may still be edited but cannot be moved until unprotected.
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Acts of Parliament of predecessor
states to the United Kingdom

Acts of English Parliament to 1601
Acts of English Parliament to 1641
Acts and Ordinances (Interregnum) to 1660
Acts of English Parliament to 1699
Acts of English Parliament to 1706
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preamble is an introductory statement or preliminary explanation as to the purpose of the document and the principles behind its philosophy. The term is particularly applied to the opening paragraph(s) of a statute, which recite historical facts which may be pertinent to the issue
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parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. The name is derived from the French parlement, the action of parler (to speak): a parlement
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A bill of rights is a list or summary of rights that are considered important and essential by a group of people, generally leaders of the group create this bill. The purpose of these bills is to protect those rights against infringement of people.
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A rubric is a letter or section of text (especially decorative text) which is highlighted in red ink.

The term originates in Medieval illuminated manuscripts from the 14th century when red letters were used to highlight initial capitals (particularly of psalms), section
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The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament.
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In Law, a recital (from the Latin word recitare, meaning: to read out) consists of an account or repetition of the details of some act, proceeding or fact. Particularly, in law, that part of a legal document - such as a lease, which contains a statement of certain facts -
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Halsbury's Laws is the name of a legal encyclopaedia produced by LexisNexis.
  • Halsbury's Laws of England
  • Halsbury's Laws of Australia

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A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. Typically, statutes command, prohibit, or declare policy.
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