USS Farragut (DD-348)

For other ships with the same name, see USS Farragut.

The third USS Farragut (DD-348) was named for Admiral David Glasgow Farragut (1801–1870). She was the lead ship of her class of destroyers in the United States Navy.

Contents

History

Farragut was laid down by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts, on 20 September 1932, launched on 15 March 1934 by Mrs. James Roosevelt, daughter-in-law of the President, and commissioned on 18 June 1934, with Commander Elliott Buckmaster in command.

Farragut underway in September 1939.

Because it was nearly 14 years since a new destroyer had been commissioned in the U.S. Navy, Farragut devoted much of her early service to developmental operations, cruising out of her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia, to the Caribbean and along the east coast. On 26 March 1935, she embarked with President Franklin D. Roosevelt at Jacksonville, Florida, and the next day carried him to a rendezvous with a private yacht. Farragut escorted the President's yacht on a cruise to the Bahamas; on 7 April he embarked on her for passage to Jacksonville, where he left the ship on 8 April 1935.

Farragut sailed for San Diego, California, arriving there on 19 April 1935 to join Destroyer Squadron 20 as flagship. Fleet maneuvers on the west coast, training operations in the Hawaiian Islands, and cruises during the summer to train men of the Naval Reserve in Alaskan waters continued until 3 January 1939. Farragut then sailed for fleet maneuvers in the Caribbean, returning to San Diego on 12 April. From 2 October she was based at Pearl Harbor, and made two voyages to the west coast to screen carriers to Pearl Harbor. From 1 August 1941, Farragut was pretty much at sea for exercises with carrier task forces.

World War II

Farragut was berthed in a nest of destroyers in East Loch, Pearl Harbor, at the time of the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. Ensign James Armen Benham, her engineering officer and senior on board at the time, got her underway, and as she... ...read more

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